Our New Yellow Show Tang is Turning White - Page 2
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Saltwater Fish and Coral Reef Tanks » Saltwater Fish Diseases » Our New Yellow Show Tang is Turning White

Our New Yellow Show Tang is Turning White

This is a discussion on Our New Yellow Show Tang is Turning White within the Saltwater Fish Diseases forums, part of the Saltwater Fish and Coral Reef Tanks category; --> I have well water I know alot of LFS that fill there systems with well water and they do not contain any metals, most ...

Check out these saltwater fish profiles
Sailfin Tang
Sailfin Tang
Fire Goby
Fire Goby
Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
Our New Yellow Show Tang is Turning White
Old 11-08-2006, 03:04 PM   #11
 
Quote:
I have well water
I know alot of LFS that fill there systems with well water and they do not contain any metals, most LFS will have a well dug so they do not have to use city water and its free.
usmc121581 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2006, 04:38 PM   #12
 
bettababy's Avatar
 
That wouldn't apply to any LFS around here, everything is on city water. The difficult part of working with well water is that it is different everywhere you go. One person's well water will come up with different minerals and even nutrient levels than anothers. If test kits are a challenge to find locally, then I would highly suggest shopping online. To keep a saltwater tank healthy and stable, the water will need to be tested regularly, however you can find to do it.
Have you tested the pH? Over using stress coat can be more dangerous than none at all. Stress coat is a great product, but when overdosed, it will cause all kinds of shifts in water quality and it is difficult to fix. Some fish will be more prone to showing signs of distress from specific problems. Too much stress coat, especially long term, can bottom out the pH level. The ONLY way to fix it is with SMALL daily water changes, using no stress coat or water conditioners. I think you can then understand why it is difficult to fix without harming fish. If the stress coat isn't causing this problem (which it probably isn't), then please use this as a warning to cut back on your use of it. Don't dose beyond the suggested dosage on the bottle, and use only when putting clean, untreated water into the tank. A few drops when adding new fish is ok, but beyond that, it is considered excessive and dangerous.
As for what IS causing the problem, without water test results to work with, nobody here is going to be able to do much to help you. Even if we find it to be a parasite or other illness, without knowing water params, it is unwise to ever medicate a tank.
Considering it's only the tangs being affected, I am tempted to say it could even be a nutrition issue. What kind of foods are you offering to the fish? (include any foods you put into the tank for any of the fish)
Nutrition is a big issue, especially for saltwater animals, and it is often overlooked because of the number of food products offered to us at LFS's worldwide. Not ALL of the foods offered are healthy, and not all provide for specific nutritional needs of all species of fish. There is also the issue of whether a fish is eating the food we offer.
I can supply a list of healthy foods for these fish, but water stats are still going to come into play here, again. If anything is off in the water quality, that alone will stress a fish enough to cause loss of appetite.
I have just read back in the posts here, and I notice the mention of "slight" ammonia, and it was pointed out that ANY ammonia is toxic. What I didn't see was any mention of that ammonia converting to nitrite, which, in any level, is also highly toxic. This "mini cycle" as it appears to be, could easily cause the problems mentioned, including loss of appetite, the fading of color in the tangs, and the cloudy eyes or loss of sight for the pufferfish.
http://drsfostersmith.com is a good place to begin an online search for test kits. What you will be needing is pH, ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, KH, and calcium. Those are the tests you'll always want to have on hand. If dealing with well water, I would also suggest checking into some of the heavy metals that could cause you issues. Iron will be the biggest, and also possibly copper, which is highly toxic to inverts, but long term can cause problems for fish, too.
Try feeding the puffer by hand or with a feeding stick, and offer a wide variety. Anything it doesn't eat, remove from the tank immediately, so as not to cause any ammonia spikes. Uneaten food will pollute the tank very fast, and cause all of the problems I mentioned above, and then some.
I hope this helps, and I'll keep watching here for water params.
Good Luck!
bettababy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2006, 04:52 PM   #13
 
caferacermike's Avatar
 
Even with well water I'd run it through an RO unit just to be safe. Marine fish and inverts are just to sensitive to risk it.
caferacermike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2006, 05:49 PM   #14
 
bettababy's Avatar
 
Mike, I agree, but I also am practical in knowing that the majority of people can't afford to buy/run an RO Unit. For that, I would also always suggest running a UV on a marine tank, but again, reality dictates that most people can't afford equipment like that, or the maintenance this equipment requires.
Between RO and UV, you would eliminate most of the common problems with water quality and illnesses. Parasite and bacterial problems would be a thing of the past, and other than nutrient levels, the water would also be premium. In a perfect world... which, unfortunately, ours is not.
bettababy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2006, 05:57 PM   #15
 
I have been up and down the east coast, so can some one explain why every were I have been that everyone has said the same thing about well water and then about its actually a waste to even buy a RO. I mean Iwould like to know why people have different opinions in different regions of the country and/or world. Since being part of the fish forum family I have noticed stuff like this. :
usmc121581 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2006, 06:28 PM   #16
 
bettababy's Avatar
 
Let me attempt to answer this simply... Different regions, different locations, different water quality. Well water differs from tap water, and both differ from RO water. It can be a matter of what is being kept in the tank... some animals need higher mineral content, which well water would provide and tap or RO may require the addition of chemicals to make up this difference. Then, you also have the risk of undesirable minerals in the well water, again, based on what is being kept in the tank.
For an example, let me use 2 of my tanks. My 15 gallon seahorse tank with no corals is stable and easy to care for using tap water, but my 120 reef tank is strictly RO/DI water, NEVER tap. Why? Mineral content, other conaminants, and the animals in each tank with their special requirements.
Difference in location will bring difference in opinion. Difference in education will bring difference in opinion. Difference in experience will bring difference of opinion.
Does this help?
bettababy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2006, 10:02 PM   #17
 
caferacermike's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bettababy
Mike, I agree, but I also am practical in knowing that the majority of people can't afford to buy/run an RO Unit. For that, I would also always suggest running a UV on a marine tank, but again, reality dictates that most people can't afford equipment like that, or the maintenance this equipment requires.
Between RO and UV, you would eliminate most of the common problems with water quality and illnesses. Parasite and bacterial problems would be a thing of the past, and other than nutrient levels, the water would also be premium. In a perfect world... which, unfortunately, ours is not.
The hobby is pricey.

"the majority of people can't afford to buy/run an RO Unit. For that, I would also always suggest running a UV on a marine tank,"

But that won't solve the possible high TDS or mineral/metals count coming from the earth he lives over.

I look at it like this, the hobby is pricey. Sucks. The fish and inverts are expensive. Sucks I know. But to keep expensive fish and inverts alive you sometimes have to spend some coin. I own a 6 stage RO/DI unit, cost me $500. I still prefer to buy RO/DI from the lfs at $1 a 5 gallon jug. Why? Because my RO wastes to much water to justify doing it at home. Instead I buy all my make up water (30g a week) and use the RO unit only for doing extras like water changes. If you can't afford an RO unit don't despair, it really is cheaper to just buy purified water than to run an expensive filter. Honestly $500 for a unit and $200 in replacement filters each year or $5-6 a week at the lfs? But if I couldn't make it to one and only had well water I'd surely send off a sample to the local university and ask for reading and or make the necessary adjustments. An RO unit just takes the guess work out of the equation altogether.

USMC you ask why an RO unit in different areas? For the same exact reason Coke and Pepsi triple distill their water used to make colas. The water is different everywhere, mine is purified through limestone that was once the bottom of an ocean, so they triple RO/DI the water and it tastes the same everywhere. That way a MT. Dew bottled in CA tastes the same as it would bottled in NY.
caferacermike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2006, 11:51 PM   #18
 
bettababy's Avatar
 
What a price fluctuation in different areas of the country. Here at home we have our own RO/DI unit, but if we were to have to go to the LFS to buy the water, it costs 50 cents/gallon here... meaning that a 5 gallon bucket would cost $2.50. That adds up fast when you're working with a larger tank and/or doing weekly changes. To buy premixed saltwater from the LFS its $1.50/gallon, and in both cases, you must provide your own containers. Also, most of the RO/DI units sold around here average $600 - $800 at a LFS. At work once, we tried to figure out which would be cheaper for someone running a 55 gallon tank, and in the long term, buying the unit was still cheaper.
Then, we also have had customers who use distilled water bought at the grocery store... but by the time they buy the trace elements and other mineral suppliments, they are spending more than if they'd simply buy the RO/DI water from the LFS.
So, now I'm wondering what you'd all tell a 15 yr old who's parents buy them a fish tank and basic setup for saltwater to get them started... buy a $500 - $800 unit to hook up at home, provided the parents allow it, buy water from their local LFS @ $2.50/5 gallons each week, or work with their tap water and less expensive filter medias to remove the impurities from their water? Or, do you tell them that its an expensive hobby, sorry, but if you can't afford the expensive stuff, stick to freshwater... and the supplies your parents purchased won't work for freshwater?
I ask because this is not an uncommon scenario, and I have seen some people do saltwater "cheap" and make it work, so long as they are selective about what they want to keep and how they do it. My saltwater tanks are relatively cheap, including those using tap water.
IMO, saltwater can be done on most any budget, without the "extras" that some people insist are a must have to make it work. It's a matter of knowing your budget, understanding the environment you wish to create, and working within your means.
bettababy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2006, 05:51 AM   #19
 
It was just always mind blowing how things are in different areas, like caferacermike you stated you just buy it from your LFS. But here every LFS you go to will tell you a RO isn't worth, and they just dump straight well water into there tanks. I asked them if it were bad and they said it better then the RO water. But you guys cleared it up a little.
usmc121581 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2006, 07:09 AM   #20
 
caferacermike's Avatar
 
"IMO, saltwater can be done on most any budget, without the "extras" that some people insist are a must have to make it work."

You are misrepresenting me. I've said many times that salt may be had on any budget and I've also said many times that I feel many peoples freshwater tanks are poorly put together, it's just the fish are cheaper and more tolerant. A good freshwater tank isn't necessarily a cheap one either.

What I was saying is only and only if, his well water does in fact contain heavy metals (which is and was the only part of the thread I've been responding to) an RO unit or bought in water might be the best/only solution. But that is only if the water is indeed tainted. Can you siuggest something else if indeed the water tests came back saying he had high traces of heavy metals? Would you still say an RO unit is silly? Would I tell a 15 yo girl that lives 100 miles from the city that has horrible well water that she will probably need a filter? Yes. I mean what else can you do if the source is contaminated? If the source is not contaminated you can do all sorts of other things. Does that mean I'll ever put straight tap water into my reef? Absolutely not, not ever. To many dissolved solids building up in the tank. As to replacing trace minerals in RO water? Why? that's what my salt mix is for. Buy the right mix for your tank and it's all in there. The minerals are replaceed with regular water changes. Sure if the individual never does water changes the added minerals from a tap or well would be beneficial but after many years of reading about how corals absorb minerals from the water supply I now preach water changes to replenish them.

You get back exactly what you out into it.
caferacermike is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Silver/White goldfish turning yellow??? rae3988 Tropical Fish Diseases 54 02-14-2008 10:07 AM
Freshwater fish turning yellow? Lindsey Tropical Fish Diseases 3 09-17-2007 04:33 PM
Yellow Tang ben1234 Saltwater Fish 3 08-15-2007 01:50 AM
new tank, one fish turning yellow. i like fishes Saltwater Fish 11 04-03-2007 06:01 AM
gravel turning yellow?` paisley_tele Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 4 12-11-2006 06:05 PM


« ick | ?pH? »
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:29 AM.