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Saltwater Fish 1.5 ft. nano tank lighting

This is a discussion on Saltwater Fish 1.5 ft. nano tank lighting within the Saltwater Aquarium Equipment forums, part of the Beginner Saltwater Aquariums category; --> "will require a bare minimum of 75G" My initial plan was a 4 ft tank, but having said that without much knowledge on the ...

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Saltwater Fish 1.5 ft. nano tank lighting
Old 06-01-2008, 11:38 PM   #11
 
"will require a bare minimum of 75G"

My initial plan was a 4 ft tank, but having said that without much knowledge on the param, it will be sad to see fish dying. At this stage, i'm working hard to learn how to improve the param, nano tank is the best start, give me 1 month or 2 month or a quarter, i will check and see the progress. If it is successful, then there is no longer problem for me to install a 4 ft. tank. I will then get a 2 ft sump tank.

At this stage, i've successfully control the param and still working to improve for a long term sustainable ecological system.
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Old 06-03-2008, 09:34 AM   #12
 
there is no way to create a sustainable ecological system with 6 fish that size in a 24 gallon tank

you do not have enough live rock nor enough space for the fish to swim
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Old 06-03-2008, 09:47 AM   #13
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DJOstrichHead
there is no way to create a sustainable ecological system with 6 fish that size in a 24 gallon tank

you do not have enough live rock nor enough space for the fish to swim
In SW tanks, larger tanks (75+g) are normally easier to care for since there is more water volume and it takes a little longer for the tank parameters to change.
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Old 06-03-2008, 10:14 AM   #14
 
This is a nano tank. It is not a thread to say why ppl. should swtich to nano tank. It is a thread to experiment how people can maximize from nano tank from beginner to expert.

Everything start small, manageable, from there onwards move upward to larger tank, better Protein Skimmer, better sump tank, and many more, perhaps a chiller, Metal Halide, and self sustain ecological tank.

Just perform regular water check and adding of salt water when necessary.

Your threads imply that all beginner should get a big tank but what's the point of big tank wiv huge gallons ending up the person dun have any clues on how to set up a basic sustainable saltwater fish tank?
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Old 06-03-2008, 10:20 AM   #15
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jumpman23
Your threads imply that all beginner should get a big tank but what's the point of big tank wiv huge gallons ending up the person dun have any clues on how to set up a basic sustainable saltwater fish tank?
I'm not exactly saying that. Large tanks are much more expensive, especially if something goes wrong. There's always a trade off. Large tanks need lots of floor support, are very expensive, and require large water changes. Nano tanks require more frequent tests and water changes. It's just a matter of personal preference.
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Old 06-03-2008, 10:27 AM   #16
 
Excuse me if i misread what u re saying here

Quote:
larger tanks (75+g) are normally easier to care for since there is more water volume
In fact nano tank is much easier, water monitoring and change, before you really decide to start a 4 ft without knowing wat to do.
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Old 06-03-2008, 10:30 AM   #17
 
Actually, this is how it goes.

Say, a fish dies in your tank (say it is 15G) or in my Nano Reef (10G), and we are on vacation or dont notice for a few days, then the ammonia poisining will spread very fast and kill off your other fish/corals/inverts. In a larger tank, it doesn't spread as fast, and it needs to spread farther, so you have a higher likely chanche that things will survive just in case something goes wrong in a larger tank. It is the same in Freshwater. Sure, it may cost less and you have to do less gallons of water when you change, but you have to look at the big picture.
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Old 06-03-2008, 10:37 AM   #18
 
Your logic is based on startup & capacity, but this topic is abt. what is best to keep a nano tank due to space constraint also learner stage.

Those who never or have little knowledge to start keeping saltwater should begin small and work toward bigger tank, not bigger tank then only learn how to regulate water quality and water treatment knowledge.
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Old 06-03-2008, 12:44 PM   #19
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jumpman23
Excuse me if i misread what u re saying here

Quote:
larger tanks (75+g) are normally easier to care for since there is more water volume
In fact nano tank is much easier, water monitoring and change, before you really decide to start a 4 ft without knowing wat to do.
you are 100% wrong. a 55 gallon tank is probably the best starting size for a beginner.

others and myself have told you many times you are going about things the wrong way yet you still have no worry for the animals in your "care"

you obviously have no idea how aquariums work and have pushed your own tank past the its bioload limit two-fold.

if you want to kill fish then do it. just stop disseminating the wrong information to others who are trying to not kill their fish
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Old 06-03-2008, 06:54 PM   #20
 
Quote:
"55 gallon tank is probably the best starting size for a beginner."
A beginner who can't even handle a small tank and understand the basic of water quality and filtration system (Protein Skimmer + Sump/Canister Filter/Hang on filter), how can he or she handle a big tank?

There are many beginner with 4 ft or 3 ft tank keep returning to the shop after 1 or 2 weeks, then the advise is keep changing the water, without even understand how to improve their water quality and what is filtration and what kind of filtration product are good. That's the reason they ended giving up after 1 yr or 2 yrs of marine fish keeping becos the upkeep has become troublesome still they continue to visit their local fish shop to replenish their livestock.

Quote:
"Nano tanks require more frequent tests and water changes"
There is no frequent water test just regular test to ensure your fish are in healthy mode. And to correct that there is no frequent water changes becos the water dun evaporate that much, water addition apply to all type of tank.
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