PH Contoller
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PH Contoller

This is a discussion on PH Contoller within the Saltwater Aquarium Equipment forums, part of the Beginner Saltwater Aquariums category; --> Hello, I am currently looking to purchase a PH Controller for my marine tank but I'm not very familiar with the product. I am ...

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Old 11-03-2007, 04:57 AM   #1
 
PH Contoller

Hello,
I am currently looking to purchase a PH Controller for my marine tank but I'm not very familiar with the product.
I am using a mini-reef system with a minireef filter system, a calcium reactor, Redsea CO2 regulator, a JBL solenoid valve, pin valve, check valve, CO2 cylinder, UV sterilizer and a chiller.

About the PH contoller,
What level of pH is the controller set to? Not what the PH in the tank should be, but the PH controller setting.
Also what should the PH level be in the calcium reactor?

Thanks,
Jason.
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Old 11-03-2007, 10:35 AM   #2
 
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Pinpoint makes reliable controllers. They measure the PH in the reactor, if it rises above your "set point" (Typically 7.6) it will begin churning out low PH water from the CA reactor until the reactors parameters are met. Efficiency will be dictated by the controller and media. If you have your CO2 set incorrectly it will quickly turn your media to pudding. It will still work but look horrible. There is a slight chance your media could even turn to cement and solidify if left like that. In the end a point of 7.6-7.8PH is typical when "dialed in".

With the amount of detail you've put into the tank I'd skip a single PH controller as they are expensive by themselves. A good one could easily set you back $200. Instead spend $300 on a ReefKeeperII (2)controller (or other similar controller, but RKII is about the simplest and cheapest). You will get a controller that will run chillers, time several lights together, has an auxillary function that if the water gets to hot even with a chiller (or if there isn't one) it will kill the lighting to save the tank, runs your CA reactor, wave maker modes for power heads, etc. etc.... No more stand full of "junk" timers, power strips, fire hazards, cords, controllers etc.. Just a very nice easy to program computer for your tank.
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Old 11-03-2007, 10:37 PM   #3
 
Thanks alot for the reply, Mike.
So the controller should be adjusted to approximately 12.0PH?

I'm thinking to purchase this model.
American Marine Pinpoint ORP Controller
Here is the link: http://www.thereefshop.com.au/index....f6da66d981d9a8
Do you think it's worth the buy? It says it doesn't need to be calibrated?
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Old 11-04-2007, 12:32 AM   #4
 
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Well the unit you show a link to is an oxygen sensor. It basically detects water quality, not PH. You need a similar looking device, http://www.thereefshop.com.au/index....f6da66d981d9a8

This will simplify your entire set up. http://www.digitalaquatics.com/

Cost in US dollars for Pinpoint PH controller, $189. Reefkeeper II, $270+about $35 for PH probe.

Around $300 and worth every penny. Think of the hundreds of dollars of extra cords, timers (and we all know how easy they fail), wave controllers, etc that you can get rid of. For an extra $100 you can have it all. Avoid the Octopus controller on your website as they are overly complicated to program (typically need to wire it to a PC and write it in code). Current exchange rate puts it at $325 AUS. Current Aus price for Pinpoint controller, $329 AUS.

I'd also like to make a correction, I said that the PH is higher in a reactor, I'm unsure why I said that. In fact it is lower than the tank water. It should be set for around 7.6 inside the reactor chamber. I must have had something else on my mind as even in another thread I suggested to somebody that at night CO2 levels elevate and cause PH to drop. Got it right in that one but goofed here.

Please read up http://www.reefkeeping.com/issues/20...ture/index.php
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Old 11-04-2007, 12:37 AM   #5
 
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Another good suggestion, one I typically forget as my reactor is built this way, is to get a dual chamber reactor as it will allow the PH to stabilize before entering the tank. You can easily add another with the use of a $25 phosphate reactor with no media in it.
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