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Nano skimmers

This is a discussion on Nano skimmers within the Saltwater Aquarium Equipment forums, part of the Beginner Saltwater Aquariums category; --> thanks for the advise.. didn't know that it takes that much work for such a small tank. i should have upgraded to a bigger ...

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Old 01-17-2008, 02:57 PM   #11
 
thanks for the advise.. didn't know that it takes that much work for such a small tank. i should have upgraded to a bigger one..
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Old 01-17-2008, 03:02 PM   #12
 
thanks for the advise.. didn't know that it takes that much work for such a small tank. i should have upgraded to a bigger one..
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Old 01-17-2008, 04:20 PM   #13
 
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Your welcome. It is commonly thought that the smaller the tank the less work involved... but when it comes to fish keeping, especially saltwater... that is exactly the opposite. For future reference, always remember, the smaller the volume of water the faster the rate of change, so bigger is always better!
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Old 01-18-2008, 03:34 PM   #14
 
Another solution could be this chemical that you can put in one of your filtration chambers that's supposed to break down or get rid of proteins. I'm not sure if its actually a chemical or some special bacteria or what. I've never used it or know if its reef safe or if it even works, I just recently heard about it from a LFS, and they didn't know much either. Might be worth looking into though...
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Old 01-18-2008, 07:13 PM   #15
 
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What is the name of it? Is it liquid, powder, etc?? What company makes it? I'm familiar with most of those products, and if I have a name I can probably tell you if its any good or not, and what it is supposed to do/how it works.

I never suggest adding chemicals to assist in cleaning a tank. Most chemicals that are advertised to help lessen the need for water changes are simply a waste of money. Nothing replaces a water change, and what I've noticed isn't commonly recognized... water changes don't just clean the water. When you add clean water to the tank it is also replenishing many minerals that can't be found in a bottle. Without these minerals fish and inverts can't function properly, and it leads to a complete breakdown in water quality and the health of the animals.
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Old 01-21-2008, 11:48 AM   #16
 
I found out what it was. It's called purigen, and from what I've read is supposed to remove proteins in kind of the same way carbon removes stuff, by absorption. Here's link to a site of a company selling it: http://www.drsfostersmith.com/produc...90&pcatid=4190

What do you think?
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Old 01-21-2008, 12:16 PM   #17
 
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Been there, done that, wasted my money if I was expecting what the packaging said. Purigen can be good filter media, but it isn't going to do a thing for surface proteins.

Let me see if I can explain why/how enough for you to understand.

When we add things to the tank, such as food... many of these things have oil bases in them to help them bond, or heavy protein base to them, which, once it hits the water, leeches into the water. Because of the molecular structure of these proteins, they then float at the surface causing what looks like an oil slick. Purigen and other such chemicals go into your filter. Water must pass through them for them to clean it. Your intake on your filter is down low in the tank, which means it isn't going to suck anything from the surface. Thus, the proteins at the surface are still there, collecting and preventing oxygen and other gas exchanges from being possible. Left alone for any amount of time and these surface proteins will suffocate the tank beneath it.
When using a skimmer, they are designed to draw water from the surface, and using air forces the proteins to seperate from the water. The proteins are then collected in the skimmer cup while water is pushed back into the tank.

One way to avoid surface protein buildup in freshwater is to add circulation at the surface, typically an air stone. This isn't such a good idea in saltwater because of salt residue, otherwise known as salt creep. If you get the fine mist on the surface from an air stone or other heavy surface circulation, that water spray will dry on your equip, your tank, and anything else it comes into contact with, leaving behind a residue of salt, which will damage furniture, carpteting, etc.

Does this make more sense for you?
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Old 05-03-2008, 10:41 AM   #18
 
Nano Skimmer

This nano skimmer cost around RM 7x.xx but i heard it is not so good for a 5 gallons above.



I have not yet test them, but will probably get a Nirox skimmer.

This is my tank, i have yet complete, just put with the liverock, sand and the salt water.

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