Good Wet/Dry Filter systems?
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Good Wet/Dry Filter systems?

This is a discussion on Good Wet/Dry Filter systems? within the Saltwater Aquarium Equipment forums, part of the Beginner Saltwater Aquariums category; --> Am looking to add a sump/filter to my existing 55gal FOWLR tanks. Have two of them and a75-80 gal tank also FOWLR as well. ...

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Good Wet/Dry Filter systems?
Old 07-14-2009, 01:42 PM   #1
 
Good Wet/Dry Filter systems?

Am looking to add a sump/filter to my existing 55gal FOWLR tanks. Have two of them and a75-80 gal tank also FOWLR as well. Any thoughts or recommendations for good products?

What about these?

Amazon.com: ProClear Aquatics Slim Line 60 Gallon Wet Dry Filter with PreFilter: Kitchen & Dining

Eshopps Wet Dry Filters, Eshopps Wd75cs Wet / Dry, Single Intake, 10-75 Gal; 18 X 10 X 16

Top Under Aquarium Cabinet Wet/Dry Filter Picks

Good article above but not much info from others that have used these system on the choices. So any info/advice/recon would be nice.
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Old 07-14-2009, 01:43 PM   #2
 
Forgot to add one.

Skilter Filters
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Old 07-14-2009, 07:43 PM   #3
 
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I think you are headed 100% in the wrong direction. Each and every unit which you posted is exactly what I try to avoid in a marine filter. The marketing and advertising for these products is good, but their use on a properly set up marine aquarium leaves a lot to be desired.

You would be much better off to purchase a sump and protein skimmer, skipping the wet dry biomedia completely. A simply 30 gallon breeder tank with a sump style protein skimmer will be much more effective. The primary difference will be the amount of nitrate and phosphate that a wet dry system produces, causing serious long term care difficulties.

For the record, the Skilter is a horrible unit. The protein skimmer is extremely small, the contact time minimal, and the venturi horrible. Additionally, the mechanical filter pad serves almost no purpose on a marine setup. Its only practical use is on a 20 gallon Q tank.

What are you trying to accomplish with each of these aquariums? Lets start this conversation from the beginning.
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Old 07-14-2009, 08:29 PM   #4
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pasfur View Post
I think you are headed 100% in the wrong direction. Each and every unit which you posted is exactly what I try to avoid in a marine filter. The marketing and advertising for these products is good, but their use on a properly set up marine aquarium leaves a lot to be desired.

You would be much better off to purchase a sump and protein skimmer, skipping the wet dry biomedia completely. A simply 30 gallon breeder tank with a sump style protein skimmer will be much more effective. The primary difference will be the amount of nitrate and phosphate that a wet dry system produces, causing serious long term care difficulties.

For the record, the Skilter is a horrible unit. The protein skimmer is extremely small, the contact time minimal, and the venturi horrible. Additionally, the mechanical filter pad serves almost no purpose on a marine setup. Its only practical use is on a 20 gallon Q tank.

What are you trying to accomplish with each of these aquariums? Lets start this conversation from the beginning.
Each aquarium? I just want a nice FOWR tank with which to have a nice amount of fish displayed and healthy and surviving without a hurculean effort in terms of work/effort as like most folks I do have a job and family who won't tolerate me doing daily water changes and spending an extravagant amt of $$. Not to say I am trying to do anything on the cheap but I do want to get good quality stuff and set up so that the equipment does what I need and is worth its cost/weight so to speak. I mention that cause that is one of the problems I guess I seem to be encountering...there so much hype and advertisement of what does what or is supposed to do X & do Y that its hard to deciper WHAT I really need at this point ya know/understand.

So with my tanks I've kept the cannister filters but taken you advise and others and removed the media and am using just the polishing pad and basically them to help water flow and aereation with the bubles and surface action at the top of the tanks. I still have the Korella 3 in the main tank and will be adding one in each of th 55 gal tanks when I get paid tomorrow! :) Have airstones but not too sure if they are really needed from what I read/hear on the forums. All tanks have a substantial amount of live rock (at least 25 lbs but more like 40-50lbs and at least 4" of live sand. So I am trying to correct some of the basics you and others have mentioned that I was ignorant of. I also have the UV on the main tank but not others.

So I guess at this point am trying to add a sump but am kinda in the dark about which one to purchase; as it will likely be my best option vs the DIY route with what is available to me in space and mechanics/ability...and if so what do I need in terms of return pumps, media in the sump, etc? Do I put live rock in it, bioballs, filter media or what as I've seen countless variations from folks here and online. Also noise will be an issue as am sure my significant other will reject the babbling brook in the living room effect so that's a thought.

Hope that helps any of you guys to see where I am going here or trying to do. Please by all means if I am off track or waay of road say so as I appreciate all the advice and knowledge I can get at this point!
However it seems each time I got to LFS they are just trying to sell me stuff that cooincides with their advice too! LOL (I guess that's what they're for huh?)
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Old 07-16-2009, 05:31 AM   #5
 
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Rob,

Yes, this hobby can sometimes be a difficult and frustrating as buying a use car. You have no idea what LFS to trust, and very often the people on the internet giving advice have very limited experience from which they are pulling from. One thing I like about this site is that most of us are very open with our backgrounds. We have threads posted in the Pictures and Videos area so you can see our aquariums in action and gain a confidence that the person you are talking to can actually provide advice to help.

You are on the right track. Just stay away from the wet dry filter media designs that you are looking at in a sump. Check out this thread:
http://www.fishforum.com/sumps-refug...g-sumps-15943/

My guess is that you won't have many questions after reading that link. I agree the DIY route is easiest and less expensive for you. The real discussion will be in choosing a skimmer for your sump, and hopefully I can be of help when we have that discussion.
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Old 07-16-2009, 05:56 AM   #6
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pasfur View Post
You are on the right track. Just stay away from the wet dry filter media designs that you are looking at in a sump. Check out this thread:
http://www.fishforum.com/sumps-refug...g-sumps-15943/

My guess is that you won't have many questions after reading that link. I agree the DIY route is easiest and less expensive for you. The real discussion will be in choosing a skimmer for your sump, and hopefully I can be of help when we have that discussion.
+1.
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Old 07-16-2009, 01:31 PM   #7
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pasfur View Post
Rob,

Yes, this hobby can sometimes be a difficult and frustrating as buying a use car. You have no idea what LFS to trust, and very often the people on the internet giving advice have very limited experience from which they are pulling from. One thing I like about this site is that most of us are very open with our backgrounds. We have threads posted in the Pictures and Videos area so you can see our aquariums in action and gain a confidence that the person you are talking to can actually provide advice to help.

You are on the right track. Just stay away from the wet dry filter media designs that you are looking at in a sump. Check out this thread:
http://www.fishforum.com/sumps-refug...g-sumps-15943/

My guess is that you won't have many questions after reading that link. I agree the DIY route is easiest and less expensive for you. The real discussion will be in choosing a skimmer for your sump, and hopefully I can be of help when we have that discussion.
Okay just read it again...my question...what is wrong with wet/dry and biobals and all that stuff? What do you recommend go in the sump other than heater, skimmer, and power return pump? What are the options and why that you recommend? Is there a min size recommendation for the size of my tanks? I think telling me to stay away from this or that design is great and good but its the education of why and the ancedotal experience which may be even more valuable here to prevent futher mistakes and advertisement bias/misinterpretation.
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Old 07-16-2009, 01:59 PM   #8
 
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the bigger the sump, the better. not only does it add a place to hide equipment, but adds water volume. in my sump, i have heater, skimmer, carbon and phosban reactors, and a refugium with chaeto and about a 5 inch sand bed.
i suggest a DIY sump using an old/used fish tank. just silicone in a few baffles and your good to go.
canister filters, filters sponges, bio balls, even filter socks can trap debris and detritus causing an increased spike in nitrates and phosphates as gunk breaks down. this usually contributes to algae outbreaks. this can be completely avoided and a properly setup systems shouldnt have much of a problem keeping 0 nitrates.
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Old 07-16-2009, 10:19 PM   #9
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onefish2fish View Post
canister filters, filters sponges, bio balls, even filter socks can trap debris and detritus causing an increased spike in nitrates and phosphates as gunk breaks down. this usually contributes to algae outbreaks. this can be completely avoided and a properly setup systems shouldnt have much of a problem keeping 0 nitrates.
Exactly.
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Old 07-19-2009, 03:12 AM   #10
 
Lost my purple tang this AM in this tank (main one). Water checks show: Alk=1.7-2.8, Specific grav=1.026, PH 8.6, Nitrite=0.0, Amonia=0.25, and Nitrates=40-80. This is driving me crazy! I've been doing 5-10 gal water changes EVERY 7 days now. What is going on? Should I just do something radical now like a 50-75% change or continue with the slow/steady 10-20% changes. It's an 80gal tank.

So depressing. ON a happier note I did get a sump for my 2nd tank (the one with the happy and active and ALIVE fish) and my new tank being set up. Need to find a return pump...LFS is pushing a PONDMASTER 300gph return pump that's a little costly and a slimer pre-filter box to fit the tanks..and a new skimmer for each sump...one that fits...then plum everything. On a sad note due to prior layout and cabinet design I don't think I can get a sump under or behind my main tank and off to the side "takes away from the decor" of the family room I am told by my significan other.

Any thoughts...so depressing! :(
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