Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   cycling my tropical tank (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/freshwater-tropical-fish/cycling-my-tropical-tank-97875/)

Joe1985 04-04-2012 01:10 AM

cycling my tropical tank
 
ive added water to my tank along with gravel, pump, and heater and im in the process of cycling my tank from what i know, im adding a pinch of fish food flake to the tank while leaving the pump on daily (have been for about 3 days now) my question is that is there an easier way of cycling your tank and that wont take as long? or a more beneficial way that creates more a quantity and better bacteria?
any help would b appreciated
cheers

1077 04-04-2012 02:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joe1985 (Post 1035128)
ive added water to my tank along with gravel, pump, and heater and im in the process of cycling my tank from what i know, im adding a pinch of fish food flake to the tank while leaving the pump on daily (have been for about 3 days now) my question is that is there an easier way of cycling your tank and that wont take as long? or a more beneficial way that creates more a quantity and better bacteria?
any help would b appreciated
cheers

If you know of a friend who has an already established tank, you might see if they would be willing to give you a sizeable portion of their filter material from their filter which you could stuff in your filter and or, a cup of their substrate, that you could place in mesh bag or nylon stocking and place near the return flow from your filter.
This material would need to be kept wet in old aquarium water or dechlorinated water during transport and transferring to your tank.
This would give bacteria a jump on establishing your own bacteria colony,and allow you to add a few,small fish, depending on tank volume, with a week to ten day's between new fishes added, a few at a time.
Could also add a bunch,(not a few),, live plant's to the tank, and the plant's would keep toxins such as ammonia from poisoning the fishes while allowing you to add a few,small fish same as before (not too many at once).
Water sprite,Pennywort,vallisneria,anubia,java fern,anacharis,would be easy plant's that would help keep toxins from harming the fish and can grow with low to moderate lighting.

Byron 04-04-2012 04:13 PM

Agree. And this guide by another of our members may give you some more background:
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...m-cycle-38617/

Byron.

Joe1985 04-04-2012 06:46 PM

Agree. And this guide by another of our members may give you some more background: A
 
thanks mate, ill look into it :)

Joe1985 04-04-2012 06:48 PM

If you know of a friend who has an already established tank, you might see if they would be willing to give you a sizeable portion of their filter material from their filter which you could stuff in your filter and or, a cup of their substrate, that you could place in mesh bag or nylon stocking and place near the return flow from your filter.
This material would need to be kept wet in old aquarium water or dechlorinated water during transport and transferring to your tank.
This would give bacteria a jump on establishing your own bacteria colony,and allow you to add a few,small fish, depending on tank volume, with a week to ten day's between new fishes added, a few at a time.
Could also add a bunch,(not a few),, live plant's to the tank, and the plant's would keep toxins such as ammonia from poisoning the fishes while allowing you to add a few,small fish same as before (not too many at once).
Water Sprite,Pennywort,vallisneria,anubia,Java Fern,Anacharis,would be easy plant's that would help keep toxins from harming the fish and can grow with low to moderate lighting.
__________________
The most important medication in your fish medicine cabinet is.. Clean water.




In response 1077 i dont really have friends in my proximaty that have tanks unfortunately :( well 1 i do and he has marine fish so i dont think that would help hahah so your saying that plants will assist me alot??

Byron 04-04-2012 07:01 PM

Yes. If you have sufficient live plants, and preferably fast growing ones, you do not have to worry about "cycling." The reason is that plants need nitrogen, and they prefer it as ammonium (which comes from ammonia) so they grab the ammonia fast. The added benefit is that with plants, there is no nitrite so that part of cycling is avoided.

I always set up new tanks with plants and a few fish from the start. Floating plants are easiest to handle, and they work very well for this because they use a lot of nutrients.

Joe1985 04-05-2012 07:55 AM

how do i know the light that i have thats built into the hood of my tank is sufficient to grow plants?? do they need some kind of food also?

Byron 04-05-2012 12:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joe1985 (Post 1036260)
how do i know the light that i have thats built into the hood of my tank is sufficient to grow plants?? do they need some kind of food also?

On the light, what is it? Fluorescent tube or incandescent (screw-in bulbs)? And what size is the tank (gallons)?

On the plant food, maybe. Some nutrients occur in the tap water via regular water changes, most come from fish food that gets into the substrate as waste and bacteria break it down. Depending upon your water hardness and fish load, and the light, a comprehensive liquid fertilizer may or may not be necessary. We can discuss more when I know the light data.

Joe1985 04-05-2012 07:34 PM

it came built into the hood of my tank, all it says is "24w lamp" my tank is a 50 Liter Aquatopia Neptune if that helps lookin to buy plants in the next few days

Byron 04-06-2012 09:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joe1985 (Post 1036756)
it came built into the hood of my tank, all it says is "24w lamp" my tank is a 50 Liter Aquatopia Neptune if that helps lookin to buy plants in the next few days

If it is a fluorescent tube with two prongs on each end that fits into the fixture, you can buy a new tube for it. I don't know that make, it may or may not be unique, but I would expect the tube can be replaced. Just measure the existing tube end to end (minus the prongs) or take it with you, and buy one the same length. Depending upon the size, and what you have available in Australia, you may be able to get something at a hardware store, or a fish store.

You want a tube that is full spectrum with a kelvin rating around 6500K, anywhere between 5000K and 7000K is fine.

Tubes have to be replaced regularly, usually every 12 months is best. They lose intensity to the point of being insufficient for the plants, and this long before the tube actually burns out.


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