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BWG 02-14-2012 07:50 PM

29 gallon planted nano
 
With my current tank doing amazingly well I've decided to start a new tank up and this time take the plunge and go planted. I'm planning to get a 29 gallon sometime this week and set it up with nano fish from Southeast Asia. There's so many choices for that, that I'm going to have to narrow them down some. Well actually a lot of narrowing down since I found a great store with a large nano selection.

I'm looking for small colorful fish so the favorites so far are:

Goldring danio
Glowlight danio
Hengels rasbora
Mosquito rasbora (how likely are Boraras to interbreed btw?)
Sundadanio axelrodi 'blue'
Yunnanilus cruciatus

Those are at the top and alread too many, although Dasiy's ricefish, Microdevario kubotai, and Horadandia aturkorali are also options for me. I don't even know if I'd do a centerpiece since I have a feeling any of the small, peaceful bettas or sparkling gourami would do well with the danios.

As for plants. I'm not sure. I don't know my hardness (need a test). I had thought maybe of a crypt only tank. The Sri Lankan species sound adaptable provided the tank is stable. I'm open to any ideas though.

Any suggestions for me in regards to either plants or stocking?

beetlebz 02-14-2012 10:44 PM

i dont have much experience with nano fish, per se. But for plants... as long as your water isnt way off one direction or the other, theres lots of options if you wanted to stick to a SE asian biotope. Crypts are a blast, I love them personally, but most if not all of the rotalas will fit the bill, including wallichii, which I have and love. Most or all of the crypts, I believe wysteria (hygrophilia difformis) is asian, Java fern, java moss, dwarf hairgrass, im sure someone can point out 10 more i missed :)

Byron 02-15-2012 11:53 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Those are some lovely fish, and I don't see any issues. But I would probably leave out any betta or gourami. When spawning these can be feisty.

On the Boraras interbreeding, yes, they will. These species should not be maintained together. I realize one could argue that in a home aquarium, who cares if they breed together or not. But random interbreeding is something that is discouraged among serious aquarists because there is always the danger that the resulting fry may get into the hobby. I have or have had three of the six Boraras species, and they have such a similar appearance that I would not want them mixed in one tank anyway.

Crypts would be ideal plants, along with water sprite floating. There are some aquascaping suggestions in some of our profiles for these fish, and I would be happy to provide further information if asked and assuming I can.:-) The photo below is of myt former Asian setup that would suit these fish; this was a 33g but I had something nearly identical in a 29g.

Byron.

BWG 02-15-2012 02:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beetlebz (Post 982680)
i dont have much experience with nano fish, per se. But for plants... as long as your water isnt way off one direction or the other, theres lots of options if you wanted to stick to a SE asian biotope. Crypts are a blast, I love them personally, but most if not all of the rotalas will fit the bill, including wallichii, which I have and love. Most or all of the crypts, I believe wysteria (hygrophilia difformis) is asian, Java fern, java moss, dwarf hairgrass, im sure someone can point out 10 more i missed :)

Thanks for the suggestions! :)
I wasn't familiar with any ot the rotalas. I started looking them up and some of them do seem like possibilities. I'm hoping to go for medium light and avoid CO2 for the moment. Babysteps. If I have to I'm even willing to look at plants from other areas. I just decided to limit myself to SE Asian for both fish and plants in an effort to go crazy from all the possible choices.

BWG 02-15-2012 02:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 982975)
Those are some lovely fish, and I don't see any issues. But I would probably leave out any betta or gourami. When spawning these can be feisty.

On the Boraras interbreeding, yes, they will. These species should not be maintained together. I realize one could argue that in a home aquarium, who cares if they breed together or not. But random interbreeding is something that is discouraged among serious aquarists because there is always the danger that the resulting fry may get into the hobby. I have or have had three of the six Boraras species, and they have such a similar appearance that I would not want them mixed in one tank anyway.

Crypts would be ideal plants, along with water sprite floating. There are some aquascaping suggestions in some of our profiles for these fish, and I would be happy to provide further information if asked and assuming I can.:-) The photo below is of myt former Asian setup that would suit these fish; this was a 33g but I had something nearly identical in a 29g.

Byron.

Thank for for the tip about the bettas. I had heard that some species like B. rutilans or B. coccina would work well in a communtiy of small fish, particularly Boraras and Trigonostigma. I had only worried about them being outcompeted for food by the danios.

I had just asked about the Boraras interbreeding since I had been told that if adequate shoals are kept of each that no hyrbids would occur. I was just curious if that was true. With all the options I have I'm certainly not going to go with species that are so similar looking. Speaking of all my options, do you have a suggestion as to the number of species that I should narrow things down to?

That is an absolutely beautiful tank! I was thinking I would need some taller plants that would nearly reach the surface, but the floating plants you have in there compensate for that and allow for more free swimming area...sorry just really new to plants and how you'd aquascape with them lol.

Byron 02-15-2012 07:22 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by blackwaterguy (Post 983118)
Thank for for the tip about the bettas. I had heard that some species like B. rutilans or B. coccina would work well in a communtiy of small fish, particularly Boraras and Trigonostigma. I had only worried about them being outcompeted for food by the danios.

I had just asked about the Boraras interbreeding since I had been told that if adequate shoals are kept of each that no hyrbids would occur. I was just curious if that was true. With all the options I have I'm certainly not going to go with species that are so similar looking. Speaking of all my options, do you have a suggestion as to the number of species that I should narrow things down to?

That is an absolutely beautiful tank! I was thinking I would need some taller plants that would nearly reach the surface, but the floating plants you have in there compensate for that and allow for more free swimming area...sorry just really new to plants and how you'd aquascape with them lol.

As all the regulars here know, I consider floating plants just about mandatory in almost any fish tank. Aside from their rapid use of ammonia/ammonium from the water and the fact they they release considerably more oxygen into the water (via their roots) than other plants, with the fish you are intending they must have cover. They spend a lot of time near the surface, grazing food from the plant roots and leaves, and they need the shade from the overhead light. Water Sprite is about the best floater; and fry can survive in its root masses. It also works very well if you can get a piece of wood standing so that it is close to the surface, then allow a Water Sprite to cling onto the wood and it will spread remarkably. Java Moss on wood also works.

You will want decent-sized groups of each species. These are small fish, and the more there are the better. I would say nine per species is the absolute minimum. Depending which ones you decide on, you could have 2, 3 or 4 upper-level species, plus the group of loaches. This all assumes lots of chunks of wood and branches.

If you can get one of the diminutive betta species, they will work. Earlier I jumped fast, when I see Betta I assume the worst;-) but some of the rarer species are fine with these others.

Inter-breeding can sometimes be prevented with sufficient;y-sized groups, but Boraras is a bit different according to my biologist friend, so I would stick with one of the six. I have not found these species easy, not sure why; my water parameters are ideal for these.

Herečs the same basic aquascape only in the 29g, I moved it from the 33g.

Byron.

BWG 02-15-2012 08:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 983397)
As all the regulars here know, I consider floating plants just about mandatory in almost any fish tank. Aside from their rapid use of ammonia/ammonium from the water and the fact they they release considerably more oxygen into the water (via their roots) than other plants, with the fish you are intending they must have cover. They spend a lot of time near the surface, grazing food from the plant roots and leaves, and they need the shade from the overhead light. Water Sprite is about the best floater; and fry can survive in its root masses. It also works very well if you can get a piece of wood standing so that it is close to the surface, then allow a Water Sprite to cling onto the wood and it will spread remarkably. Java Moss on wood also works.

You will want decent-sized groups of each species. These are small fish, and the more there are the better. I would say nine per species is the absolute minimum. Depending which ones you decide on, you could have 2, 3 or 4 upper-level species, plus the group of loaches. This all assumes lots of chunks of wood and branches.

If you can get one of the diminutive betta species, they will work. Earlier I jumped fast, when I see Betta I assume the worst;-) but some of the rarer species are fine with these others.

Inter-breeding can sometimes be prevented with sufficient;y-sized groups, but Boraras is a bit different according to my biologist friend, so I would stick with one of the six. I have not found these species easy, not sure why; my water parameters are ideal for these.

Herečs the same basic aquascape only in the 29g, I moved it from the 33g.

Byron.

Yes sir, I've read your profiles enough and lurked on the forum to know how you like plants. :) It really does seem pretty mandatory for nano fish, which is why I'm finally willing to take the plunge. The water sprite certainly seems perfect for what I'd like to do. Right now I'm thinking of that, crypts, java fern, and java moss. I'm unsure exactly which varieties/species I'll be able to find, especially of crypts.

I knew the danios and the Hengels were upper level, but was unsure of the others. So I picked only upper level fish? Did I miss any SE Asian species that would be midlevel? I've never actually seen any of these species in person (I'm ordering online), so I don't know if 30+ fish swimming in the upper half of the tank would make it look crowded.

Those diminuitive bettas would be ok when breeding as well? Or should I be thinking at max one fish so that there's no chance of breeding?

One last question if you don't mind me asking, what type of driftwood is that in your pictures? The Malaysian I have in my current tank is chunky and not what I would want. I've been debating either DYI or manzanita.

Byron 02-16-2012 10:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by blackwaterguy (Post 983448)
Yes sir, I've read your profiles enough and lurked on the forum to know how you like plants. :) It really does seem pretty mandatory for nano fish, which is why I'm finally willing to take the plunge. The water sprite certainly seems perfect for what I'd like to do. Right now I'm thinking of that, crypts, java fern, and java moss. I'm unsure exactly which varieties/species I'll be able to find, especially of crypts.

I knew the danios and the Hengels were upper level, but was unsure of the others. So I picked only upper level fish? Did I miss any SE Asian species that would be midlevel? I've never actually seen any of these species in person (I'm ordering online), so I don't know if 30+ fish swimming in the upper half of the tank would make it look crowded.

Those diminuitive bettas would be ok when breeding as well? Or should I be thinking at max one fish so that there's no chance of breeding?

One last question if you don't mind me asking, what type of driftwood is that in your pictures? The Malaysian I have in my current tank is chunky and not what I would want. I've been debating either DYI or manzanita.

Small fish frequently tend to like it near the surface with the protection of floating plants. Of those you initially listed and I know of from personal experience, the Hengels Rasbora is mid-water, almost exclusively. They rarely go near the substrate, in fact I don't think I've ever seen my group of 10 near the bottom. The Boraras species will be among plants, but tend to stay in the upper half of the tank.

On the rare betta, having no experience myself I would refer you to those who do. Someone in the Betta forum may know of these.

That piece of wood is now collecting dust. I had serious fungus issues with it twice, and finally removed it. I thought it was Mopani wood, but in hindsight it might actually be grapewood which is notorious for toxic fungus. All the other wood in my tanks is Malaysian Driftwood, I've never had issues with it. It is hard to find branches though. I will be collecting some dry branches in the woods this Spring if I can find what I'm looking for.

Byron.

bigehugedome 02-16-2012 11:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 983894)
Small fish frequently tend to like it near the surface with the protection of floating plants. Of those you initially listed and I know of from personal experience, the Hengels Rasbora is mid-water, almost exclusively. They rarely go near the substrate, in fact I don't think I've ever seen my group of 10 near the bottom. The Boraras species will be among plants, but tend to stay in the upper half of the tank.


Byron.

Now that I think of it my Hengles Rasbora have never been near the bottom. Even when all my other fish pick at wafers and pellets the rasbora are always in the middle. Neat!
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BWG 02-21-2012 08:44 PM

I'm working on a list of lowlight plants from the region right now just to see what my options are. I have to do further research but right now this is my list:Cryptocoryne affinis, Cryptocoryne aponogetifolia, Cryptocoryne balansae, Cryptcoryne becketii, Cryptocoryne lutea, Cryptocoryne petchii, Cryptocoryne pygmaea, Cryptocoryne retrospiralis, Cryptocoryne spiralis, Cryptocoryne walkeri, Cryptocoryne wendtii, Cryptocoryne willisi, Cryptocoryne pontederiifolia, Cryptocoryne undulata, Java Fern, Java Moss, Watersprite, Rotala indica, Rotala rotundifolia, Rotala rotundifolia sp. 'Green', and Aponogeton crispus. Would a 20W Life-Glo T8 be sufficient to grow any of these? Or will I need a better lighting system for a 29 gallon? I have read the stickies here, but lighting still confuses me a little.


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