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-   -   What are these 2 plants? (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-planted-aquarium/what-these-2-plants-92339/)

Chris7 02-02-2012 10:24 PM

What are these 2 plants?
 
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I just bought the 2 plants, But I can't remember what they are called?? Any ideas?

redchigh 02-02-2012 10:25 PM

either they're both anubias, or the one on the left is an anubias and the other is some type of swordplant.

I'd bet on anubias. They really shouldn't be planted in the gravel...

Chris7 02-02-2012 10:35 PM

What should they be planted in? They had them in gravel at the store.

Chris7 02-03-2012 01:48 AM

OK I've been reading up on these plants a bit and see you should anchor them to a rock or drift wood like Java ferns. I read people use thread, when it disolves it won't put any bad into the water?
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Boredomb 02-03-2012 02:01 AM

You can use either thread or fishing line. I have used both

Geomancer 02-03-2012 08:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chris7 (Post 971505)
OK I've been reading up on these plants a bit and see you should anchor them to a rock or drift wood like Java ferns. I read people use thread, when it disolves it won't put any bad into the water?
Posted via Mobile Device

If the thread is cotton, it won't be a problem. No more than any other organic substance breaking down (food, plant matter, etc). It happens very slowly (months).

Byron 02-03-2012 12:18 PM

It may just be the photo colours, but the leaves look a bit on the yellowing side. If this is actual, it is caused by too bright overhead light, which wold likely have been in the store since you just got them. Anubias, like Java Fern and Java Moss, is a true shade plant, so when you attach it to rock or wood, place it in a shady location, not under the direct overhead light. When Anubias is overshadowed by larger plants, or under floating plants, it will do better. Algae (brush algae especially) will also be less likely to attach, something that often occurs in direct lighting.

I also see a leaf of a Java Fern to the right of the Anubias, this also should not be buried, at least the rhizome (the thick "stem" on both species from which leaves and true roots will grow) should not be buried. It will be OK if the rhizome is above the substrate, attached to wood/rock or not doesn't matter, but that is the easiest way of securing it to something.

Byron.

Chris7 02-03-2012 09:40 PM

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Ya that was just the photo, I don't think I had the camera on the right setting. The leaves are green, as for the Java fern it's attached to a small rock but some gravel got pushed up beside it. Here's what I did with the Anubais what do you think?

Byron 02-04-2012 10:51 AM

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That's fine. In time the Anubias roots will adhere it to the rock.

I had an Anubias in the back corner of my 90g some years ago, and it just spread out, slowly over a few years, until the rhizome was 3+ feet. I tore that tank down, so I broke the Anubias into individual plants and aquascaped my 3-foot 33g totally with Anubias (except for a couple crypts in front and floating plants). Here's what that looked like:

Chris7 02-04-2012 06:04 PM

Awesome tank there Byron, you make me jelous. I plan on trying something bigger (55 or so) and more realistic by next fall, but for now I'am just trying to learn. This started out as a girt for my wife(see love amimals), but has turned into an obsession of mine :-D.
Chris


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