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-   -   High temp max for a BN pleco? (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/catfish/high-temp-max-bn-pleco-90608/)

GwenInNM 01-14-2012 11:42 PM

High temp max for a BN pleco?
 

I originally bought my BN pleco to go in my 30 gal tank with my German Blue rams, which when I want to encourage spawning, my tank will get at least 86 degrees. Now it's at 83 degrees. Anyways, once I saw the temp range for the BN pleco, I moved him into my tank that is at 78 degrees and has a ph of 7.4

I'd really like the BN pleco in the tank that has a higher temp. The ph is at 6.3 in my 30 gal

What would be best for this guy? I'd like a fish to help control algae, and the 2 ammano shrimp I have do an okay job, but the pleco in there would be ideal as my other tank has 5 otos, and doesn't really need the BN pleco

Thoughts on this??

Gwen

Byron 01-15-2012 06:57 PM

A short-term temperature rise such as to treat ich for a week or so can be tolerated by many (but not all) "tropical" fish. But a long-term, i.e. permanent, rise is a very different matter. This does affect the fish's physiology. I have not the biological knowledge to offer specifics, but I do know that the higher the temperature for any fish [meaning, the higher within their preferred range] the harder the fish has to work just to live. And this takes a toll on the fish's health. Which is why I always recommend that fish be kept no higher than the middle of their preferred temperature range. One or two degrees may not seem like much to us with our warm blood, but to a fish this can be significant.

Temperature fluctuations do occur in the habitat of all of our aquarium fishes, and the fish are geared for these. The consistent stable conditions in the aquarium is foreign to all fish, which makes higher (or lower at the opposite end) extremes even more of an issue for the fish.

On another note Gwen, if your intention is to spawn the rams, i would not include any catfish or nocturnal fish. The eggs and then the fry are vulnerable at night.

Byron.

GwenInNM 01-15-2012 07:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 951707)
A short-term temperature rise such as to treat ich for a week or so can be tolerated by many (but not all) "tropical" fish. But a long-term, i.e. permanent, rise is a very different matter. This does affect the fish's physiology. I have not the biological knowledge to offer specifics, but I do know that the higher the temperature for any fish [meaning, the higher within their preferred range] the harder the fish has to work just to live. And this takes a toll on the fish's health. Which is why I always recommend that fish be kept no higher than the middle of their preferred temperature range. One or two degrees may not seem like much to us with our warm blood, but to a fish this can be significant.

Temperature fluctuations do occur in the habitat of all of our aquarium fishes, and the fish are geared for these. The consistent stable conditions in the aquarium is foreign to all fish, which makes higher (or lower at the opposite end) extremes even more of an issue for the fish.

On another note Gwen, if your intention is to spawn the rams, i would not include any catfish or nocturnal fish. The eggs and then the fry are vulnerable at night.

Byron.

Thank you Byron. I'll leave him where he is. I've had my GBR's spawn twice, but each time I don't think the eggs are fertile, and by day 2 they get eaten. I'm hopeful one day it will happen, and that my male is not infertile. Good advice to not introduce any others to what has so far been a successful tank.

Gwen


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