Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Newly converted natural planted tank (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-planted-aquarium/newly-converted-natural-planted-tank-89984/)

coydog429 01-07-2012 07:11 PM

Newly converted natural planted tank
 
2 Attachment(s)
Hello all, I am new here and have read most of the planted threads that I could find. I have a 55 gallon guppy tank that I just reciently switched form fake to planted after my HOB filters decided to die on me during the nite and I have an extra powerhead in my shed. My question is: How can I be sure that my tank will be ok while it is transitioning to the NPT?
I also need some help in identifiying one of the plants that I got. It was in the "grab bag" at the local nursery :oops: Sorry about the bad pics
Thanks ahead of time. :-)
Attachment 45147

Attachment 45148

kangy 01-07-2012 07:17 PM

Sorry can't help with the ID but wanted to say I really like that hardscape

coydog429 01-07-2012 07:25 PM

Thank you very much. :-)

Byron 01-07-2012 08:00 PM

Yes, nice hardscape. And welcome to Tropical Fish Keeping forum; nice to have you joining us.:-D

If I read you correctly, you've removed the filter and are now relying on the plants. Provided the tank has been running a while, so it is established, and the fish load is low to moderate for the tank's water volume, you should be OK. Most of the beneficial bacteria is in the substrate, not the filter, so just don't touch the substrate at water changes. You have several stem plants which are faster growing so they will soon be assimilating much of the ammonia/ammonium.

The plant in the photo for ID is I think one of the Ophiopogon species, common names like Fountain Plant or sometimes grass plant. It is strictly speaking a terrestrial plant, but it usually does fairly well submersed, often lasting for months depending upon the species (there are 3 I am aware of, maybe more). From the photo I would guess it is O. japonicus, the species that often does well in aquaria.

Byron.

coydog429 01-07-2012 08:48 PM

Thanks Byron for the ID! Glad you like the hardscape, I decided to keep it that way when I switched to all live plants. The fish and glass shrimp seem to like it like that and my rubber nose pleco loves to hide under the rocks.
So what I should do with the O. japonicus is put it in pots with just the roots in the water? Kinda like I have my pathos plant that you see in the roots hanging on the left side of the tank.

Geomancer 01-08-2012 07:21 AM

You'll probably want to get a sponge filter, strictly for the mechanical filtration. It will help keep the water clear by removing the small particles in the water.

Byron 01-08-2012 01:43 PM

Yes, a sponge filter is not a bad idea. Some water movement down the tank is usually advisable.

On the potted plant, that's up to you. If this is what I think it is, it may do very well submersed. It is a striking plant, a nice contrast to the others, so you might want to leave it.

coydog429 01-08-2012 03:47 PM

Alright thank you both very much. The powerhead that i do have isn't putting out that much of a current with the sponge attached. I will see if I can find an actuall sponge filter the next time I head into the city. I think I will leave the plants for now, if they start to yellow then I will see about just doing them partialy submerged then. Again thank you very much.


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