Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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sam7152004 12-19-2011 12:45 PM

I would like to add CO2
 
I would like to add CO2 to my 30 gallon tank. Is there any way besides the expensive systems sold in most aquarium stores? I am only 15 and can't afford a huge investment right now:oops:.

Byron 12-19-2011 01:58 PM

:wave:Welcome to Tropical Fish Keeping forum.

My first question would be, why do you want CO2? Don't misunderstand me, this is really not a silly question. Because many aquarists get the notion from reading this and that on the web that without CO2 they can't grow plants. And nothing is further from reality. However, if you have a specific goal of propagating plants or raising difficult (fussy) plants that only do well with high light, CO2 and daily nutrient fertilizing, that is a different matter.

CO2 sets up a different and much higher "balance" between light and the 17 nutrients plants need. So knowing your present light is essential to this.

You can see photos of my tanks under "Aquariums" below my name on the left, and I have never used CO2 diffusion or supplements in those planted tanks.

Byron.

Mikaila31 12-19-2011 05:14 PM

I agree with bryon. There are many other ways to improve plant growth before turning to CO2. CO2 can't always help plant growth either if its not the limiting nutrient.

You can add CO2 using DIY yeast systems or certain liquid carbon additives. The liquid carbon will not be any cheaper then a pressurized system in the long run. Yeast systems have costs that add up in the long run and high maintenance for the yeast system. Both can also result in fluctuating carbon levels.

Using no CO2 does not take away the ability to have a nice looking, densely planted tank. I have pressurized systems and could run CO2 on all my tanks, but I don't. They all are very densely planted.

sam7152004 12-19-2011 07:09 PM

I would like to add CO2 to my tank to enhance plant growth. My plants started out fine, but as they grew they started to look kind of yellowish. Not unhealthylooking, but not florishing. I use vitamins twice a week so the only thing I can think of that I might be lacking is CO2.

Byron 12-19-2011 07:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sam7152004 (Post 925547)
I would like to add CO2 to my tank to enhance plant growth. My plants started out fine, but as they grew they started to look kind of yellowish. Not unhealthylooking, but not florishing. I use vitamins twice a week so the only thing I can think of that I might be lacking is CO2.

There can be many different things causing this, so we need to explore each and find the problem(s). At the end, You might be able to resolve them with little or no expense.

First, tell us about your light. Please be specific. Is it fluorescent tube, or incandescent (screw-in bulb), and how many tubes/bulbs? What is the description of the tube/bulbs (wattage, kelvin, name, manufacturer). How long is the light on each day?

You mention vitamins, from which I assume some sort of plant fertilizer. Which product, and how much and how often do you add it?

Last, what type of plants? While many plants manage in varying conditions, some need more light, some more nutrients, etc. Combining plants that have similar requirements and when these are what you have available, you will be more likely of success. And how long has this tank been set up? New plants frequently lose their leaves as new ones grow. But I can't say that is the issue until I know all the above.

Byron.

sam7152004 12-20-2011 06:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 925589)
First, tell us about your light. Please be specific. Is it fluorescent tube, or incandescent (screw-in bulb), and how many tubes/bulbs? What is the description of the tube/bulbs (wattage, kelvin, name, manufacturer). How long is the light on each day?

3 fluorescent tubes. 2 aqua-glo bulbs and 1 power-glo bulb. 30w T8 91cm. The light is on from 7 AM to 9PM, so 14-hours.

sam7152004 12-20-2011 06:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 925589)
You mention vitamins, from which I assume some sort of plant fertilizer. Which product, and how much and how often do you add it?


I use flourish nitrogen and flourish comprehensive supplement for the planted aquarium. For the first one, I use 2mL twice a week. for the second one, I use 2.5mL twice a week.

sam7152004 12-20-2011 06:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 925589)
Last, what type of plants?


I'm not exactly sure. I will ask my neighbor when I get home. He gave me the plants when I first started my tank (which resulted in snails:shock:). I know the one is called hornwort.

Mikaila31 12-20-2011 04:23 PM

Hornwort normally grows crazy and out of control. Given your info it should be doing this excessively in your tank. If I follow your lighting right you have 90watts total? If so that is a bit excessive if you don't yet have plant density. Something in your tank is definitely going to be lacking, you have a lot of light and not the fertilizer input required for it. I would guess potassium or phosphate since those are not being added to the tank. Any particular growth abnormalities in the plants?

SinCrisis 12-20-2011 04:36 PM

I think we may also need to know what kind of filter you are running and how much surface agitation you have. HOB filters will produce a lot of surface agitation that removes gases from your aquarium. Same if you have air stones, or any other aeration tool such as surface skimmers.


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