Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   10 Gallon Tank - How Many Harlequin Rasbora (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/cyprinids-atherinids/10-gallon-tank-how-many-harlequin-87062/)

Reece 11-30-2011 03:59 PM

10 Gallon Tank - How Many Harlequin Rasbora
 
Hey everyone,

unfortunately a few days ago Daz (my betta fish) passed away and so I'm left with an empty tank. I've decided I want some Harlequin Rasbora but don't know how many to get. It is a 10 gallon tank but is not rectangular, it's a cube (about 35cm Length, width and height). Anybody know how many I could have? Also I quite like neon tetra, so if harlequins aren't possible with my tank how many neons could I have?

Thanks!

Byron 11-30-2011 08:11 PM

It is possible, but a larger tank would be best. This species fares better in a larger group than some shoaling fish, and I would suggest a 20g. The two related species, Lambchop Rasbora and Hengels Rasbora, remain a bit smaller and would better suit a 10g. Well planted, and regular water changes should work. Most of the tetra fall into the same category.

There are other smaller rasbora, the dwarf species in Boraras, that would be perfect in a larger group in a nicely planted 10g, with some suitable companions like one of the dwarf species of cory, and some other small upper fish. Depending upon water parameters, as these need soft water. There are some basic water small fish among the cyprinids in our profiles.

Reece 12-01-2011 09:53 AM

Unfortunately my LFS hasn't got any of those fish, they have things like mollies, guppies, harlequin Rasbora, zebra danios, catfish, neon tetras, Serpae tetras, angel fish.
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Byron 12-01-2011 11:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Reece (Post 908810)
Unfortunately my LFS hasn't got any of those fish, they have things like mollies, guppies, harlequin Rasbora, zebra danios, catfish, neon tetras, Serpae tetras, angel fish.
Posted via Mobile Device

Some of those will not work in a 10g, all that is covered in our profile of the respective species. Guppy alone will; a group of neons or rasbora can with plants and water changes, so one of these would be my choice in this situation.

Reece 12-01-2011 03:25 PM

which of those fish would you recommend for species only in my tank and how many.?
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Byron 12-01-2011 05:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Reece (Post 909110)
which of those fish would you recommend for species only in my tank and how many.?
Posted via Mobile Device

With either the rasbora or the neons, 7 of whichever. And I would subsequently find a suitable substrate fish. A trio of corys (the "normal" sized species) would work. And/or a Whiptail Catfish, they do fine as a single fish. In case you're wondering, substrate fish usually (but not always) don't figure into the upper fish equation; first, they don't need "swimming" space but substrate surface (including wood, rock, plant leaves) for browsing, and second, they tend to be minimal in terms of their effect on the bioload. Within reason, obviously.:-)

Reece 12-01-2011 06:01 PM

So what I've learnt so far is this acceptable:

7 Harlequin Rasbora
1 Whiptails Catfish
3 Corys (What type of cory, I'm thinking pygmy?

Also, here are other tank details (in case they're necessary).

Tank length: 35cm Tank height: 30cm (measurements approx)
Substrate: Gravel that you get in those bags (colours red, blue and white)

What foods do whiptail catfish need? (or do they eat the "leavings" from the other fish?

Reece 12-01-2011 06:14 PM

Another possibly important fact is that I have no live plants, only artificial.

By the way, I have no air pump, however I spoke to someone via messaging on YouTube who have a freshwater tank that seems to be done at expert level (it was very good) and he told me that as long as there is a gap of about an inch between where the water falls from the filter and the surface of the water it should oxygenate the water fine. Is that true and if so can I do that?

Byron 12-01-2011 06:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Reece (Post 909284)
Another possibly important fact is that I have no live plants, only artificial.

By the way, I have no air pump, however I spoke to someone via messaging on YouTube who have a freshwater tank that seems to be done at expert level (it was very good) and he told me that as long as there is a gap of about an inch between where the water falls from the filter and the surface of the water it should oxygenate the water fine. Is that true and if so can I do that?

Yes, any sort of disturbance of the surface increases the gaseous exchange whereby oxygen enters the water and CO2 dissipates out. Airstone, bubble wands, and similar devices do the same by increasing the air to water surface ratio.

Not having live plants is an issue. I would get some, even as simple as floating. Floating plants do a major job of keeping the water clean. Water Sprite is ideal, but some stem plants will do well floating; my favourite is Brazilian Pennywort. These will grow with any overhead light.

To your penultimate post question on food for Whiptail; they eat the same that the corys eat. Sinking foods should be provided, don't rely on flake falling to the substrate. I have substrate fish in almost all my tanks and I feed two foods for the day's feeding, one a flake or pellet for upper fish, one a sinking food. Shrimp pellets, Hikari's algae-based disks, Omega One's kelp-base disks, Nutrafin's basic tablet, all these are good. As a treat, frozen bloodworms, maybe once or twice at most weekly, will be relished by corys and whiptails. The only time I see my whiptail literally spring into action is when he senses bloodworms.:lol:

Reece 12-02-2011 01:19 AM

Thanks so much for this advice!

I'm sensing that I will go towards the water sprite plant, I've always wanted a plant but I've always had the idea that they're very difficult to maintain, I just have a few questions more and that will be all:

If my LFS doesn't not have water sprite, what other floating plants don't need a specific light to grow and no CO2 added to the water? (and are easy to keep alive ha)

How many sinking pellets do I need to feed 3 Corys and a whiptail catfish? (per serving)

As an overall, this seems to be a little expensive at the moment. I will aim to add the plants as a priority first, along with buying foods. In what order do I get fish if I can't afford them all on the day? For example: Harlequin Rasbora, Pygmy Cory, Whiptail catfish?

My final question is for plant care, (I literally know nothing of them) how long must I leave the light on and off? I can't imagine it would want a constant light?


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