Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Hairy aquarium, is it bad? help pls! (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-planted-aquarium/hairy-aquarium-bad-help-pls-86644/)

broujos 11-25-2011 03:47 AM

Hairy aquarium, is it bad? help pls!
 
there is some kind of hair plants grown up all over my decorations, tank glass and really much on my plants! is this hairy thing good, bad or nothing? :P please help! thank you

Limeylemon 11-25-2011 04:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by broujos (Post 902318)
there is some kind of hair plants grown up all over my decorations, tank glass and really much on my plants! is this hairy thing good, bad or nothing? :P please help! thank you

You have hair algae... A friend of mine has loads, and I have a tiny bit on one plant. Can't say if it is bad, never noticed an issue with my friends tank and she gets it all over the glass too. She did say it is a problem with a nitrate build up in the filter but don't follow me on that until one of the knowledgeable guys replies.

Very unsightly but never caused me any issues!

AnfibioRana 11-25-2011 04:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by broujos (Post 902318)
there is some kind of hair plants grown up all over my decorations, tank glass and really much on my plants! is this hairy thing good, bad or nothing? :P please help! thank you

I assume you're speaking of algae.
You should describe their appearance, so that I can help you solve your problem.
Ciao!
AnfibioRana

broujos 11-25-2011 05:50 AM

?????????? ??????????????


it looks like this, but it has covered my whole tank! even the filter has a bit!

Calmwaters 11-25-2011 08:10 AM

Does it look like this:
http://ts2.mm.bing.net/images/thumbn...0908b16ab9a588
If so that is black brush algae and if you have real plants it can kill them. I recently had a battle with this in one of my tanks and lost almost all of my plants. How often to you vaccum your gravel? Do you have real or fake plants? How big is your tank?

AnfibioRana 11-25-2011 11:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by broujos (Post 902322)
?????????? ??????????????


it looks like this, but it has covered my whole tank! even the filter has a bit!

These are definitely black brush algae.
They may, in the long run, kill all plants, but can be eliminated by a combined attack.
If plants and fish in your tank come from acidic waters, with low hardness, you can act as follows.
Fill the tank with a mixture of tap water and RO water (you will need some count).
Lower and stabilize the pH to 6.5, by filtering with black peat and administering CO2 (carbon dioxide) with a diffuser.
The amber color of water, produced by peat, intercepts most wavelengths necessary for the growth of algae, but completely useless for the plants.
Use 18.000 K fluorescent lamps.
Use a powerful external filter, powered by a centrifugal pump and filled with a sintered glass filter medium.
This material allows the growth of anaerobic bacteria as well, which can destroy the nitrate made by ordinary aerobic bacteria.
Of course, the usual rules of good management of an aquarium (a few fish, many plants and regular water changes) must always be observed.
AnfibioRana

broujos 11-25-2011 12:11 PM

thanks you really much, but this is a really hard thing to do! i will try :).. is there any algae eater to kill it?

Calmwaters 11-25-2011 12:32 PM

No offence but I don't think that all that Anfibiorana posted is really needed. I have just had a battle with this same type of algea and lost alot of plants before I figured out with the help of others on here that it was due to my light bulbs looseing there strength it had been over a year, close to 1.5 year, since I had replaced them and they need to be replaced at least once a year so I replaced the bulbs and trimmed all the leaves off of the plants that had the algea growing on them and scrubbed the algea off the driftwood and now have no more brush algea in my tank. So if it has been over a year since you replaced your lights I would start there and replace the bulbs with 6500 daylight bulbs and you should hopefully be good to go.
ETA: No algea eaters eat this algea I have heard that american flag fish will eat it but also heard that they also eat other plants so I never tried them.

Mikaila31 11-25-2011 07:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AnfibioRana (Post 902459)
These are definitely black brush algae.
They may, in the long run, kill all plants, but can be eliminated by a combined attack.
If plants and fish in your tank come from acidic waters, with low hardness, you can act as follows.
Fill the tank with a mixture of tap water and RO water (you will need some count).
Lower and stabilize the pH to 6.5, by filtering with black peat and administering CO2 (carbon dioxide) with a diffuser.
The amber color of water, produced by peat, intercepts most wavelengths necessary for the growth of algae, but completely useless for the plants.
Use 18.000 K fluorescent lamps.
Use a powerful external filter, powered by a centrifugal pump and filled with a sintered glass filter medium.
This material allows the growth of anaerobic bacteria as well, which can destroy the nitrate made by ordinary aerobic bacteria.
Of course, the usual rules of good management of an aquarium (a few fish, many plants and regular water changes) must always be observed.
AnfibioRana

I disagree with a lot of this. Most is major overkill for dealing with BBA. Tannins do effect how light moves through the water. However they are not going to filter out wavelengths needed by the algae and not those needed by the plant. BBA absorbs mostly light in the blue spectrum. Higher plants often use red and blue light. If you were able to get rid of blue light your plants are gonna look funny as they change their chlorophyll in response. 1800K lamps are the opposite of what you want. Anything 1800K is going to be very high in the blue spectrum.

I agree with changing the bulb if it is old. Also manual removal of the algae. Avoid any 'algae' killers as these are going to harm your plants despite many advertise as 'plant' safe. Plant growth has a negative effect on algae growth so focus on removing algae and aiding growth of the higher plants.

AnfibioRana 11-26-2011 10:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mikaila31 (Post 902880)
I disagree with a lot of this. Most is major overkill for dealing with BBA. Tannins do effect how light moves through the water. However they are not going to filter out wavelengths needed by the algae and not those needed by the plant. BBA absorbs mostly light in the blue spectrum. Higher plants often use red and blue light. If you were able to get rid of blue light your plants are gonna look funny as they change their chlorophyll in response. 1800K lamps are the opposite of what you want. Anything 1800K is going to be very high in the blue spectrum.

I agree with changing the bulb if it is old. Also manual removal of the algae. Avoid any 'algae' killers as these are going to harm your plants despite many advertise as 'plant' safe. Plant growth has a negative effect on algae growth so focus on removing algae and aiding growth of the higher plants.

The problem of controlling algae is as old as the freshwater aquarium and still unsolved.
Obviously, the lamps must be replaced regularly, but it is naive to think that it is possible to nip an algal infestation by the mere replacement of exausted lamps.
An algae infestation depends on many factors: high concentrations of nitrate, high pH value, lack of CO2, insufficient filtration, accumulation of organic sediments within the filter and into the gravel, small quantities of plants and their poor growth, and so on.
On the other hand, it is scientifically proven that the fluorescent lamps from 6000 to 8000 K (designed for greenhouses of terrestrial plants) have only one effect in aquaria: stimulating the growth of several species of algae.
Of course, peat should be used responsibly, without exaggeration.
Until evidence to the contrary, adding monthly a handful of peat in the filter has never created any inconvenience in acidic aquaria.
Risks are only theoretical and are neutralized by regular water changes.
All the best.
AnfibioRana


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