Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   FILTRATION QUARANTINE TANK: 10 Gallon - Elite Mini Filter (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/filtration-quarantine-tank-10-gallon-elite-86166/)

Tracy Bird 11-17-2011 03:04 PM

FILTRATION QUARANTINE TANK: 10 Gallon - Elite Mini Filter
 
I am trying to find the best option for setting up a 10 gallon FW quarantine tank for new fish and as an emegency hospital.

Here are my needs and considerations:

- Like most everyone else, I do not want the q-tank running at all times.

- It needs to be cost effective

- I don't want to add significantly to my main tank waterflow. I already have enough water filtration and waterflow through my Aquaclear50 and an air wand

SPONGE FILTER - Many suggest placing a sponge filter in your main tank and then transferring the sponge into the q-tank when the q-tank is needed. This seems really cost effective as I already have an unused airline on my pump. Not sure how much my water turbulence would increase, but my biggest concern with this option is that with my aquascape I really don't have enough open floor space to put a sponge in my main tank.

SPONGE ADDITION TO CURRENT HOB: Another suggestion I see is to add a sponge to my current HOB filter and then add one of the sponges to a HOB for the 10 gallon q-tank. But I'm trying to manage some costs and don't know if another HOB is my best option in that regard. I also spoke to Hagen and the representative I spoke to advised it is risky to stack sponge filters in HOB as back to back sponges have a tendency to clog and then overspill into the room.

ADD ANOTHER HOB TO MAIN TANK: and then transfer it to the q-tank when needed. Doesn't seem cost effective and I already have enough filtration plus I'm concerned with additional waterflow.

Hagen suggested an Elite Mini Filter, it appeared to be something similiar to a very small, adjustable, powerhead with a sponge filter. It is small at only 3 inches x 5 inches, has suction cups and clips to hang from the top brim of the tank (wouldn't interefer with my aquascape), runs directly from wall current (no air pump needed), has an adjustable flow and they only cost $10-$11. The lady from Hagen was allover this as my most viable option. It states it's desogned for up to 3 gallons, but she said for short term q-tanks it would be more than sufficient for a 10 gallon q-tank.

Would this hold enough benefical bacteria to seed a 10 gallon?

Would this filter provide a good option for me?

What works best for your q-tank.

A-130 Elite Mini Filter

Romad 11-17-2011 04:12 PM

Do you have a tank already?

If not, the Aqueon 10 gallon kit can be found for $25 - $35 and includes everything except for gravel and decor. If it's a hospital tank - you'll be wanting a bare bottom tank anyway.

I use this one and when I set it up, I just borrow some of the floss from the filter of the 75 gallon tank and shove it into the filter on the hopsital tank.

And you'll be doing water changes so frequently in a hospital tank, you probably won't be worrying about ammonia.

If using meds, just cut the filter cartridge that comes with the Aqueon filter and dump the charcoal out of it (keeping the mesh in place).

Tracy Bird 11-17-2011 08:11 PM

[quote=Romad;895871]Do you have a tank already?quote]

Yes, I do have the tank...

I guess the bottom line to my question is what's the best way for me to seed a quarantine tank.

Thanks Romad for the reeeply!

Calmwaters 11-17-2011 08:37 PM

I keep an extra sponge filter in one of my tanks thats already set up for when I need to set up my quarentine tank. I can not keep aquarentine tank set up because I can't resist the temptation to fully stock it. LOL ; )

TwilightGuy 11-18-2011 12:10 AM

I wonder, has anyone even measured and monitored ammonia, and nitrite levels in a "part time" tank that uses borrowed bacteria/filter/material from another tank? I'm thinking that if you add new fish to a tank that isn't currently actively processing ammonia, nitrate, nitrate, that initially the ammonia is going to spike way above and beyond the capability of the type of bacteria present in a mature sponge filter or on borrowed filter media from another tank. Most of the bacteria is going to be the nitrite consuming type, which is different bacteria than the ammonia consuming type and therefore a mini-cycling of sorts is going to have to take place.

Is there a flaw in my reasoning somewhere?

What I do for quarantining is simply toss in a clean box filter for particulate filtering and do frequent water changes along with a water treatment product to reduce ammonia, feed lightly to keep pollutants down, and siphon stuff off the bare bottom tank with a hose.

Calmwaters 11-18-2011 08:18 AM

You bring up a valid question it is my understanding that since my filter comes from a fully stocked tank into a lightly stocked tank then the bacteria in the sponge would be more than enough to handle a 2-3 fish in the quarentine tank.

1077 11-18-2011 08:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Calmwaters (Post 896495)
You bring up a valid question it is my understanding that since my filter comes from a fully stocked tank into a lightly stocked tank then the bacteria in the sponge would be more than enough to handle a 2-3 fish in the quarentine tank.

Is the way I do it + water change with PRIME every couple day's to be safe.8-)

AbbeysDad 11-18-2011 10:17 AM

I pondered this for awhile and wondered what if....what if you take the sponge from a conventional bubble up sponge filter and tuck in in the filter on your main tank? It serves a purpose there, then when the QT tank needs firing up, the sponge is removed and reattached to the bubble up tube and installed in the QT tank.

Calmwaters 11-18-2011 10:20 AM

I don't think the sponge would have to be kept in the actual filter it just needs to be in the tank to build up the bacteria.

AbbeysDad 11-18-2011 10:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TwilightGuy (Post 896357)
I wonder, has anyone even measured and monitored ammonia, and nitrite levels in a "part time" tank that uses borrowed bacteria/filter/material from another tank? I'm thinking that if you add new fish to a tank that isn't currently actively processing ammonia, nitrate, nitrate, that initially the ammonia is going to spike way above and beyond the capability of the type of bacteria present in a mature sponge filter or on borrowed filter media from another tank. Most of the bacteria is going to be the nitrite consuming type, which is different bacteria than the ammonia consuming type and therefore a mini-cycling of sorts is going to have to take place.

Is there a flaw in my reasoning somewhere?

Visualize for a moment that we have a 10g established tank (A) with a sponge filter and a few fish (in this example, no susbstrate or decor). Now we setup another 10g tank (B) with fresh water. Now we move the filter and the fish from tank A to tank B. All that's changed is the water. The fish will quickly produce ammonia and the bacteria colony in the filter keeps marching on....right?
The only time we can have an ammonia spike is if/when the bio-load suddenly and dramatically exceeds the processing capability of the bacteria colony. This is most often the case in a new tank uncycled tank with little/no bio-seed, several new fish are added at once, or severe over feeding takes place.


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