Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Normal behavior of an Atlantic Condylactis Anemone (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/coral-reef-creatures/normal-behavior-atlantic-condylactis-anemone-85660/)

dfbiggs 11-09-2011 11:19 PM

Normal behavior of an Atlantic Condylactis Anemone
 
Reefing Madness is probabaly going to answer this...can anyone direct me to a useful site for care of this thing? I get so much contradicting info..I need to hear it from someone with experience. I'm trying to find out if there is something wrong if they turn bubbly then shrink up... I don't know if this is how they move and its normal. Also I am concerned about feeding time. I have successfully fed it every other day and both times its like it throws it back up. Both times I had fed it a small-med sized shrimp but I cut it up in smaller pieces. A couple hours after the first feeding it threw up or lost one of the pieced and I assumed the piece I fed it was too big. The second feeding I made the pieces smaller and it still threw up a piece. now I am assuming it was regurgitated or does their feces come out kind of whole..the shrimp was mushed up a little.

Thanks.

Reefing Madness 11-10-2011 08:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dfbiggs (Post 889457)
Reefing Madness is probabaly going to answer this...can anyone direct me to a useful site for care of this thing? I get so much contradicting info..I need to hear it from someone with experience. I'm trying to find out if there is something wrong if they turn bubbly then shrink up... I don't know if this is how they move and its normal. Also I am concerned about feeding time. I have successfully fed it every other day and both times its like it throws it back up. Both times I had fed it a small-med sized shrimp but I cut it up in smaller pieces. A couple hours after the first feeding it threw up or lost one of the pieced and I assumed the piece I fed it was too big. The second feeding I made the pieces smaller and it still threw up a piece. now I am assuming it was regurgitated or does their feces come out kind of whole..the shrimp was mushed up a little.

Thanks.

You don't need to feed them as much as you think. He will eat when he is hungry also. And from the sound of it, there is nothing wrong with the one that you have. I tried to get you the best summary I could find. Whats your water temp? These like it alittle cooler than what we normally kep our tanks. And this Anemone needs more light than most.
Habit & Habitat:
  • Condylactis Anemone is found on coral reefs, lagoons or in shallow water regions, anchored to a hard surface such as rock, in its natural marine habitat.
  • Condylactis gigantean is sedentary in nature that is, it settles down at one place for quite some time.
  • Condylactis Anemone symbiotically hosts shrimps and diamond blennies. The fish get food and shelter in exchange of the cleaning they do to Condylactis gigantean by eating away all the scrap on and around Anemone. The fish have a coating of mucus that prevents them from getting stung by Condylactis Anemone.
  • For its protection, Condylactis gigantean buries its base into sand or in the crevice of a rock or of any other hard surface.
Morphology:
  • Condylactis Anemone has a single, large polyp.
  • The mouth of Condylactis gigantean is shaped like a slit and is situated in the center of the Anemoneís body. This opening also functions as anus for Condylactis Anemone.
  • The tentacles of Condylactis gigantean are long and are tipped by sting cells, nematocysts. The tips of tentacles may be green, purple or magenta in colored.
Growth enabling environment in your marine aquarium:
  • Temperature of water: Seventy-two to seventy-eight degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Specific gravity of water: 1.023 to 1.025.
  • pH of water: 8.10 to 8.40.
  • Water flow in the aquarium: Condylactis Anemone needs moderate water movement in the reef tank it inhabits.
  • Illumination: Condylactis gigantean requires high intensity lighting in the marine aquarium hosting it.
  • Habit & habitat:
    • Keep Live Rock and crustaceans in your marine aquarium to provide favorable environment for Condylactis Anemone.
    • Condylactis gigantean may move around in your marine aquarium till it gets a suitable place for it to settle down.
    • Keep Condylactis Anemone away from the other invertebrates of your marine aquarium as the Anemone may sting them if obstructed while spreading.
    • Generally Condylactis gigantean grows to a size of around four inches, in a marine aquarium.
  • Feeding & Nutrition:
    • Condylactis Anemone derives its nutrition mainly through photosynthesis which is performed by zooxanthellae, an acellular alga living symbiotically within the Anemone.
    • Condylactis gigantean is Carnivorous in feeding habit and feeds once or twice per week, when open.
    • Condylactis Anemone eats acellualr marine invertebrates, meaty bits of shrimp, brine shrimp, fish and mussels, zooplankton and phytoplankton.
    • Condylactis gigantean spreads its tentacles to catch prey. Any invertebrate coming in the contact of tentacles is stung by the stinging cells and gets paralyzed by the toxins secreted by the stinging cells. The tentacles then put the food in to the mouth of Condylactis Anemone.
    • Add Iodine and trace elements as the dietary supplements for Condylactis gigantean.
Care: Condylactis gigantean requires moderate care.

Caution:
  • Condylactis Anemone has powerful stings. Therefore, keep the Anemone away from the other members in your reef aquarium as the Anemone may sting the other aquarium invertebrates upon any contact with them.
  • Condylactis gigantean can harm even you through its sting leading to some allergic reactions of skin. Therefore, wear plastic gloves while handling it.
  • Owing to its considerable capacity to harm the other tank members through its sting and its habit of moving around, itís better not to opt for Condylactis Anemone at all.
  • If still, however, you decide to keep Condylactis gigantean in your marine aquarium then do not make the mistake of keeping its natural predator, Red-Leg Hermit Crab.

onefish2fish 11-11-2011 08:43 AM

i would feed less often and a smaller portion. i would also attempt to feed it other things from time to time while feeding my other fish. squirt food at its mouth or try half of a silverside. i would start with once every 1-2 weeks. the clear spit up is from excess food/ its waste.

i think i have heard of condys getting ahold of peoples fish.. not 100% sure

all anems will need a reef enviroment, so keep that in mind. proper lighting, alk, mag and ca levels, and flow.

dfbiggs 11-14-2011 11:31 PM

Thanks for the info Reef & Onefish...very useful. I should have the right parameters..I may cool down my tank a bit for it...or even to mock nature.


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