Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/)
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-   -   I have a few questions if you don't mind please... (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/aquaripure/i-have-few-questions-if-you-8526/)

jim21 09-28-2007 10:22 PM

I have a few questions if you don't mind please...
 
Hi John! Welcome to the forum!

Looks like you have a great filter there, I have a few questions if you don't mind please...

I see where it would be a no-brainer solution for cycling a new tank, but once the nitrates are removed does the filter need to be adjusted for less flow/activity?

Along those same lines - if I added this filter to an established tank (with no nitrate problem) would I need to reduce the water changes to give the filter more nitrate to work on? In this case the filter would be used to prevent a nitrate problem as opposed to fixing one.

Finally, if I had a sudden spike in nitrate in a tank and added the filter to reduce it, could it be run 'more aggressively' than is suggested to resolve the spike?

Thanks in advance for your time and information!
-jim

Aquaripure 09-29-2007 10:58 AM

Excellent questions!

Normally you can just leave it at the recommended flow rate and follow the standard instructions indefinitely. With the Aquaripure the standard instructions are to set the flow rate to a low flow and inject nutrient in the form of vodka or sugar water once a week. I have many customers report that after a while they never inject nutrient or adjust it and it keeps nitrates at zero. Every tank is different though but it will never hurt to keep following the standard directions.

"Along those same lines - if I added this filter to an established tank (with no nitrate problem) would I need to reduce the water changes to give the filter more nitrate to work on? In this case the filter would be used to prevent a nitrate problem as opposed to fixing one."

Well, it is very rare that an established tank without a denitrator will have zero nitrates. It will occur only perhaps in a very lightly stocked reef tank. It is best to think of the Aquaripure as a comprehensive biological filter. It will COMPLETELY break down all organic matter into its fundamental gasses as opposed to nitrates however. It doesn't so much need nitrates to function as some organic matter that hasn't been broken down yet in the water column. In a lightly stocked reef tank with other biological filtration and a skimmer this can be a problem. The solution is to reduce or remove the other filtration. The Aquaripure will replace the other biological filtration. This is only an issue with lightly stocked reef tanks with a lot of other filtration. Normally, an aquarist doesn't even need to worry about it.

"Finally, if I had a sudden spike in nitrate in a tank and added the filter to reduce it, could it be run 'more aggressively' than is suggested to resolve the spike?"

Yes, the Aquaripure is overbuilt specifically to respond to these “spikes” and also to deal with demanding situations. Normally any increase in nitrates will automatically be compensated for by the Aquaripure but if for some reason it is not reducing nitrates fast enough then nutrients can be injected up to every four days. This will increase the bacterial action within the filter removing more nitrates.

jim21 09-30-2007 11:55 PM

Thank you very much John! That's exactly the information I was looking for.

-jim

Aquaripure 10-05-2007 08:00 AM

No problem, let me know if there is anything else.


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