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chain 10-18-2011 11:09 PM

Thoughts on a new tank
 
Hello everyone. Newbie here just looking for information thinking about starting a fish tank. I have done a little research and want to let you all know what I am thinking about along with what (no) experience I have. Then I would like to hear thoughts and opinions. =) I am not doing anything just yet, it will probably be a couple months before I start anything, I am just trying to get a head start with research.

The only fish I ever had was a goldfish in a bowl when I was a little kid. I am 31 now.

I would like a fish tank and while I have no experience I would really prefer to go with salt water over fresh. For one saltwater looks so much better and two I would rather not spend money on fresh when salt is what I really want. In the end though if everyone seems to think I need to start with fresh and work my way up then I will do that.

I am thinking I will go with a 75G tank to start out. I know it's a litte big for a first tank but everything I have found seems a larger tank is easier to keep stable and take care of than a small tank. I have a good job and can afford to make a decent tank from the start I think. I am thinking I will go FOWLR, not sure if I would want to go reef in the future but regardless that woud be quite a ways off.

So what thoughts do you guys have about what I am thinking I'd like to do? Is it to much for a first tank?

jennesque 10-18-2011 11:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chain (Post 866973)
Hello everyone. Newbie here just looking for information thinking about starting a fish tank. I have done a little research and want to let you all know what I am thinking about along with what (no) experience I have. Then I would like to hear thoughts and opinions. =) I am not doing anything just yet, it will probably be a couple months before I start anything, I am just trying to get a head start with research.

The only fish I ever had was a goldfish in a bowl when I was a little kid. I am 31 now.

I would like a fish tank and while I have no experience I would really prefer to go with salt water over fresh. For one saltwater looks so much better and two I would rather not spend money on fresh when salt is what I really want. In the end though if everyone seems to think I need to start with fresh and work my way up then I will do that.

I am thinking I will go with a 75G tank to start out. I know it's a litte big for a first tank but everything I have found seems a larger tank is easier to keep stable and take care of than a small tank. I have a good job and can afford to make a decent tank from the start I think. I am thinking I will go FOWLR, not sure if I would want to go reef in the future but regardless that woud be quite a ways off.

So what thoughts do you guys have about what I am thinking I'd like to do? Is it to much for a first tank?


It'll take a large investment on your part, but if you're sure that's what you want to do - you're right in saying that it's easier to maintain a stable environment in a larger tank. They have cheaper ~$6 fish that you could start out with to make sure your tank is cycled and well before adding any expensive fish. If you're ok with the upfront investment - I say go for it!

chain 10-18-2011 11:28 PM

I am thinking initial investment between tank, stand, lighting, live rock and sand, water, etc etc will be close to $2000. Sound about right?

Reefing Madness 10-19-2011 12:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chain (Post 866997)
I am thinking initial investment between tank, stand, lighting, live rock and sand, water, etc etc will be close to $2000. Sound about right?

For a new tank? Or a craiglist tank?
75g with flourescent lighting from Petsmart $200
Live Rock 15lbs and Macro Rock 50lbs $210
2 600gph powe heads $32
2 New 800GPH Wave Maker Aquarium Water Pump Powerhead 3000L/H Circulation Reef | eBay
160 SWC Skimmer or Reef Octopus $160
BUBBLE-MAGUS NAC6A NEEDLE WHEEL PROTEIN SKIMMER (WHITE COLOR) | eBay
75g Stand $170
Live Sand 3 40lb bags @ $50 each
Thats the bulk of it. Heater is cheap. Saltwater test kit $42
Refractometer $60
Good to go. Alot cheaper than you thought to.

chain 10-19-2011 06:36 AM

I will definitely need help with the extras such as protien skimmer, lighting, heater, etc. The bulk of the money I am thinking about is that I want a nice enclosed stand with a canopy, and I was also thinking it would be best if I just shelled out for live rock from the start, I was figuring 100lbs for a 75g tank. Would it be fine to start out with half live rock and half not live, and hope it seeds ok?

Also, being a newb will I have problems or does anyone recommend against me starting with a tank like this? Am I getting in over my head?

Pasfur 10-19-2011 06:45 AM

The amount of live rock will depend a lot on the overall look you want and numbers of fish. I prefer a much larger structure of live rock, closer to 100 or 125 pounds. But in terms of seeding the tank and having the water quality you want, 65 pounds would do the trick.

I do not believe anyone needs freshwater experience to do a saltwater tank. The two have nothing in common.

jennesque 10-19-2011 07:01 AM

I agree that it wouldn't be necessary to start with freshwater. It can just be much cheaper than saltwater so if you're unsure !bout whether you are 100% interested and committed to the work of fish keeping, in light of investing less money I'd recommend starting at freshwater. This is why I started at fw, solely because I don't have the money to spend on a sw tank that may fail because of fault of my own. The only thing I could probably afford would be a bank tank, but those are even harder to maintain! Like I said, of your ok with laying down the cash at the risk that you may lose interest and never get a full return on what you invested, then by all means, go for it! :) you're at least doing plenty of planning and research so I'm sure you'll know exactly what you're getting in to and you'll love it. :)

SaltwaterTaylor14 10-19-2011 10:23 AM

I say go for it! The main thing is do your research and know exactly what your going into and what you need to do. If you have any questions please ask. I look forward to seeing some pictures on the development of your SW tank

Reefing Madness 10-19-2011 10:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chain (Post 867305)
I will definitely need help with the extras such as protien skimmer, lighting, heater, etc. The bulk of the money I am thinking about is that I want a nice enclosed stand with a canopy, and I was also thinking it would be best if I just shelled out for live rock from the start, I was figuring 100lbs for a 75g tank. Would it be fine to start out with half live rock and half not live, and hope it seeds ok?

Also, being a newb will I have problems or does anyone recommend against me starting with a tank like this? Am I getting in over my head?

75g is a good start tank, not to big not to small. You can start with half live rock and half dead rock, no worries there, it will all come out good.

chain 10-19-2011 06:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jennesque (Post 867313)
I agree that it wouldn't be necessary to start with freshwater. It can just be much cheaper than saltwater so if you're unsure !bout whether you are 100% interested and committed to the work of fish keeping, in light of investing less money I'd recommend starting at freshwater. This is why I started at fw, solely because I don't have the money to spend on a sw tank that may fail because of fault of my own. The only thing I could probably afford would be a bank tank, but those are even harder to maintain! Like I said, of your ok with laying down the cash at the risk that you may lose interest and never get a full return on what you invested, then by all means, go for it! :) you're at least doing plenty of planning and research so I'm sure you'll know exactly what you're getting in to and you'll love it. :)


What is a bank tank?


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