Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Tetras for a Rio Ucayali-ish tank? (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/characins/tetras-rio-ucayali-ish-tank-82455/)

MinaMinaMina 10-01-2011 12:22 AM

Tetras for a Rio Ucayali-ish tank?
 
Hi! I hope this is the correct place to post this thread. Please and thank you for all of your help!

I've consider many possible S.A. layouts for a 55g I'm building. Right now I'm looking at a Rio Ucayali -ish tank. I know I'll have about 4 Angels, and about 5 Corydoras trilineatus. But I'm looking to add a group (7 or so) of tetra-y type fish, and I can't seem to find much information on the species of that area.

Ideally, I'd like something brightly colored, but naturally so. Any oddball characteristics are a bonus, too. A two inch (or so) size would be perfect. I'd certainly be somewhat flexible in all of that, considering that now my options appear to be ZILCH. :roll:

If anyone has any knowledge to share about the Ucayali, I'm ready to soak it up! THANK YOU!

Edit- Oops! Forgot to add that a species that I'm likely to find at a LFS (i.e. locally) would be super awesome. Got my eye on da cheddah, saving up that money for the Angelfish shipment, you know!

Jbrofish8 10-01-2011 07:25 AM

Looks like Neon Tetra would work. <-- Click the shaded purple name :)

..except not with angels. :(

MinaMinaMina 10-01-2011 10:58 AM

Thanks, Jbrofish8! I had heard that neons are a natural food for Angels in the wild, and def in the aquarium. Considering that I'm doing this tank specifically for Angels, I think its a no go. But thanks for the input!

I found that searching "Peruvian Amazon" instead of "Ucayali" is getting me more results, but still nothing that would work in my set up. So, please, if anyone has any ideas, please speak up! I'm all ears!

Byron 10-01-2011 05:13 PM

The Rio Ucayali basin lies entirely within Peru. It is now generally accepted by geographers that the headwaters of the Rio Ucalayi are the true source of the great Amazon itself, the world's largest river in terms of its water volume and probably length too. The R. Ucayali and Rio Maranon converge to form the Rio Amazonas upstream of Iquitos, Peru. Although the R. Ucayali itself is fairly long--at 1675 miles/2700km it is the fifth largest tributary of the Amazon--the basin at 130,300 square miles is only 4.9% of the Amazon basin. Most of the Ucayali basin is covered by floodable forest. I mention this because such habitat is prime for forest fish.

You might find this linked site useful; it is a series of incredible photos from an aquarist's fish collecting trip up the Rio Tapiche, a southern tributary of the R. Ucayali. Some of these fish may live in the R. Ucayali itself, or may not. Fish in Amazonia are often endemic to a single stream or river.
http://apisto.sites.no/page.aspx?PageId=68
Still, the photos will give you a superb idea of what a "natural" Ucayali habitat is like.

Tracking down specific species to a river is not always easy. The best resource for this is the Checklist of the Freshwater Fishes of South and Central America by Roberto Reis, Sven Kullander and Carl Ferraris (2003). I wish I could afford this book; much of it is online here and there, but one cannot search by river so you need to read through the thousands of fish, but the known habitat of each species is given. Some species that I can confirm [some of these are in our profiles] are:

Carnegiella myersi [iffy perhaps with angels, being the smallest of the hatchetfish, but angels don't usually bother with hatchets which makes them good tankmates]

Hyphessobrycon loretoensis [this species occurs in streams in the Loreto state of Peru, which is the largest state through which the Ucayali flows, so it may or may not be in the U itself]

Moenkhausia margitae

Corydoras aeneus "gold stripe"
Corydoras elegans
Corydoras panda

Byron.

MinaMinaMina 10-01-2011 07:41 PM

Thanks, Byron! I had heard of the C. elegans and the C. panda, but I didn't know about the Gold Stripe aeneus. . I had also read that C. trilineatus is from the Ucayali. Corydoras trilineatus &bull; Callichthyidae &bull; Cat-eLog &bull; PlanetCatfish &bull; Forum &bull; PlanetCatfish.com Both the panda and the trilineatus (though mis-labeled as julii) are available locally, so I think I'm going with the trilineatus. Just waiting for the next batch in!

The hatchetfish sounds promising... going to do some research on that one! Thanks!

Most helpful of all, I'm going to be buried in the pictures of the collecting trip and tracking down pieces of Checklist of the Freshwater Fishes of South and Central America. And I can't afford it, either! :shock:
Thank you for the candy!

MinaMinaMina 10-01-2011 09:29 PM

Two things:

1. On the page about the fish collecting trip, there is a picture of a fish that looks like a Pristella but has different anal and pelvic fins. Anyone have any idea what this might be?
http://apisto.sites.no/resizeimage.a...=%20%20Tom%20C

2. Also, strongly considering a hatchet group (7-13), except for a few points-
a. I have gaps in my hood where the clear piece of clear plastic (that you're supposed to cut to allow your various cords and equipment to pass out of the tank) had been cut too much, so that now I have two gaps of about 1.5"x2" and 0.75"x2".
Can replacement plastic pieces be purchased independently of a new hood? I don't really know what they're called, so its kind of difficult to do a search for them! :lol:

b. I have an Emperor 400, so a lot surface disturbance is created on one side of the tank. As much as I would like to get a canister, that's not a reality. So I imagine all the turbulence would muck up the hatchets' feng shui. I already have the wheels set to their lowest rotation speed, so any other suggestions on how to tame the rapids?

Thanks again!

Byron 10-02-2011 12:51 PM

3 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by MinaMinaMina (Post 847645)
Two things:

1. On the page about the fish collecting trip, there is a picture of a fish that looks like a Pristella but has different anal and pelvic fins. Anyone have any idea what this might be?
http://apisto.sites.no/resizeimage.a...=%20%20Tom%20C

2. Also, strongly considering a hatchet group (7-13), except for a few points-
a. I have gaps in my hood where the clear piece of clear plastic (that you're supposed to cut to allow your various cords and equipment to pass out of the tank) had been cut too much, so that now I have two gaps of about 1.5"x2" and 0.75"x2".
Can replacement plastic pieces be purchased independently of a new hood? I don't really know what they're called, so its kind of difficult to do a search for them! :lol:

b. I have an Emperor 400, so a lot surface disturbance is created on one side of the tank. As much as I would like to get a canister, that's not a reality. So I imagine all the turbulence would muck up the hatchets' feng shui. I already have the wheels set to their lowest rotation speed, so any other suggestions on how to tame the rapids?

Thanks again!

On the filter, I don't know this model sufficiently to suggest something, but I would mention that if you can get the surface calm at the opposite end of the tank (by directing the flow, using a chunk of bogwood or rock to re-direct it) the hatchets will be OK. They do appreciate calm surface, all my species definitely show this preference in spite of what some sources will tell you about appreciating a flow or current. They don't.

Gaps of only an inch or two will be sufficient for hatchets to jump out. I've lost several over the years. What I do with the plastic strip at the back is use packaging tape to minimize the openings for filters and heaters. Dry the plastic thoroughly, then apply packaging tape and fold it so it sticks together over the opening and is secured to the upper and lower surface of the plastic strip. Hope that is understandable.:-?

On the fish photo, I would suspect this is a Hyphessobrycon species, likely one from what Gery in his Characoids of the World termed the Hyphessobrycon callistus group [clade]. They are very closely related to Pristella species, often found together, and according to Gery differ only in dentition. H. copelandi, H. heraldschultzi, H. callistus and some of what are now in Weitzman's "Rosy" clade of 30+ species. The "flag" dorsal is distinctive, and most also bear a humeral or shoulder blotch, though it can fade completely when the fish is under stress as it would have been for that photo.

Hyphessobrycon now contains over a hundred species, and many are clearly not closely related to others in the "genus" so it needs a major revision cladistically and with DNA sampling, tools that were not known when Gery wrote his monumental book. Weitzman's Rosy clade of about 30 species are likely monophyletic, meaning they all share a common ancestor. This is clearly not the case with the entire genus which is thus polyphyletic. There's a bit more about this in some of our profiles.

I'm attaching a couple of photos from my collection to illustrate, though not suggesting these are the species, but merely to point out the remarkable similarities. First (smallest photo) is H. copelandi, next is H. sweglesi [the Red Phantom Tetra], last is an undescribed species.


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