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twocents 09-29-2011 05:15 PM

Using a large 'garbage' can to store water for water changes
 
I am thinking of buying a 55 gallon Rubbermaid Brute Garbage can, filling it up, sticking a heater in it and let it age for a week. At the end of the week, just pump the water into the fish tanks for water changes. (Would probably use a good percentage of the water as I have 5 tanks of different sizes.). This way the water would be aged and I wouldn't have to use conditioners on the water.

Any thoughts on this?

As I have mentioned in another post, I fear drowning my cats, so I'm still mulling it over. Given the wide lip on the edge of the brute container, I may overdo the protection and clamp the lid at about 3 different points to prevent any accident.

I have used a smaller can to store water and it eventually gets something of a slime coat on it. This was small enough that if a can did chance to fall in, it could easily get out. Also would like input on this.

Thanks.

zof 09-29-2011 05:51 PM

Problem with most trash cans is they are not meant to hold water so they will distort crazy like and become unstable, so it becomes a bit hard to fill them more then 50% up. Best option would be to use one of those giant 55 gallon plastic containers that they sell for emergency water storage, they are more expensive but will for sure hold the water and they also come with a clamp on lid and also a hole for a hand pump, where you can run your heater into. Just leave the small hand pump hole open to allow for oxygen exchange and just plug your heater in a day before you do the water change.

Should work fine as long as you dont have chloramines in your water.

ChrisK 09-29-2011 07:33 PM

I'm going to say go for it at my job we keep two of them filled one with muriatic acid and the other with chlorine for our pool. They hold up pretty well actually no distortions or anything to the trash cans. That is how most pools are pumped their chlorine and acid. We've had both cans for over 2 years with no problems. I say go ahead and do it just be sure to pre treat the water and maybe a week later test the water before a water change.

onefish2fish 09-29-2011 08:08 PM

pre-rinse them first!

but the brute cans do make good water storage. i currently have two 20 gallon size brutes. their lids do snap on so clamping may not be needed. food grade or water drums as mentioned are other good alternatives, just pre-rinse first.

Strand 09-29-2011 08:41 PM

I see you are putting a heater in it but are you having some sort of agitation?


I used the same set up for hydro (Trash can) but had an airstone and pump in there to keep the water moving. Without it the water got pretty nasty.

Mikaila31 09-29-2011 08:59 PM

I've filtered containers like that and kept fish in them. I've never had issues with them distorting. You can use them, but aging water is really not necessary ...

zof 09-29-2011 10:04 PM

I didn't realize which trash can the brute was, yea they will hold water, we use them all the time at work. Check your local craigslist you can find the plastic water drums all the time and they are pretty cheap ( I see some on mine for $25), just gota make sure they were used for food grade product and nothing toxic.

brokenrules69 09-29-2011 11:21 PM

1 Attachment(s)
they make huge plastic barrels for holding water and other types of stuff they are always giving them away for free on craigslist by my house

1077 09-30-2011 01:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mikaila31 (Post 845456)
I've filtered containers like that and kept fish in them. I've never had issues with them distorting. You can use them, but aging water is really not necessary ...


I think he/she is wanting to age the water to allow chlorine to dissipate and save from treating water for same.
If water only contains chlorine, then 24 hours would prolly allow for this to happen.

KendraMc 09-30-2011 09:03 AM

as mentioned, the only problem i can see would be if your water has chloramines in it. your water supplier will be able to tell you that.


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