Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/)
-   Brackish Water (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/brackish-water/)
-   -   Guppies in brackish? w/ Dragon goby (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/brackish-water/guppies-brackish-w-dragon-goby-78301/)

Littlebittyfish 08-17-2011 09:23 AM

Guppies in brackish? w/ Dragon goby
 
I keep reading conflicting information on the web about this, some sites say it's fine..some say noway.
I have a 55 gallon tank I plan to set up soon as a brackish tank. I have 1 dragon goby already, though he is currently living in a 10 gallon freshwater. I got the 55 gallon mostly for my dragon goby...but I would like to put a few other fish in there as well, if i can... I have a few guppies already, but can they live ok in brackish water if I slowly introduce them to it? If not what other fish can I put in a 55 gallon with 1 dragon goby?

TexasTanker 08-17-2011 07:25 PM

I know a man locally that has a brackish set up with guppies. He introduced them slowly, how slowly I have no idea. He did say there was a level of trial and error involved and a rather high mortality rate until he nailed it. Similarly, I have a friend who has guppies in his salt water tank. He got them with the tank and has been unable to move them. So, possible yes, how, I'm not sure.

martian123 08-25-2011 06:32 PM

im going to say your best best are Mollies. I have mollies in my freshwater tank but they are brackish water fish. they are easy to keep, hardy fish that thrive in both fresh and brackish. mollies actually need aquarium salt in the freshwater tank to maintain their slime coat and overall health. mollies do so well with salt that they use molly fry to feed some saltwater fish.

dont risk your guppie's lives go with the mollies

Beaches 08-25-2011 08:48 PM

I don't mean to take this Thread off topic...but
 
I respectfully have to disagree with martian123 on the subject of Mollies needing salt.

There is a fantastic article (which I will just let speak for itself) on the subject written by Dr. Ted Coletti.

The great molly-salt debate

Littlebittyfish 08-26-2011 12:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TexasTanker (Post 787885)
I know a man locally that has a brackish set up with guppies. He introduced them slowly, how slowly I have no idea. He did say there was a level of trial and error involved and a rather high mortality rate until he nailed it. Similarly, I have a friend who has guppies in his salt water tank. He got them with the tank and has been unable to move them. So, possible yes, how, I'm not sure.

In saltwater? That is interesting...I had no idea they would survive in that high of salinity.:shock:

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beaches (Post 800029)
I respectfully have to disagree with martian123 on the subject of Mollies needing salt.

There is a fantastic article (which I will just let speak for itself) on the subject written by Dr. Ted Coletti.

The great molly-salt debate

Thanks, I will check that link out.:-)

If I decide against mollies and guppies for the 55 gallon, what other type of fish could I put in there with my dragon goby?

diablo13 09-19-2011 07:43 PM

I don't have any suggestions, but to the guppy thing, guppies, if introduced correctly, can survive to about 150% of normal seawater salinity, and can breed in both salt and freshwater,
Posted via Mobile Device

KendraMc 09-20-2011 01:11 PM

mollies and guppies are closely related, and while mollies don't need salt, they can live in it with minimal if any problems. i would pick mollies above guppies for a brackish tank, and unfortunately i don't know what other fish to recommend if you don't decide to go with them. there are some really nice looking mollies out there these days, and they are nice, hardy fish.

Byron 09-20-2011 02:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beaches (Post 800029)
I respectfully have to disagree with martian123 on the subject of Mollies needing salt.

There is a fantastic article (which I will just let speak for itself) on the subject written by Dr. Ted Coletti.

The great molly-salt debate

Thanks for linking this. It is an article I have not previously seen. Anyone who reads my rants on salt knows that I agree with everything in this article, and frequently say many of the same things as Dr. Coletti writes. Now I have yet another resource at my disposal.:-)

To the original question posted, I would not subject guppies to a brackish environment permanently. As it mentions in our profile [click on Guppy] it can "tolerate" high salinity but that does not mean it should be forced to do so.

Byron.

KendraMc 09-20-2011 02:22 PM

Byron, just to make sure i (and anyone else with this question) understand, mollies can be in brackish water with no problem, but they do just as well in fresh water? i want to make sure i have this right.

Byron 09-20-2011 02:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KendraMc (Post 833348)
Byron, just to make sure i (and anyone else with this question) understand, mollies can be in brackish water with no problem, but they do just as well in fresh water? i want to make sure i have this right.

Yes, but conditionally. As Dr. Coletti in that article mentions, and as I wrote in our Common Molly profile, this species (Poecilia sphenops) in its natural habitats occurs in fresh and brackish waters. But it has the ability to swim out of brackish when it wants to, since brackish water is what one finds at the mouth of coastal streams and further upstream the water remains strictly fresh. In an aquarium we have either fresh or brackish, and the fish is forced to accept whatever we provide.

I also mention in the profile that many sources recommend brackish. By "sources" I mean very reliable authorities, which are my reference works for the profiles. If there was compelling scientific evidence for either position, I would use it. So that leaves us with the recommendations of knowledgeable biologists like Dr. Coletti.

The issue really is hard water, as he noted in that article. Mineral salts (calcium and magnesium primarily) are prevalent in the natural habitats of livebearers and this is what they really need for long-term health. Tap water with a GH above 12 and a corresponding pH in the high 7's to 8's is ideal.

Byron.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:21 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2