Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Freshwater clam (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/invertebrates/freshwater-clam-74877/)

Chris07860 07-11-2011 03:11 PM

Freshwater clam
 
Will a freshwater clam get along with an eel? I forget what type of eel it is that I have it's one of those small ones with the long skinny nose it likes to go in the gravel and I know the calms do too.

lorax84 07-11-2011 03:52 PM

I don't see any reason they should not get along. Before you go and get a clam you may want to do a little more research though. Clams are often advertised as cleaners for aquariums when really they are unique animals that should probably have a specialized setups. Most people who buy clams just end up letting them slowly die because they aren't getting enough of the food they need once they clean the initial suspended algae and small organisms from your tank.

Chris07860 07-11-2011 05:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lorax84 (Post 731595)
I don't see any reason they should not get along. Before you go and get a clam you may want to do a little more research though. Clams are often advertised as cleaners for aquariums when really they are unique animals that should probably have a specialized setups. Most people who buy clams just end up letting them slowly die because they aren't getting enough of the food they need once they clean the initial suspended algae and small organisms from your tank.

What would your suggestion be as far as keeping a clam?. I did little research and couldn't find much info as far as feeding and little things like that.

lorax84 07-11-2011 06:05 PM

Clams are bivalves, this basically means they suck in water, sift out the edible lifeforms and expel the water back out. In the wild they feed on mostly suspended algae and phytoplankton in the water, in an aquarium there are just not enough of either to sustain them. If you want to keep clams you will need to feed them at least once or twice a day depending on the size and type of clam.

Phytoplankton can be purchased at almost any LFS. It comes in a bottle with a squirt top. You would probably want to use a turkey baster when feeding to make sure your clam gets as much food as possible. This can get pretty expensive so that is always a concern. You will also need to be very regular with your tank maintenance as there is bound to be some extra food around in the tank and you don't want to kill you other fish.

Keep in mind I have never actually kept clams, I just did a little research about them when I was thinking about keeping them. Most of what I read said it was possible to keep them in a community aquarium, but a species only tank was the easiest way to go.

Chris07860 07-11-2011 06:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lorax84 (Post 731780)
Clams are bivalves, this basically means they suck in water, sift out the edible lifeforms and expel the water back out. In the wild they feed on mostly suspended algae and phytoplankton in the water, in an aquarium there are just not enough of either to sustain them. If you want to keep clams you will need to feed them at least once or twice a day depending on the size and type of clam.

Phytoplankton can be purchased at almost any LFS. It comes in a bottle with a squirt top. You would probably want to use a turkey baster when feeding to make sure your clam gets as much food as possible. This can get pretty expensive so that is always a concern. You will also need to be very regular with your tank maintenance as there is bound to be some extra food around in the tank and you don't want to kill you other fish.

Keep in mind I have never actually kept clams, I just did a little research about them when I was thinking about keeping them. Most of what I read said it was possible to keep them in a community aquarium, but a species only tank was the easiest way to go.

Yeah that defiantly sounds like a lot for me to deal with right away. Maybe eventually I will try it. I'm glad I posted my question on here before having any problems so maybe down the road I will try it. Thanks Lorax you been a big help :-)

lorax84 07-11-2011 06:10 PM

No problem. I came to the same conclusion you did after reading up on them, one day it may be a cool challenge to take on but for now it's way to much work.

Chris07860 07-11-2011 06:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lorax84 (Post 731791)
No problem. I came to the same conclusion you did after reading up on them, one day it may be a cool challenge to take on but for now it's way to much work.

With me going to college and just other things yeah I agree it's too much work to deal with for now. It would be cool to have right now but with that much work and me with school it's just not possible. I'm glad you passed your information to me

cmbtengr1371 11-19-2011 03:04 AM

I have had 35 clams in a 20 gal tank for over 18 months. I feed the tank once a day with a pinch of tropical fish flakes. they share the tank with 6 neon tetras, 1 oto, and a dozen ghost shrimp I had 40 when I got them and a few died in the first month and they seem to be doing fine, they are very active as clams can get sometimes they will crawl across the gravel and dig in somewhere else. they are always skimming the water through their mouths. I have some that are 1/2 bigger than when I got them. you can crush up an algae wafer and mix it with water and pour it directly on them I have done this a few times.


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