Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Getting rid of chlorine (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/getting-rid-chlorine-72661/)

jtreagan 06-13-2011 09:29 AM

Getting rid of chlorine
 
When I change water in my tanks I usually fill some buckets with water, let them sit all day or overnight and then add the water to my tank. That way I can avoid using lots of that chemical chlorine treatment. Problem is that having to wait that long is really inconvenient. Has any research been done on just how long it really takes for the chlorine to dissipate? Thanks!

deman3 06-13-2011 10:20 AM

Research indicates 12-24 hours for normal chlorine. However, a lot of municipalites are using chloramine now which needs to be removed via chemicals because it doesn't dissipate as does chlorine.

AbbeysDad 06-13-2011 09:05 PM

Products like StressCoat and may others remove chlorine, chlorimine and ammonia as well as neutralizing heavy metals. It also has aloe to reduce stress and promote the slime coat.
IMHO, well worth the modest investment as a little goes a long way.

Teishokue 06-13-2011 10:26 PM

Still like Prime, its a stress coat, chloramine and reduces toxicfying ammonia

1077 06-14-2011 05:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Teishokue (Post 700186)
Still like Prime, its a stress coat, chloramine and reduces toxicfying ammonia

+one for Prime. Should be all that anyone needs for conditioner/dechlorinator.
Is also cheaper over the long haul than nearly all other water conditioners. 1 ml treats ten gallons,Takes nearly three times this amount of all other conditioners to treat same volume of water.

SinCrisis 06-14-2011 08:10 AM

personally, both stress coat and prime are good. Prime is more concentrated but stress coat has slime coat regen/replace qualities and helps fin repair so both have their uses.

1077 06-14-2011 08:32 AM

If fishes are not being handled,injured by capture,or receiving wounds from other fish or tank decor,there is no need for slime coat enhancers which is often in the form of aloe.
Aloe does little more in my view than clog filter material prematurely.I am doubtful that it can adhere to much of anything in water and if it coats the fishes skin,,then what keeps it from coating fishes gills,nostrils making respiration more difficult?
Healthy fishes are capable of producing slime coat all by themselves IMHO and filter material will stay cleaner longer without the use of aloe product in the aquarium for certain.

SinCrisis 06-14-2011 08:46 AM

Well for me, stress coat has always been effective. When i see any fish wounds, adding stress coat always seems to speed up the healing process. I always dose it after adding new fish and when i need to transport fish. Its very handy to have. I have never had issues with it clogging up filter media. Also, i believe the aloe is just a goo that coats the fish like jello. It dissolves quickly in water and reinforces the slime coat as the fish swim around.

AbbeysDad 06-14-2011 10:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1077 (Post 700431)
If fishes are not being handled,injured by capture,or receiving wounds from other fish or tank decor,there is no need for slime coat enhancers which is often in the form of aloe.
Aloe does little more in my view than clog filter material prematurely.I am doubtful that it can adhere to much of anything in water and if it coats the fishes skin,,then what keeps it from coating fishes gills,nostrils making respiration more difficult?
Healthy fishes are capable of producing slime coat all by themselves IMHO and filter material will stay cleaner longer without the use of aloe product in the aquarium for certain.

As long as you have a bar of soap, you don't need shampoo.
If you have one meal a day, you don't need three.


The fact that a water conditioner that treats chlorine, chloromines, ammonia and heavy metals also contains a small amount of aloe to promote/enhance fish health is not a reason to discard it. The amount of aloe involved in no way clogs filter material. In a sense, the aloe is just an artificial slime that aged (bio-slime) water would contain on it's own...so by removing chloro's, ammonia and heavy metals, we're artificially aging the water slightly. Kinda makes good sense, doesn't it? Is it absolutely necessary?...well no. No additives are necessary if you have distilled, RO or rainwater or otherwise purified or untreated spring or well water. On the other hand, it doesn't hurt and provides additional assurances.

1077 06-14-2011 10:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SinCrisis (Post 700440)
Well for me, stress coat has always been effective. When i see any fish wounds, adding stress coat always seems to speed up the healing process. I always dose it after adding new fish and when i need to transport fish. Its very handy to have. I have never had issues with it clogging up filter media. Also, i believe the aloe is just a goo that coats the fish like jello. It dissolves quickly in water and reinforces the slime coat as the fish swim around.

If you believe in the ...stuff, then that's all that matters.


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