Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Java fern (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-planted-aquarium/java-fern-71962/)

Blackheart 06-03-2011 02:26 PM

Java fern
 
What is the best way to go about growing Java fern for a beginner?

Byron 06-03-2011 02:46 PM

First, I'm pleased to welcome you to Tropical Fish Keeping forum. Nice to have you with us.

Java Fern has a rhizome from which the leaves and hair roots grow, and the rhizome should never be buried in the substrate. It works best if you attach it to wood or rock; black cotton thread or fishingline can be used, or it can be carefully wedged in a crevice. In a few weeks it will attach itself by its roots to the wood/rock. The hair roots will grow down into the substrate but this is not essential if the plant is high up in the tank on the wood/rock.

Just so you know, we have fish and plant profiles here, second tab from the left in the blue bar across the top of the page. When the fish or plant name (scientific and/or common) is used in a post exactly as in the profile, it will shade and you can click on that to see the profile, example Java Fern.

Byron.

Aqua Jon 06-10-2011 02:10 AM

In addition to Byron's comment. Java Fern is an easy to grow plant. It will grow in shaded areas of the tank and does not need a lot of care or maintenance. If you're looking to see a lot of growth, then placing the plant in direct light / unshaded areas of the tank will stress the plant out causing it to produce plantlets from its leaves. Otherwise keep it elsewhere in the tank and it will slowly grow. It's a very forgiving plant and is one of the best to start with :)

brownmane 06-10-2011 03:50 PM

I'm a beginner as well and I have several different plants in my 20 gal. I have 2 java fern which were the first that I put in (last Octoberish). They are still doing well. I have LED light since my tank came as a kit, which I think could be considered medium-low lighting. You can weight them down with almost anything, but to my understanding, don't bury the roots as they can then rot.

The other plants that I have are cryptocoryne wendtii, java moss, vallisneria, ambulia (this one does not have a profile on TFK), small sword plant.

The ambulia doesn't have a profile on TFK, but it looks like camboba (sp?) but keeps its leaves better and I use it as both a floater and planted one. The cryptocorynes need higher light and I have planted them near the front of my tank.

I just found moss balls and am trying one now.

As well, my fish don't seem to bother any of the plants. I do have snails (originally from plants bought) and there are now enough of them that I can see some of the plants with holes in them.

Just thought that I'd put my two cents in as a beginner to encourage you on your venture.

Byron 06-11-2011 12:39 PM

Quote:

I do have snails (originally from plants bought) and there are now enough of them that I can see some of the plants with holes in them.
Brownmane, What type of snails? This could be something else. I can comment more when I know the snail you have.

brownmane 06-11-2011 07:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 698014)
Brownmane, What type of snails? This could be something else. I can comment more when I know the snail you have.

They are small snails and I don't know what kind, other than I'm pretty sure that they are just the "regular" snails that sometimes hitchhike on plants bought from my lfs. I certainly didn't buy any.

I take them out as I find them and then squish them and feed them back to my fish. Some of the other posts I've read mention that they multiply more if there is excess food. So I just figured that they were multiplying enough that they were now going after my plants. Do you think that I should do something more about them?

Byron 06-11-2011 07:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brownmane (Post 698316)
They are small snails and I don't know what kind, other than I'm pretty sure that they are just the "regular" snails that sometimes hitchhike on plants bought from my lfs. I certainly didn't buy any.

I take them out as I find them and then squish them and feed them back to my fish. Some of the other posts I've read mention that they multiply more if there is excess food. So I just figured that they were multiplying enough that they were now going after my plants. Do you think that I should do something more about them?

Any chance of a photo?

Malaysian livebearing snails are conical in shape, quite distinctive, sometimes called horn of plenty or cornucopia, after the shell shape. These are very useful. The more round-shell snails are pond or bladder snails. Also good. I have all of these. They will not eat plants unless the plant leaf is dying. They are good at cleaning up leaf bits. But I have never in 20 years had these eat any of my plants.

Ramshorn is another small snail, the shell is curved like a rams horn. While some say these do not eat plants, others say they do.

I have hundreds of the livebearing snails, in each tank. I consider them a blessing; they get into places and eat stuff i could never deal with.

Holes in plants can be nutrient-related, depending upon what the holes look like. A photo here might help too.:-)

Byron.

brownmane 06-11-2011 08:07 PM

Thanks for your advice, Byron. I can't attach pictures as I don't own a camera and I am definitely not computer literate. I just recently started learning what "forums" are and it is TFK that I am learning from. lol

I am pretty sure thatthe snails are regular, or pond snails. I fertilize with Flourish Comprehensive. I just went and looked at my tank and it is only the one java fern with the holes. It is the only plant affected of all of mine. I just thought that the snails were eating it, or that the leaves were aging (the fern is one of the first plants I started with). The holes are rounded, not irregular shaped and are throughout the leaves. The edges are brown/black.

Byron 06-12-2011 11:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brownmane (Post 698346)
Thanks for your advice, Byron. I can't attach pictures as I don't own a camera and I am definitely not computer literate. I just recently started learning what "forums" are and it is TFK that I am learning from. lol

I am pretty sure thatthe snails are regular, or pond snails. I fertilize with Flourish Comprehensive. I just went and looked at my tank and it is only the one java fern with the holes. It is the only plant affected of all of mine. I just thought that the snails were eating it, or that the leaves were aging (the fern is one of the first plants I started with). The holes are rounded, not irregular shaped and are throughout the leaves. The edges are brown/black.

That is not from the snails. Java Fern is the very last plant snails or fish will eat.

Is it attached to wood or rock? The rhizome can't be buried in the substrate. It also prefers less light, so a shadier spot such as under floating plants or a larger overhanging plant might be better. I have had this plant do very well and very poorly in different tanks. Check our profile, this is explained there.

Flourish Comp only once a week, no more than the amount on the label. Should be fine.

Byron.

brownmane 06-12-2011 04:29 PM

It might be the lighting since I have it at the front of my tank and the plant was ok all winter. The other java fern is at the back of the tank and has no holes. It has attached itself to a rock. I will think about where I can move it. :-)


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