Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/)
-   Tropical Fish Diseases (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/tropical-fish-diseases/)
-   -   Females Giving Birth Then Sudden Deformity (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/tropical-fish-diseases/females-giving-birth-then-sudden-deformity-71722/)

MsNaFew 05-31-2011 01:30 PM

Females Giving Birth Then Sudden Deformity
 
Ok, I admit it. I'm a noob. Learned from my past mistakes and have a (knock wood) thriving ten gal full of healthy fry. Other in the 20 gal, after the mom's have had a well deserved rest, they are placed back within the female community until ready to be bred.

So. 3 females, same problem, and I'm scratching my head on it, honestly puzzled. 3 females gave birth at the same time in the ten gal, having been acclimated a week prior to ensure no stress, delivered fine and now both appear as though they got smashed in a door frame!

Think bent into almost a U shape. Still, eating and swimming (or trying to) they remain either upside down, resting on the plants or on the bottom though, again, no disease apparent, water parameters religiously monitored and well within the normal to optimal category, so what the heck did I do to them?!

Diet consists of Guppy Veggie Flakes, frz Brine Shrimp, Livebearer Protein Flakes and the occasional freeze dried bloodworm. Fry aren't deformed and neither were they until after delivery. And I didn't smash 'em in the door frame! LOL but....HELP?!

bettababy 06-02-2011 12:38 AM

Unfortunately, this does happen and is usually neurological in nature, caused by giving birth. You didn't do anything to them. Very young females and very old females are more prone to this, and also those that are on the smaller side with large spawns... but its possible in any livebearing fish. The birthing process is difficult for them, much the same way a female human goes through labor and childbirth, only 30+ times in a row. There are many things that can play into it, but the end result is usually neurological damage caused by physical straining or too much pressure on just the right muscles during the birthing process. There is no cure for this, its permanent. The kindest thing you could do for them would be to humanely euthanize them.

Sorry thats probably what you wanted to hear. If you have more questions, please ask.

MsNaFew 06-02-2011 07:56 AM

Oh no! And I even left out the breeding trap, due to fear it was too small and too confined. sigh It makes sense. One female was young, dropped around 20 and the two other females were a tad older ( like 7 months is old, huh?) and both had large drops themselves.

I'm somewhat relieved that I didn't inadvertently do something wrong to cause this but on the same hand, OW! Darn it! Thank you, for responding! :)

eileen 06-02-2011 11:23 AM

Sorry to hear about your females having that problem. I find that information very helpful as I have Blue Tiger endler hybrids and Metallic endler hybrids, Pink/scarlet endler hybrids so that is good to know. Well at least you can look forward in raising the offspring of them. Guppies and Endlers have a short lifespan anyways so that is why they have alot of fry each month. They are not called the million fish for nothing. In nature the colorful males are preyed upon and they get eaten by other animals or bigger fish that is why they have so many babies.

Good luck on raising your livebearer fry.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:11 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2