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kishii2213 05-07-2011 01:00 PM

Algae Growth Problem
 
I do my 25% water changes and rinse everything off every 2 weeks but there is a lot of algae growth on the fake plants and on the gravel. My water temp is always good and water tests come back perfect. Why is there so much growth? Is it from the algae pellets I feed my pleco?

PLease help

leogtr 05-07-2011 01:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kishii2213 (Post 667582)
I do my 25% water changes and rinse everything off every 2 weeks but there is a lot of algae growth on the fake plants and on the gravel. My water temp is always good and water tests come back perfect. Why is there so much growth? Is it from the algae pellets I feed my pleco?

PLease help

hi there!

what kind of light do you have? I never get algae for some reason..

Byron 05-07-2011 03:21 PM

Leogtr, that's because you have live plants and things are balanced, relatively anyway.;-)

Kishii, algae is a plant, and all plants need nutrients in the presence of light. Without live plants in your tank, there is nothing to use the nutrients that are there, so algae appears. The more light you have (in intensity and duration), the more algae.

Nutrients occur from organics--fish waste, uneaten food, decaying plant/animal matter, etc. Perfectly natural. There are bacteria that will appear automatically and these break down the organics--in the filter, in the substrate, even on any surface. The nutrients that result provide food for algae/plants.

Algae in the absence of live plants is actually a good thing, as it is one natural way to reduce excess nutrients which is better for the fish. Regular weekly partial water changes are another. Not feeding more than sufficient and not overstocking fish are other ways to limit nutrients and the resulting high nitrates.

There are many types of algae, some can be quite attractive, and natural looking. Those of us with planted tanks don't like seeing too much algae because when it starts growing on plant leaves it inhibits respiration and nutrient uptake and the plants can fail and die.

Limiting the light works to minimize algae.

Byron.

leogtr 05-07-2011 07:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 667711)
Leogtr, that's because you have live plants and things are balanced, relatively anyway.;-)

Byron.

ohhh...and because I have a quadrillion snails laying eggs too multiply twise as much every week!!! right?? I know their my little cleaning crew but I wish they didnt reproduce like they do it is just too much :|

do you know of a small fish that eats their eggs?? will neons eat the eggs??

dusted 05-07-2011 09:29 PM

I just started the algae battle as well, mine is mostly on the glass and the center decor in my tank. I was leaving my lights on for 12-14 hours, I just dropped it back to 6-8 hours.

Byron 05-08-2011 10:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by leogtr (Post 667930)
ohhh...and because I have a quadrillion snails laying eggs too multiply twise as much every week!!! right?? I know their my little cleaning crew but I wish they didnt reproduce like they do it is just too much :|

do you know of a small fish that eats their eggs?? will neons eat the eggs??

The small snails (Malaysian livebearer, pond and bladder snails) will eat algae, though minimally. But the live plants are the best preventative if it is all balanced.

Nothing I know of will eat snail eggs. If you see them, remove them manually. Pond and bladder snails lay eggs (a little spot of gelatin with the tiny eggs), Malaysian are livebearing as the name says. Some fish will eat snails, but I do not recommend this unless it is a large tank with sufficient space for the fish (most of which are larger) and you really like and want the particular fish species. And you are correct, any so-called snail eradicator will almost certainly be detrimental to the fish and plants. Such chemicals should never be used in a tank with fish.

I never worry about snails, and I have hundreds in each tank. And I do not overfeed, by any stretch of the imagination. They wouldn't be there if they were not finding their food, and that is a great benefit.

Byron.


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