Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/)
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-   -   Fire Eel and Lava Rock (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/fire-eel-lava-rock-69168/)

Nate515 04-28-2011 02:36 PM

Fire Eel and Lava Rock
 
Was wondering if it's okay to keep fire eels with lava rocks? Because I heard that the surfaces of some gravel and rocks are too abrasive for them and might hurt them?

mastacembelus erythrotaenia

Nate515 04-29-2011 01:29 PM

Well since no one answered I ended up looking around and in case anyone in the future is curious:

Fire Eel

Even though I'm questioning it a lot like....what do they do when they encounter an abrasive rock in real life, avoid it? I've seen pictures with them around seemingly sharp rock edges...

But just for the heck of it, I'll take the rocks out.

aunt kymmie 04-29-2011 02:48 PM

If it was me I'd also remove the lava rock too. Lava rock isn't found in their natural environment and being scaleless I would think they could very well scratch themselves! Why risk it? Scratches aren't a big deal but if they become infected they turn into a big deal. Do you have any pics you can post of your eel?? :-)

Nate515 04-29-2011 09:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aunt kymmie (Post 661623)
If it was me I'd also remove the lava rock too. Lava rock isn't found in their natural environment and being scaleless I would think they could very well scratch themselves! Why risk it? Scratches aren't a big deal but if they become infected they turn into a big deal. Do you have any pics you can post of your eel?? :-)

I haven't gotten them yet, I'm setting it up for when I get them. I hope they come in good condition and my tank meets their requirement.

I just spent 6 hours today redoing my whole tank: taking out lava rock and replacing them with driftwood, scrubbing the tank wall, doing half water change, adding aquarium salt, changing canister filter media and adding some carbon to it, bought acrylic from home depot to make the cover for my tank (had a big glass cover that I hated and didn't fit), cleaning stuff...

I'm hungry but when I get them I'll try to post some pictures.

aunt kymmie 04-29-2011 11:55 PM

Sounds like your tank will be a nice setup for them, and a tight fitting acrylic hood is a must. Mine jumped ship once, was on the carpet dried up looking (with cat hair stuck to him :shock:). I picked him up, set him back in the tank and he survived. Tough little bugger. I'm not sure I'd use the salt. Being scaleless fish they are highly sensitive to salt, and from experience I know they do not need it. Nearly all freshwater fish don't do well with it. Something to consider.

Nate515 04-30-2011 04:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aunt kymmie (Post 662008)
. I'm not sure I'd use the salt. Being scaleless fish they are highly sensitive to salt, and from experience I know they do not need it. Nearly all freshwater fish don't do well with it. Something to consider.

Ya I was reading around about aquarium salt, I guess I'll just use it when and if (knock on wood) he gets sick.

I went out to the LFS and they had some eels that they didn't know what type and there were dead fish everywhere....shouldn't it be illegal or go against some kind of code? They keep all these tiny helpless baby turtles in a 2.5 gal critter keeper, bleh.

I got a bit confused on the salt because of the read I posted above but I got it and I'll keep it around just in case. I heard that aquarium salt is a good beginning treatment or to help alleviate the problem if they ever have any kind of infection? Or is salt to be avoided completely no matter what?

aunt kymmie 04-30-2011 09:10 AM

This was taken from another thread, written by my friend Byron. I personally do not use salt, ever. Once I tried to use aquarium salt for treating ick (on scalessless fishes) and the results were NOT good. The only other time I have ever used anything with the word salt in it was when I used Epsom Salt (not really salt at all) to treat a discus for constipation.

Have a read:

"Salt is detrimental to freshwater fish and plants in varying degrees. To understand why, we must understand what salt does in water.
Salt makes the water more dense than the same water without salt. The aquarium contains water. The bodies of fish and plant leaves also contain water [just as we do--we are, what is it, 70-some percent water?]. The water in the aquarium and the water in the fish/plant are separated by a semi-permeable layer which is the cell. Water can pass through this cell. When either body of water is more dense, the other less-dense body of water will pass through the membrane to equalize the water on both sides.

Water is constantly passing through the cells of fish by osmosis in an attempt to equate the water inside the fish (which is more dense) with the water in the aquarium. Put another way, the aquarium water is diluting the fish's body water until they are equal. Freshwater fish regularly excrete this water through respiration and urination. This is the issue behind pH differences as well as salt and other substances. It increases the fish's work--the kidney is used in the case of salt--which also increases the fish's stress in order to maintain their internal stability. Also, the fish tends to produce more mucus especially in the gills; the reason now seems to be due to the irritant property of salt--the fish is trying to get away from it.

I have an interesting measurement for fish. Dr. Stanley Weitzman, who is Emeritus Research Scientist at the Department of Ichthyology of the Smithsonian Institute in Washington and an acknowledged authority on characoid fishes, writes that 100 ppm of salt is the maximum for characins, and there are several species that show considerable stress leading to death at 60 ppm. 100 ppm is equal to .38 of one gram of salt per gallon of water. One level teaspoon holds six grams of salt, so 1 tsp of salt per gallon equates to more than 15 times the tolerable amount. Livebearers have a higher tolerance (mollies sometimes exist in brackish water) so the salt may be safe for them.

Plants: when salt is added to the aquarium water, the water inside the plant cells is less dense so it escapes through the cells. The result is that the plant literally dries out, and will wilt. I've so far been unable to find a measurement of how much salt will be detrimental to plants; all authorities I have found do note that some species are more sensitive than others, and all recommend no salt in planted aquaria."


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