Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Mid-sized Peaceful Fish (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/mid-sized-peaceful-fish-67378/)

Ferret 04-07-2011 07:15 PM

Mid-sized Peaceful Fish
 
I got really lucky and picked up about 13 celestial pearl danios for my 29 gallon tank. Due to their relatively endangered status I wanted to pretty much give the tank to them and eventually try to breed them. Currently 13 of of the CPDs, along with 2 oto cats (2 more on the way), and cherry shrimp reside in the tank. It's my understanding that, aside from the CPDs themselves, nothing in the tank currently will have a negative impact on their breeding. I'd like to keep it that way, but I was wondering if there are any larger (larger in terms of a 29 gallon tank) fish that I could safely add to the tank. I'd just like something that would do well by itself or maybe in a group of 2-3, and isn't skittish.

I want to be sure that it is something that won't harass the CPDs, or their young (eggs/fry). I plan on separating the eggs as I can, but I don't want something in that tank that will completely obliterate them before I have a chance. The tank is already pretty heavily planted, and will eventually be almost completely covered in plants (anubias growing over rocks, HC carpeting substrate). Would love some input from the community, thanks.

Guppie luver 04-07-2011 07:47 PM

Um I don't know sorry someone will come soon to help you. Promis I will do some reserch then maby I can help you!

Guppie luver 04-07-2011 08:15 PM

Is bryon here? I think he can help.

Mikaila31 04-07-2011 09:10 PM

For breeding purposes its best to keep them species only. Cherry shrimp are not 100% egg friendly. CPD are endangered, probably the most recent species that ended up in its current state directly because of this hobby. Wild populations are small, but also their range is unknown. Their is however a difference between wild and captive populations. A number of the fish that have a strong presence in this hobby are endangered in their wild populations. Take the tinfoil barb for example. Similar to how there are more privately owned captive tigers in the US then in the wild.

LasColinasCichlids 04-09-2011 05:56 AM

Being that they ( Celestial Pearl Danio ) are a skittish fish, and very small, I think any other fish would be too threatening for them as far as that goes. However, another fish I think that would work very nicely with them and also is very small and probably wouldnt scare them or bother eggs is the corydoras habrosus ( Salt and Pepper Cory ). Habrosus are similar in size (max out at 1.4 inch, but are usually closer to or just under an inch). The habrosus also have the same water requirements, so it could work out very nicely. Or you could also see about picking up some more CPDs...as 20 is a nice number and is recommended per their profile here, not to mention you have plenty of room in a 29 gal for that many. :)

Just a thought. Keep us posted!

Ferret 04-09-2011 11:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LasColinasCichlids (Post 643247)
Being that they ( Celestial Pearl Danio ) are a skittish fish, and very small, I think any other fish would be too threatening for them as far as that goes. However, another fish I think that would work very nicely with them and also is very small and probably wouldnt scare them or bother eggs is the corydoras habrosus ( Salt and Pepper Cory ). Habrosus are similar in size (max out at 1.4 inch, but are usually closer to or just under an inch). The habrosus also have the same water requirements, so it could work out very nicely. Or you could also see about picking up some more CPDs...as 20 is a nice number and is recommended per their profile here, not to mention you have plenty of room in a 29 gal for that many. :)

Just a thought. Keep us posted!

Great advice, I'll definitely keep my eye out for more, but the LFS that I got them from doesn't get them regularly. I had some cory cats in the tank, but moved them to another as I read they don't like tanks with carpeting plants.

LasColinasCichlids 04-09-2011 12:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ferret (Post 643347)
Great advice, I'll definitely keep my eye out for more, but the LFS that I got them from doesn't get them regularly. I had some cory cats in the tank, but moved them to another as I read they don't like tanks with carpeting plants.

Most cories dont particularly care for them, no. However, the habrosus is one of the dwarf species, and are a little different. Pygmy corydoras/ corydors pygmy would be another option if you are concerned with that, as they tend to school just about the bottom and some in the middle. I have found that they are much harder to find than habrosus though, as they were what I was originally after. I think habrosus would do fine with carpeting plants, as mine spend much of their time surfing leaves and decor verses substrate like my albino cories.

Byron 04-09-2011 01:01 PM

As mentioned in our profile, this species is an egg scatterer, and the parents show no parental care. A thickly planted aquarium with fine-leaved plants such as Cabomba and similar types would probably allow for the eggs to survive predation by the parents. However, all corys are very good at finding eggs, and will eat any they find. They spend their waking hours (and during darkness too) browsing every plant leaf for food. In my tanks with corys very few eggs survive to hatch, but in cory-less tanks the survival is noticeably higher even without intervention from me.

Byron.

LasColinasCichlids 04-09-2011 01:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 643402)
As mentioned in our profile, this species is an egg scatterer, and the parents show no parental care. A thickly planted aquarium with fine-leaved plants such as Cabomba and similar types would probably allow for the eggs to survive predation by the parents. However, all corys are very good at finding eggs, and will eat any they find. They spend their waking hours (and during darkness too) browsing every plant leaf for food. In my tanks with corys very few eggs survive to hatch, but in cory-less tanks the survival is noticeably higher even without intervention from me.

Byron.

Ah ha! This is why I said "probably wouldnt bother the eggs"...lol... I dont deal with reproduction with my fish (I actually strive not to), so with the breeding of them I guess my cory suggestion goes out the window.

:cry: Sorry I couldnt have been of more help. I still stick with my suggestion of just getting more CPDs though. :-D

Good to know if I ever decided to breed. Although I would LOVE if any of my current two cory species gave me some fry! ;-)

Byron 04-09-2011 01:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LasColinasCichlids (Post 643412)
Ah ha! This is why I said "probably wouldnt bother the eggs"...lol... I dont deal with reproduction with my fish (I actually strive not to), so with the breeding of them I guess my cory suggestion goes out the window.

:cry: Sorry I couldnt have been of more help. I still stick with my suggestion of just getting more CPDs though. :-D

Good to know if I ever decided to breed. Although I would LOVE if any of my current two cory species gave me some fry! ;-)

Yes, corys and indeed most catfish (being nocturnal) are exceptional at getting eggs or fry. I have dwarf cichlids in 2 tanks that regularly spawn, but rarely do the eggs survive to hatch, and if they do the fry get eaten the next day. I have seen a trio of corys come upon a Ram shepherding her fry around mid-water in front of a standing chunk of wood, and the feeding frenzy was remarkable. She tried, but within a few seconds, saw it was hopeless and gave up.


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