Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Dissolving Cryptocorynes?? why are they dying? (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-planted-aquarium/dissolving-cryptocorynes-why-they-dying-67240/)

leogtr 04-05-2011 11:31 PM

Dissolving Cryptocorynes?? why are they dying?
 
hi everyone I have a planted aquarium and I add Seachem's comprehensive, potassium, and excel every saturday after a big water change and I have done so for about 2 months. Today I noticed that the cryptocoryne's leaves are dissolving and that was very strange because all the other plants could not be doing any better. One thing is that I see the Acute Bladder Snails all over them but they have been doing that from the very beginning and now there are alot less snails..

The other plants are a Anubia Nana Petite, some Amazon Swords, a Large-Leaf Amazon Sword, some Java Ferns, a Red flame sword, some Rotala Rotundifolias, some kind of alternantheras and some others that I dont know and they all grow really fast and colorful. I have a LIFE-GLO 20 watt T8 6700K Daylight fluorescent bulb and I leave it on for 11 hours a day. Absolutely no signs of algae anywhere for some weird reason. I also overfeed the tank and I do 50% water changes everyday and have done so since my aquarium cycled.(Im paranoid to boot) my pH is 6.8 and the Ammonia is zero the nitrites zero and the nitrates 5 to 10 ppm. I dont know the softness of the water but Im pretty sure its soft. the temperature is 75 degrees to 77 degrees.

what do you think is going on? I thought that cryptocorynes are hardy healthy medium to low light plants..

thank you for your help:)



SomeDudeAtHome 04-06-2011 09:34 AM

How long have they been in your tank? They could be going through something called crypt-melt which is when they're recently moved or replanted the leaves tend to die but can come back if the roots are left alone.

leogtr 04-06-2011 10:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SomeDudeAtHome (Post 640656)
How long have they been in your tank? They could be going through something called crypt-melt which is when they're recently moved or replanted the leaves tend to die but can come back if the roots are left alone.

oh okay thank you very much!! see I had one in the middle of the aquarium and it was big so I took it apart and planted all the little bud thingys all over. Those little bugs are looking okay for now but there is one that I didnt touch at all at shes on the left-hand side and im telling you it just melted and another on the side of that one is melting and its just too strange to me :l

redchigh 04-06-2011 10:32 AM

When there are drastic changes in water chemistry, many crypts will melt.
It can also happen from being moved or disturbed, or from looking at them with a mean look in your eye.

Byron 04-06-2011 11:50 AM

Redchigh is quite correct, any environmental change can cause some crypts to melt within a day or two. A few species seem immune to this. In our plant profiles this is referenced.

"Any environmental change" means a change that is significant to the plant (and this may not be much) in water parameters (temperature, pH, hardness), light (intensity, duration), nutrients (fertilizers--more on this in a moment), being moved within the tank or to another tank (roots disturbed). Aquarists have had something like replacing the fluorescent tube cause a melt because the sudden brighter light is too much for the plant. I have had a complete meltdown of all crypts in a large tank after a water change that caused a change in pH (due to a change in the tap water unknown to me).

Now to the fertilizers being added on Saturdays.

Excel added once a week is completely useless, and more harm than good because it temporarily upsets the balance of nutrients. I'm not saying this was the cause of the crypt melt, but it is something that crypts and all plants do not appreciate. I would stop using Excel. If it is going to be used, it must be daily, just like CO2 diffusion. The level of carbon via either method must be maintained the same every day, in balance with the light and other nutrients of course, or it is not going to be beneficial.

You can add other nutrients periodically because minerals remain in the water until they are used by the plants or if they bind to excess oxygen. But here you must be careful not to overdose any one nutrient, as some can cause plants to shut down the assimilation of other nutrients. For example, an excess of potassium will cause plants to stop assimilating iron, causing an iron deficiency even if iron is present in the water. It's all about the balance between light and 17 nutrients.

The excess potassium and carbon might have led to the crypt melt, and it can take time. Plants like crypts that are relatively speaking slow growing can take up some nutrients and store them, but there is a limit to this storage, and once reached, the excess nutrient then becomes detrimental to the plant.

I would stop the Excel and Potassium. Stick to the Flourish Comprehensive. It is balanced, and intended for natural low-tech systems such as you have. Your light is not sufficient to go beyond this anyway.

Byron.

leogtr 04-06-2011 04:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by redchigh (Post 640690)
When there are drastic changes in water chemistry, many crypts will melt.
It can also happen from being moved or disturbed, or from looking at them with a mean look in your eye.

oh okay okay..but I always smile at they went I observe them!!


Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 640738)
Redchigh is quite correct, any environmental change can cause some crypts to melt within a day or two. A few species seem immune to this. In our plant profiles this is referenced.

"Any environmental change" means a change that is significant to the plant (and this may not be much) in water parameters (temperature, pH, hardness), light (intensity, duration), nutrients (fertilizers--more on this in a moment), being moved within the tank or to another tank (roots disturbed). Aquarists have had something like replacing the fluorescent tube cause a melt because the sudden brighter light is too much for the plant. I have had a complete meltdown of all crypts in a large tank after a water change that caused a change in pH (due to a change in the tap water unknown to me).

Now to the fertilizers being added on Saturdays.

Excel added once a week is completely useless, and more harm than good because it temporarily upsets the balance of nutrients. I'm not saying this was the cause of the crypt melt, but it is something that crypts and all plants do not appreciate. I would stop using Excel. If it is going to be used, it must be daily, just like CO2 diffusion. The level of carbon via either method must be maintained the same every day, in balance with the light and other nutrients of course, or it is not going to be beneficial.

You can add other nutrients periodically because minerals remain in the water until they are used by the plants or if they bind to excess oxygen. But here you must be careful not to overdose any one nutrient, as some can cause plants to shut down the assimilation of other nutrients. For example, an excess of potassium will cause plants to stop assimilating iron, causing an iron deficiency even if iron is present in the water. It's all about the balance between light and 17 nutrients.

The excess potassium and carbon might have led to the crypt melt, and it can take time. Plants like crypts that are relatively speaking slow growing can take up some nutrients and store them, but there is a limit to this storage, and once reached, the excess nutrient then becomes detrimental to the plant.

I would stop the Excel and Potassium. Stick to the Flourish Comprehensive. It is balanced, and intended for natural low-tech systems such as you have. Your light is not sufficient to go beyond this anyway.

Byron.

oh okay thank you very very much Mr. Byron! you know I added the whole cap of comprehensive last time I think that messed me up too because I usually add half:|

I will not use the potassium nor the excel anymore.

I hope they make it I really like those little plants..

and again thank you very much for always being so helpful and informative I very much appreciate it Mr. Byron:)

Byron 04-06-2011 05:13 PM

Almost always the roots remain alive when crypts melt. New leaves will appear, sometimes in just a few days, sometimes much longer. Main thing is not to disturb the roots. Vacuum the mush away.

And be careful with fertilizers; Flourish is "comprehensive" so it is balanced and concentrated. The fact that as little as 1/2 a teaspoon can provide sufficient nutrients in 30 gallons of water for a week tells us how concentrated it is. Don't exceed the dose recommendation on the label.
And even though I am triple your age, you can use "Byron" on its own. We're all friends here.:greenyay:
Byron.

redchigh 04-06-2011 05:15 PM

Besides, I'm fairly sure that's his first name. Wouldn't it be Mr. Hosking?;-)

leogtr 04-06-2011 05:54 PM

Mr. Hosking!!!:-D

lol okay..

Byron is my homeboy!:thumbsup::welldone:and so is Mr.Redchigh!!:mrgreen:

Romad 04-07-2011 04:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by redchigh (Post 640690)
When there are drastic changes in water chemistry, many crypts will melt.
It can also happen from being moved or disturbed, or from looking at them with a mean look in your eye.

Ha ha ha ha. Thanks for the early mornng chuckle. :-)


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