Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   what effects ph? (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/what-effects-ph-66444/)

Boredomb 03-28-2011 01:34 PM

what effects ph?
 
I have a some question about the Level of ph in my tank right now. It hasn't been cycled yet waiting on my plants to arrive on wednesday after that I am going to start trying to cycle the tank.
As of right now the ph lvl in the tank is 7.8 . My tap water is 7.2. So my question is what makes the ph go up? All i have in the tank is ecocomplete substrate and some diftwood? if one of those to make it go up what can I use to make it go down? Or after it cycle will it come down some then? Sorry I still learning some of these process and many of them confuse me. LoL

Byron 03-28-2011 01:59 PM

Eco-complete will temporarily raise the pH slightly. I didn't know it would raise it from 7.2 to 7.8, but they do mention that it will raise it initially.

I would do nothing. I assume there are no fish in the tank yet; if there are, adding any chemical substance to alter the pH can be very detrimental. The pH is what it is due to any number of factors, and many of these have buffering capability preventing pH changes. The pH adjustment stuff lowers the pH, then within 24 hours the buffering agents raise it back. The resulting pH fluctuations can be very stressful on fish, some more than others, and lead to permanent damage and even death.

To the other question, will it come down; yes, probably. In any aquarium, the natural biological processes produce CO2 which produces carbonic acid and as this is an acid it tends to lower the pH; the rate depends upon other factors. Chief among these is the hardness of the source water; the harder the water, the more it acts as a buffer to maintain the pH where it is initially. Calcareous objects (rock, gravel, Eco-complete presumably) will work to increase the mineral content and thus increase the hardness and raise the pH accordingly.

Once the Eco-complete has done its thing, that source will be ended. You are then left with the hardness in the source water. This will determine if the pH falls below 7.2, and if so, how fast it will occur.

It is best to let all this sort out on its own with no interference. As I mentioned at the start, adding pH adjusters does not always work long-term due to these other factors. Fish if present are much better at adapting to pH shifts that are natural and thus slow. Substantial fluctuations especially if done quickly weakens the immune system (via stress) as well as causing internal issues for the fish who must regulate its blood pH according to its environment (the pH of the water).

Byron.

Boredomb 03-28-2011 02:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 631830)
Eco-complete will temporarily raise the pH slightly. I didn't know it would raise it from 7.2 to 7.8, but they do mention that it will raise it initially.

I would do nothing. I assume there are no fish in the tank yet; if there are, adding any chemical substance to alter the pH can be very detrimental. The pH is what it is due to any number of factors, and many of these have buffering capability preventing pH changes. The pH adjustment stuff lowers the pH, then within 24 hours the buffering agents raise it back. The resulting pH fluctuations can be very stressful on fish, some more than others, and lead to permanent damage and even death.

To the other question, will it come down; yes, probably. In any aquarium, the natural biological processes produce CO2 which produces carbonic acid and as this is an acid it tends to lower the pH; the rate depends upon other factors. Chief among these is the hardness of the source water; the harder the water, the more it acts as a buffer to maintain the pH where it is initially. Calcareous objects (rock, gravel, Eco-complete presumably) will work to increase the mineral content and thus increase the hardness and raise the pH accordingly.

Once the Eco-complete has done its thing, that source will be ended. You are then left with the hardness in the source water. This will determine if the pH falls below 7.2, and if so, how fast it will occur.

It is best to let all this sort out on its own with no interference. As I mentioned at the start, adding pH adjusters does not always work long-term due to these other factors. Fish if present are much better at adapting to pH shifts that are natural and thus slow. Substantial fluctuations especially if done quickly weakens the immune system (via stress) as well as causing internal issues for the fish who must regulate its blood pH according to its environment (the pH of the water).

Byron.


Okay Thanks Byron and No there are no fish in there right now. As of right now I am not sure when I will be putting in the fish? Not sure if I am going to use a couple to help cycle the tank or use a different method of cycling the tank then put in some fish or not. Once I get it planted will decide then. I don't really like the idea of adding chemicals to the tank unless I have soo I will let it cycle and keep checking the lvls and go from there. Thanks again for the helpful info!!

Byron 03-28-2011 02:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Boredomb (Post 631853)
Okay Thanks Byron and No there are no fish in there right now. As of right now I am not sure when I will be putting in the fish? Not sure if I am going to use a couple to help cycle the tank or use a different method of cycling the tank then put in some fish or not. Once I get it planted will decide then.

If you plant it fairly well, you can add a few fish and it will be fine. Just don't overload the fish:shock:.

Boredomb 03-28-2011 02:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 631861)
If you plant it fairly well, you can add a few fish and it will be fine. Just don't overload the fish:shock:.

well whats fairly planted in you opinion? I am getting 38 plants in on wednesday

Boredomb 03-28-2011 03:01 PM

Btw its a 55 gall
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Byron 03-28-2011 03:10 PM

That will work. Some of the plants are likiely to be faster-growing which helps even more as they quickly assimilate a considerable amount of ammonia/ammonium as their preferred source of nitrogen. And the space of a 55g is better still. A few fish, say a group of tetra or something similar, on the first day with the plants in will do it.

Boredomb 03-28-2011 03:15 PM

Okay thanks a lot!!
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