Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/)
-   Invertebrates (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/invertebrates/)
-   -   Food to boost snails calcium levels? (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/invertebrates/food-boost-snails-calcium-levels-63791/)

HMlairy 02-26-2011 05:36 AM

Food to boost snails calcium levels?
 
Hey,
I recently brought home a golden apple snail and put it in my 20g. I haven't had any invertebrates in this tank perviously so calcium is low. I put in crushed egg shell in a container to keep the snail growing for now but I need a more sustainble way (I've heard about crushed coral but unsure where to get it). I was thinking if varying it's diet would increase it's calcium intake?
Please reply :)

Lupin 02-26-2011 09:00 AM

What are your pH and hardness levels? You need to know these because even if you feed calcium enriched foods, that will not be enough to sustain the shell assuming your water is soft and acidic. pH should not sink below 7.4. Dangerously low pH will cause irreparable damage. Damage on the suture (tail end) is in itself irreparable.

Get your crushed corals or aragonite from petstores. And keep checking the pH and hardness levels to see you have adjusted them high enough to minimize shell damage.


As for food intake, you may try feeding it seaweeds, collards and kale. Those are high in calcium content. Other options are plaster of Paris pucks (combined sinking pellets and Dap brand of plaster), cuttlefish bones, snail jello (with calcium supplements added) and calcium pills.


I've personally used plaster of Paris pucks making dozens of cubes in ice cube trays. The pellets are combined to attract the snails into chomping down the plaster of Paris as a means of calcium source. Each puck lasts 3-4 weeks depending on the number of snails eating them. Keep the pucks in the fridge or they'll grow molds and mildews on them.


Here's a list of fruits and vegetables based on calcium content.


Quote:

List of veggies for inverts
Here is a list of veggies and their calcium concentrations I found at www.applesnail.net there is also a list of the calcium to phosphorous ratio as this is also important for inverts. Phosphorous is known to cloud water, so when feeding veggies high in phosphorous be sure to be every dilligent with the water changes.

This is a list of vegetables and fruits along with the amount of calcium in each 100 gram portion. They are ranked in order from the ones that contain the most calcium to the ones that contain the least. I would caution us all to remember when feeding these foods that the phosphorous can have an ill effect on your water quality and may cause an algae bloom if the levels of phosphorous become too high.

Vegetables Calcium per 100 gram serving:
Dill Weed 208 mg
Turnip Greens 190 mg
Collards 145 mg
Parsley 138 mg
Kale 135 mg
Watercress 120 mg
Beet Greens 119 mg
Chinese Cabbage 105 mg
Mustard Greens 103 mg
Chicory Greens 100 mg
Spinach 99 mg
Okra 81 mg
Leaf Lettuce 68 mg
Cilantro 67 mg
Purslane 65 mg
Endive 52 mg
Swiss Chard 51 mg
Broccoli 48 mg
Cabbage 47 mg
Rutabaga 47 mg
Brussel Sprouts 42 mg
Celery 40 mg
Sweet Potato Leaves 37 mg
Green Beans 37 mg
Romaine Lettuce 36 mg
Parsnips 36 mg
Head Lettuce 32 mg
Alfalfa Sprouts 32 mg
Squash (winter, all varieties) 31 mg
Turnip 30 mg
Carrots 27 mg
Kohlrabi 24 mg
Sweet Potato 22 mg
Cauliflower 22 mg
Asparagus 21 mg
Pumpkin 21 mg
Squash (summer, all varieties) 20 mg
Beets 16 mg
Cucumber (with skin) 14 mg
Red and Green Peppers 9 mg
Tomato 5 mg
White Corn 2 mg


Fruits Calcium per 100 gram Serving:
Seedless Raisins 49 mg
Orange 40 mg
Lime 33 mg
Blackberries 32 mg
Kiwi 26 mg
Lemon (no peel) 26 mg
Papaya 24 mg
Raspberries 22 mg
Sweet Cherries 15 mg
Strawberries 14 mg
Tangerine 14 mg
Apricots 14 mg
Grapefruit, White 12 mg
Grapefruit, Red & Pink 11 mg
Pear 11 mg
Cantaloupe 11 mg
Grapes 11 mg
Mango 10 mg
Watermelon 8 mg
Persimmon, Japanese 8 mg
Pineapple 7 mg
Apple (with skin) 7 mg
Cranberries 7 mg
Banana 6 mg
Honeydew Melon 6 mg
Blueberries 6 mg
Casaba Melon 5 mg
Nectarine 5 mg
Peach 5 mg
Plum 4 mg
Calcium:Phosphorus Ratio -- Vegetables

14.5:1 -- Collards
7.5:1 -- Spinach, Mustard
4.5:1 -- Turnip Greens
4.3:1 -- Lambsquarters
3.2:1 -- Dill Weed
3.0:1 -- Beet Greens
2.8:1 -- Dandelion Greens
2.8:1 -- Chinese Cabbage (pak-choi)
2.7:1 -- Lettuce, LooseLeaf
2.4:1 -- Mustard Greens
2.4:1 -- Parsley
2.4:1 -- Kale
2.1:1 -- Chicory Greens
2.0:1 -- Spinach
2.0:1 -- Watercress
2.0:1 -- Cabbage
1.9:1 -- Endive
1.6:1 -- Celery
1.5:1 -- Purslane
1.4:1 -- Cilantro
1.4:1 -- Lettuce, Butterhead (Boston, Bibb)
1.3:1 -- Okra
1.1:1 -- Swiss Chard
1.1:1 -- Turnip
1.1:1 -- Chard, Swiss
1.0:1 -- Squash (winter, all varieties)
1.0:1 -- Green Beans
0.8:1 -- Lettuce, Romaine
0.8:1 -- Sweet Potato
0.8:1 -- Rutabaga
0.7:1 -- Broccoli
0.7:1 -- Cucumber (with skin)
0.6:1 -- Carrots
0.6:1 -- Squash (summer, all varieties)
0.6:1 -- Carrots, Baby
0.6:1 -- Brussels Sprouts
0.5:1 -- Cauliflower
0.5:1 -- Kohlrabi
0.5:1 -- Pumpkin
0.5:1 -- Alfalfa Sprouts
0.5:1 -- Parsnips
0.5:1 -- Peppers,Green
0.5:1 -- Peppers,Red
0.4:1 -- Sweet Potato Leaves
0.4:1 -- Beets
0.4:1 -- Asparagus
0.2:1 -- Tomato
.02:1 -- Corn, White

Calcium:Phosphorus Ratio -- Fruits

4.8:1 -- Papaya
2.9:1 -- Orange
1.8:1 -- Lime
1.8:1 -- Raspberries
1.6:1 -- Lemon (no peel)
1.5:1 -- Blackberries
1.5:1 -- Grapefruit, White
1.2:1 -- Grapefruit, Pink and Red
1.2:1 -- Tangerine
1.0:1 -- Pineapple
1.0:1 -- Pear
1.0:1 -- Apple (with Skin)
0.9:1 -- Mango
0.9:1 -- Watermelon
0.8:1 -- Cherries, Sweet
0.8:1 -- Grapes
0.8:1 -- Cranberries
0.7:1 -- Casaba Melon
0.7:1 -- Apricots
0.7:1 -- Kiwi
0.7:1 -- Strawberries
0.6:1 -- Cantaloupe
0.6:1 -- Honeydew Melon
0.6:1 -- Blueberries
0.5:1 -- Persimmon, Japanese
0.5:1 -- Raisins, Seedless
0.4:1 -- Peach
0.4:1 -- Plum
0.3:1 -- Nectarine
0.3:1 -- Banana

(You want things that are high on both lists.


HMlairy 02-27-2011 08:05 AM

My pH and hardness are fine for the snail said the person who sold it to me (he tested it),
I sunk lettuce in the tank and anchored it with the ornament but the snail hasn't been near it :/

Lupin 02-27-2011 08:09 AM

It may need more time to get accustomed to it. Is this snail a diffusa or canaliculata? Since you're in UK, you could easily obtain the canas that eat plants voraciously.

HMlairy 02-28-2011 12:14 PM

The description in the shop said this type doesn't eat plants too commonly :)
Still won't eat :/

Cynical Fish Guy 09-20-2013 07:27 PM

Haha, based off the info you have given me, I bet you have Pomacea diffusa I can also bet you didn't blanch your greens and instead put fresh greens into your tank. I did the same once. Take your greens out and nuke them in a cup of water. Keep the water in the microwave until it begins to boil. Once the boiling has started you can take the cup/glass of water out as well as the greens. Allow the greens to cool for about a minute and then re-introduce them to the snail. I bet you the snail starts to chow down. P.diffusa doesn't like fresh greens and prefers "matured greens". Only if starving will this species of snail eat living fresh greens. I know from experience. Hardy lil S.O.B. too.

Have fun with your snail, I kind of enjoy mine quite a bit.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:07 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2