Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/)
-   Beginner Saltwater Aquariums (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-saltwater-aquariums/)
-   -   new to saltwater aquariums- need a bit of help and advice (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-saltwater-aquariums/new-saltwater-aquariums-need-bit-help-52458/)

frothyspoon 09-26-2010 09:38 PM

new to saltwater aquariums- need a bit of help and advice
 
I am going to start off by listing details about my setup-
- 90 gallon tank
-home made sump system
-made with a 20 gallon tank
-1 penguin powerhead, rio 1700 for the return, eshopps overflow, and a marineland protein skimmer. All the plumbing is done with PVC and sealed with marine safe silicone
-2 1400 evolution hydor powerheads
-1 hydor 200w heater
-digital thermometer
-40 pounds of crushed coral with 20 pounds of aragonite sand

I am planning to have 100 pounds of live rock as well once i have water

For the water im using instant ocean salt and im using purified water from a LFS


So after all of this, I just need some feed back to see if I'm off the the right start. Is there anything im missing that is an absolute necessity to have a successful marine aquarium? Is there anything that I need that isn't essential but will make my aquarium healthier and better maintained?

I am also curious as to the mistakes made but new marine aquarium keepers. What are common mistakes that can be avoided when starting a new marine aquarium? What are some tips to avoid these mistakes?


The last thing is my stocking list, which i really want to get right. I have a list but I just want to know what fish are suggested for a beginner in a system like I have described above.


Thanks for all your help, it's greatly appreciated

badxgillen 09-27-2010 12:15 AM

salt
 
you might want some more substrate ...i am not sure of your floors area but in a 90 you want a little more ...about a 2" depth...i dont know the temp were you are but i would also recomend another heater so the 200watt doesnt stress on heating the 90 and the sump...as far as mistakes ...lack of research....and going to fast...those are the biggest first time mistakes...see yah around....

denrgb 09-30-2010 12:10 AM

Yeah, what are your floors area dimensions Frothy? Did you want to go shallow or deep with the substrate?

Also, does anyone know of any positives and/or negatives to sand only, coral only, or a layer of coral and then sand, or sand and coral mixed together? Does it matter? Will bad things grow in a layer of crushed coral under a layer of sand?

badxgillen 10-01-2010 12:17 AM

substrate
 
if you do your regular water changes with a gravel vac the layering will eventualy amount to nothing...wich is fine i like alittle differnce in the substrate size....if you go with just a sand bed try to introduce as many sand colonizing or sifting organisms as posibble...a least some nice live sannd from a friend or local fish store...

Pasfur 10-01-2010 07:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by denrgb (Post 482460)
Yeah, what are your floors area dimensions Frothy? Did you want to go shallow or deep with the substrate?

Also, does anyone know of any positives and/or negatives to sand only, coral only, or a layer of coral and then sand, or sand and coral mixed together? Does it matter? Will bad things grow in a layer of crushed coral under a layer of sand?

The issue is not so much with mixed crushed coral and aragonite sand vs aragonite sand only, but more importantly the issue is sand depth. Layers under 4'' are very ineffective at denitrification, providing virtually no ability to reduce nitrate. Layers over 1'' and less than 4'' tend to also trap detritus, resulting in nutrient accumulation and algae outbreaks. Sand beds of a depth between 4'' and 6'' seem to have the best overall results in terms of not causing problems and providing the positive benefit of natural nitrate reduction.

For the record, the grain size that typical "crushed coral" is sold is a bit larger and traps detritus easier, which is harmful. Reef grade aragonite sand is the best option, both for lack of nutrient accumulation in the sand bed and for quality nitrate reduction.

denrgb 10-02-2010 03:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pasfur (Post 483748)
The issue is not so much with mixed crushed coral and aragonite sand vs aragonite sand only, but more importantly the issue is sand depth. Layers under 4'' are very ineffective at denitrification, providing virtually no ability to reduce nitrate. Layers over 1'' and less than 4'' tend to also trap detritus, resulting in nutrient accumulation and algae outbreaks. Sand beds of a depth between 4'' and 6'' seem to have the best overall results in terms of not causing problems and providing the positive benefit of natural nitrate reduction.

For the record, the grain size that typical "crushed coral" is sold is a bit larger and traps detritus easier, which is harmful. Reef grade aragonite sand is the best option, both for lack of nutrient accumulation in the sand bed and for quality nitrate reduction.

Thanks Pas! That was kind of exactly what I thought, and wanted to hear. I actually decided today I'm going to go 4-6 on mine. Oh the excitement is killing me, and I have to wait a week or two for my tank to come in :( Thats ok though, I still have to wait for the shipping time on the rest of it. So much to learn, so little time.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:07 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2