Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Suggest some fish for our office tank (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/suggest-some-fish-our-office-tank-50642/)

eguynth 09-01-2010 07:21 AM

Suggest some fish for our office tank
 
We are moving to a new office, so our boss said we can have a fish tank. Most probably we will have a 30- 40 gallon long tank.
I would like to know some low maintained fish. I can change the water min twice a month with some good filtration system.
Need some colorful for an office environment. Thanks!

kitten_penang 09-01-2010 07:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eguynth (Post 461582)
We are moving to a new office, so our boss said we can have a fish tank. Most probably we will have a 30- 40 gallon long tank.
I would like to know some low maintained fish. I can change the water min twice a month with some good filtration system.
Need some colorful for an office environment. Thanks!


tetras or guppies ^.^

Inga 09-01-2010 09:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kitten_penang (Post 461586)
tetras or guppies ^.^


I agree. If you put some nice real plants in htere, and have a schoal of Neons, it would be beautiful. Think easy plants like Swords.

kitten_penang 09-01-2010 09:10 AM

less work too

JohnnyD44 09-01-2010 09:13 AM

I agree with the above, pending on the office water parameters. A heavily planted tank can thrive perfectly on it's own with minimal water changes, although weekly water changes are preferred.

Let us know what you parameters are, you can take a sample of your tap water to a LFS (local fish store) and have them give you the readings for it, primarily gH and kH

PS - I see you work for a internet marketing firm..?..I'm taking marketing class this fall, should be fun!!!

redchigh 09-01-2010 09:16 AM

I agree, lots of plants can sometimes cut down the frequency of water changes..

Again, I urge you to test your offices tap water. It may be different from home.
Tell us the Ph and I'll comment.

Is Money an issue? Would you me more inclined to cheaper fish, or would more rare fish be nice?

Regardless, I agree that if you have basic water, livebearers would be better... I may suggest swordtails and platies... They're the same price and a bit less 'common' than guppies...
Celestial Pearl danios would be nice in basic water as well...

For acidic water... A large school of tetras would be nice... or maybe a school of 6 cardinals, a school of 6-8 hatchetfish, and a pair of angels? Well planted with varius swords as well...
Be sure to snag an echinodorus augistifolia var. Vesuvius... Very odd-looking.

eguynth 09-01-2010 09:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JohnnyD44 (Post 461628)
I agree with the above, pending on the office water parameters. A heavily planted tank can thrive perfectly on it's own with minimal water changes, although weekly water changes are preferred.

Let us know what you parameters are, you can take a sample of your tap water to a LFS (local fish store) and have them give you the readings for it, primarily gH and kH

PS - I see you work for a internet marketing firm..?..I'm taking marketing class this fall, should be fun!!!

I dont think we have the testing facilities in sri lankan fish stores. all the lfs know **** about fish. :oops:
maybe I'll have to buy a kit from online.
I think i'll get some neons/cardinal and angels perhaps? I wont be able to have a heavily planted tank cause we dont have the substrate in lfs either (****ty country i know).
I had to make my own for my fish tank at home lol (very messy!)

any how thanks for the replies guys I appreciate the help.



*Yeah I work at an online marketing firm, wish you all the best for your studies :)

kitten_penang 09-01-2010 10:21 AM

0.0 gonna be hard but you can get wood and stick plant on the and skip the subtrate

Inga 09-01-2010 10:29 AM

Can you order gravel shiipped in with your water test kit? The plants would be worth the effort, if possible. Not to mention the tank will look so much nicer with a gravel bottom and stay cleaner looking. I don't know what your budget is or if it is possible but something to think about. Good luck to you.

1077 09-01-2010 10:37 AM

Sand might be an option. With plants such as java fern and anubias ,substrate would matter little.


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