Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Home Made CO2 systems (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-planted-aquarium/home-made-co2-systems-49021/)

BradSD 08-09-2010 05:16 PM

Home Made CO2 systems
 
I did a search to find out if any of you have built your own CO2 system for your planted aquarium but turned up nothing. If anyone has pulled this off with success I would love some details. I was thinking of maybe using the throw away tanks from a sporting good store made for paintball guns. Buying a regulator of some sort and a needle valve and maybe using an airstone near my filter intake. Is this crazy or posible? I work in a chemical plant and know the dangers of having CO2 in your home however I dont think a small disposable canister would be to terribly dangerous. I also wonder if you could just batch in some CO2 from time to time, I dont want to purchase a ph controller or any of that really expensive stuff. I love the natural aquarium but I wouldn't mind adding a bit of CO2. Any Thoughts out there on the subject?

Later,
Brad

Byron 08-09-2010 07:58 PM

If you have read the series "A Basic Approach to the Natural Planted Aquarium" stickied at the head of the plant section you will have come across the concept of "balance" which applies to any planted aquarium, high- or low-tech. The principles are the same.

Plants need a continuous balance of light and nutrients. Carbon is one nutrient they need, along with 16 others. Each of these, within a certain range, must be present along with adequate light in order for plants to photosynthesize (which is how they grow, as you may know). If any one of these is missing, the plants cannot photosynthesize fully, and growth may be restricted if not completely stopped; it depends upon the nutrient and other conditions.

Carbon is normally assimilated as CO2 by most aquarium plants; some can use bicarbonates, some can't. All can use CO2 and generally do. CO2 is readily available from the fish and biological processes, and in greater supply than many realize. If you take a look at the photos of my tanks under "Aquariums" below my name on the left, you will see what I consider to be quite good plant growth and there is no CO2 added to any of my tanks. Plant growth is slower but steady and healthy. And the light is in balance, along with the other nutrients. If not, these tanks would not look as they do.

If you want fast plant growth, then adding CO2 is one step. There are very few plants that will not grow without added CO2, in fact I doubt there is a single one; some will do better with added CO2, but the majority grow fine without it. But along with additional CO2 comes additional fertilization and more light, since all this still has to balance. The end result is an aquarium with 4+ times the light it would otherwise require, and daily instead of once or twice a week additions of fertilizer plus far more of it each time. Adding just CO2 will not help the plants if the other nutrients and/or light are inadequate for that level. It is the law of minimum as botanists call it; plants grow at the rate determined by whatever is in least supply. And when something is in excess beyond what the plants can use, algae will quickly take over.

The other issue with this is the effect on the fish of brighter light in particular. The fish we tend to maintain in planted aquaria occur in very dimly-lit waters, many of which never see direct sunlight due to the forest canopy. Some fish species are plainly stressed by bright light, bringing on health issues. I take the view that fish will always be healthier if we replicate their natural habitat conditions as close as we reasonably can. So the plants must be subservient to the fish, not the other way round.

As for adding CO2 now and then, as I hope I've pointed out above, this will do nothing but increase algae and unsettle the fish. The plants can't benefit because the balance is out.

Byron.

zof 08-09-2010 11:16 PM

Heres some posts I found just doing a quick search, I can't vouch for any of them as I have never done it but sounds pretty simple:

http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/d...generator-611/

http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/d...reactor-43164/

But I would agree with Byron, co2 from your fish should be sufficient for the plants to grow, and if your just getting started into the planted scene it will probably be best to go without until you are confident you really want to do it and try to tackle a "HI-Tech" setup.

BradSD 08-10-2010 07:51 AM

Thanks to both of you guys for the information. After reading Byrons post I think I will just give it the complete natural approach. Sounds like its just like using steriods for plants LOL, not to mention the added cost and safety factor.

JohnnyD44 08-10-2010 09:32 AM

agreed, CO2 is definetly usable, but not necessary in a basic approach which is recommended by fellow planted members

stevespurs 03-03-2011 02:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bradsd (Post 443028)
i did a search to find out if any of you have built your own co2 system for your planted aquarium but turned up nothing. If anyone has pulled this off with success i would love some details. I was thinking of maybe using the throw away tanks from a sporting good store made for paintball guns. Buying a regulator of some sort and a needle valve and maybe using an airstone near my filter intake. Is this crazy or posible? I work in a chemical plant and know the dangers of having co2 in your home however i dont think a small disposable canister would be to terribly dangerous. I also wonder if you could just batch in some co2 from time to time, i dont want to purchase a ph controller or any of that really expensive stuff. I love the natural aquarium but i wouldn't mind adding a bit of co2. Any thoughts out there on the subject?

Later,
brad

hi i am new to a planted tank aswell but i have a home made co2 system and my plants seem to be just fine and growing good...i use a 2ltr bottle with a hole in the lid for the air line (pipe)then a stop valve to stop the tank emptying then a diffusser and bubble counter..in the 2lt bottle quarter fill it with hot water and disolve a mug of sugar in it .then get 1 t spoon of yeast place into a cup that has about 2inch of luke warm (not hot)water stir untill all dissolved ,add to 2ltr bottle,then top up bottle to just over 3 quarters (2 inc from top) with warm water ,put hand over and shake..put lid on with the pipe in it(make sure the pipe iss a tight fit ,so no gas escapes ...after 4 hours u should see bubbles ..
This will last for about 1 week or a lil less but cost nx to nothing..hope this helps ...also u can check out utube their are lots of home made co2 set ups ,showing u how to do it...

Mikaila31 03-04-2011 12:50 AM

I greatly enjoy my plant steroid systems. Really bright light, CO2 bubbles, and me pouring fertilizers on the fish does not stop them from breeding.

It is fairly easy to make a CO2 setup if you are familiar with them, yeast type or pressurized. A very budget pressurized system could be make for about $120 with a empty 5lb tank. There is not a lot of risk with a pressurized setup IMO. They are no more or less dangerous then a fire extinguisher, it is a risky practice though to mod a fire extinguisher into a CO2 setup for a tank.

Mikaila31 03-04-2011 07:22 PM

Figures less then 24 hours after I type above post. My 20 oz paintball tank fails 2 hours after getting filled. Not sure what happened exactly, but the safety valve didn't go off. Either they filled it horribly wrong or the main valve/pin is jammed. At least it only holds $4 of CO2, and its failure amused me enough. There was dry ice in the bag lol. Oh irony...


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