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-   -   Serious Duckweed control - Help needed (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-planted-aquarium/serious-duckweed-control-help-needed-44027/)

Angel079 05-30-2010 05:22 PM

Serious Duckweed control - Help needed
 
Guys I need help, some serious help! My 55g's plants are suffering by now. Ever since I lowered the lights my duckweed is EXPLODING I scoop EVERYTHING out each week with the big fish net and then its about 3-4 net's full of it and I flush it but that even does not cut it to keep it under control for at least 1 week to where there's enough light for my plants in the tank and I just don't have the extra time right now to scoop out duckweed every 2nd day but something HAS TO happen to control this stuff better cause my plants can't take much more "darkness".
I mean after about 4-5 days "untouched" I have a solid green surface up top that's about 1/4" thick and allows no more light to get through there :roll:

Is there any such thing then "Weed&Feed" for fish tanks - ANYTHING I can do but scoop out?

Byron 05-30-2010 06:31 PM

Why not remove all of it? Years ago I had duckweed, it came in on some plants (often does). Looked fine for a time, then it also got out of control and kept jamming up my surface skimmers I then had on my filters. I just pulled it all out. Salvinia is similar but it has larger leaves, doesn't reproduce quite so fast, and is more attractive. Or Ceratopteris is a good floating plant. Or Amazon frogbit. Or Pennywort allowed to float.

"Removing" duckweed requires every single speck; if one tiny leaf is left, it will soon begin spreading.

Remember though that all floating plants are fast growers because they are close to the light source, can assimilate CO2 from the air which is 4 times faster than from the water, and are quick users of nutrients via the leaves more than the roots.

Byron.

Angel079 05-31-2010 08:28 AM

Byron I have tried to remove it all, first via the net then I added a cloth to the net to ensure the fine leaves can't get through and apparently that all still wasn't enough and some survived somewhere. I'm beginning to think that unless I take the 55g apart (which I will not given how this tank started!) and "wash" everything I don't know how else to get it all out?
I have a ton other plants too incl Pennyowrt which I periodically take handful's out and give away, THAT at least is easy to control :-)

Mikaila31 05-31-2010 02:15 PM

I would increase the light actually. I've noticed mine doesn't like high light. It was cool at first, but I'm gonna be removing it now. I have not had any major issues and it was helpful when my CO2 was down, I just don't want it anymore.

Angel079 05-31-2010 05:16 PM

Hmm the tank has been doing sooo awesome since I had lowered the lights to only 1@32w....

Wait you say "when co2 was down" so less co2 kills it off too? The only co2 mine get are the fish ... wondering if I could talk them into breathing less?!

teddyzaper 05-31-2010 06:52 PM

lol, i dont really think they would listen, fish can be brats some times. i would recomend scooping as much out as you can then raising the light up, the plants may not grow as fast but it will kill it off then you can take aqay the light.

Also, dont flush it because that is bad and can go to some water source, just put it in your trash can.

Angel079 05-31-2010 08:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by teddyzaper (Post 394851)
Also, dont flush it because that is bad and can go to some water source, just put it in your trash can.

Sometimes I toss it in the trash...I did consider to dump it all in my "lovely" neighbors pond and see what happens (they don't life here anyway) :twisted:
But why is it bad if I flush it? I mean seriously?

Byron 05-31-2010 08:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Angel079 (Post 394951)
Sometimes I toss it in the trash...I did consider to dump it all in my "lovely" neighbors pond and see what happens (they don't life here anyway) :twisted:
But why is it bad if I flush it? I mean seriously?

Don't know where you live, but if you flush it it may well get into the local waterways, depending upon where your sewage goes. In various places in North America duckweed has become a real pest by clogging up local ponds and starving the native plant life. Esp in summer, or year round if you are in the warmer parts of the continent, it will survive.

I chuck my unwanted plants into the compost.

Angel079 05-31-2010 08:45 PM

Well I guess no worries out here int he country cause we're not hooked to the city anyway just a normal septic tank. And I'm in East Tennessee so I'm sure it would survive the summer but def get solid frozen in the winter in that pond, its not uncommon to have negative temps here in Jan.

I'll just keep on scooping and give it my best...Maybe I can convince my gourami's to eat some as alternative food too (that would be nice thou).

Oh Byron I gotta upload you picture soon from the Tiger Lotus its all up to the top now and spreading leaves on the surface, looks too wonderful I think you'd like it :-)

redchigh 06-01-2010 01:20 AM

If you're interested in live foods and don't have moss in that tank you can start feeding your fish scuds...
They eat duckweed, but usually the fish eat them quickly.
My 5G tank is covered in azolla (You think duckweed is bad, this is hellish) until I simply increased the light. lol.
The azolla is still there, but light gets through to below.


Azolla and duckweed are great compost and mulch, they suck all the nutrients right out of the water. :)
Make friends with someone with lots of goldfish, goldfish love it.


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