Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Did i bury my plants to deep (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-planted-aquarium/did-i-bury-my-plants-deep-38343/)

KSASTER2 03-01-2010 02:15 PM

Did i bury my plants to deep
 
5 Attachment(s)
I'm a little worried my plants are burried to deep...but I really have no idea.

Here are pics of the plants in the substrate, are the ok?

stephanieleah 03-01-2010 02:17 PM

I will tell you that I've mastered the inappropriate depth planting method (either too deep or too shallow), and my plants are doing fine. quite well, actually. I always just try to make sure that I'm burying bare stem and if there are leaves then pick them off so they don't get buried in the substrate. they'll just rot and in the meantime use up the plant's energy.

I did want to add that the swords (is that what they are?) may be a little too deep, just lightly sweep away some gravel from around it. the same with the vallis.

KSASTER2 03-01-2010 02:23 PM

8 Attachment(s)
More pics

redchigh 03-01-2010 02:27 PM

I think it would be best if you just told us about how deep they are, and what kind of plants you have there.
(several plants look extremely similiar)

I'm not certain of the plant species, but they look like they're okay...
(are they some type of Sagitarria?)

Oldfishlady 03-01-2010 06:09 PM

For stem plants you really can't plant too deep, but for best root development they need to be shallow with at least one node covered.
Rosette plants (swords, vals, sags etc...) you want the crown above the substrate, when I plant rosette type plants, first I trim the roots to about 1in and then I will push them down into the substrate and then give a slight upward pull to get the crown just above the substrate and the roots pointing down.
Rhizome you don't want to bury them and the roots will find their own way into the substrate or what ever they are tied to.
Bulbs can be partially pushed into the substrate but not buried

Byron 03-01-2010 07:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oldfishlady (Post 335560)
For stem plants you really can't plant too deep, but for best root development they need to be shallow with at least one node covered.
Rosette plants (swords, vals, sags etc...) you want the crown above the substrate, when I plant rosette type plants, first I trim the roots to about 1in and then I will push them down into the substrate and then give a slight upward pull to get the crown just above the substrate and the roots pointing down.
Rhizome you don't want to bury them and the roots will find their own way into the substrate or what ever they are tied to.
Bulbs can be partially pushed into the substrate but not buried

This is very excellent advice; I couldn't say it better. I use exactly the same method for swords.

Ksaster2, the only plants I see that may need attention are the two spotted leaf swords, for both I would gently take hold of a few leaves and just pull slowly upward until you see the white crown where the leaves sprout from. If the crown gets buried, the plant can rot. Otherwise, good looking job.

Byron.


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