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-   -   Anubias Nana not looking so good... and a few other concerns/comments. (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-planted-aquarium/anubias-nana-not-looking-so-good-38320/)

Austin 03-01-2010 02:22 AM

Anubias Nana not looking so good... and a few other concerns/comments.
 
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My anubias nana isn't looking too hot....

Same with my Dwarf Saggitaria. though I'm not concerned about those as much since I know they are pretty easy and I think they might start growing once they get used to the tank... lots of leaves are dying though on them... hoping I see new growth soon. O-o Pic#6 Pic#7

The red melon sword has a new leaf coming in and im watching it. I know that if the leaves appear light green that isn't good right? We'll see how the new leaf looks! Also... some of the roots are able to be seen? Just barely... is this ok? or should i cover it will a few rocks? Doesn't seem like that would make much of a difference anyways. Pic#5

I'm using a liquid fertilizer and no root things or anything of that sort.

Anyways, About the anubias nana... it's leaves look like they are dying off slowly... and I don't see any new growth to make up for it... will you plant experts take a look at it for me? :S Pic#1 Pic#2 Pic#3

Also my comment was how its interesting how my ludwigia came out of the ground (dumb HOB filter that im using while my silicone dries on my internal filter) anyways its cool how it was floating on the top so it grew toward the light. XD Also it seemed to develop quite a few roots while floating... might be the stronger light... Pic#4

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Byron 03-01-2010 12:27 PM

The substrate-rooted plants are planted fine Austin; the crown is not buried.

The yellowing on several plants is most likely nutrient deficiency. Did you not just get these, like last week? It is thus likely due to the shipping; it takes plants a few days, sometimes a couple weeks, to recover. Imagine how you would feel packed in a dark box and bumped all over the place with no food:-(. They need time, and if they are healthy (and they appear to be to my eyes) they will come round.

Liquide fert once or twice a week is fine; follow the directions on the label of whichever one you are using, and don't overdose. The excess minerals can cause other problems for plants and fish.

New leaves are usually lighter green and darked as they mature. The leaves on the sword look fine to me.

One comment on the Anubias, it does not like light; it is a true shade plant. From the photo it seems to be fairly exposed to light; I would consider ways of shading it. It is a great plant for back corners under taller plants, or floating plants help.

Austin 03-01-2010 03:17 PM

Oh, hmm, I don't have many rocks and I don't really see any spots in my tank that gets less light than others. The light seems to be spread out pretty good throughout the tank... :S and atm I don't have any taller plants than that one... :/ Maybe I can try to position some floating plants on top of the light covering it... or cover the patch of light that shines on it maybe? :S

I guess it does get kind of intense light... near the top middle where the light is mostly. I don't think the rock would fit right in the back of the tank, though. Well, I'll try to think about it and come back if I have an idea...

The place where the wisteria is is probably pretty shaded... the front of the tank is the most shaded part and it's in the front corner... the rock would look really weird right there, tho... :S

*rambles* sorry xD

Btw glad to hear you think they are doing ok! :) I fertilized last thursday after they came and this sunday. Did a WC on saturday. Plan to only do sundays. It says once a week.

Oh, btw, how is the copper/stuff inside the fertilizer ok for the fish? Why does the aquasafe "neutralize" it when I add water to my tank, if it's not really harmful to fish (im guessing its not since im adding it for the plants.)

Byron 03-01-2010 08:16 PM

Quote:

Oh, btw, how is the copper/stuff inside the fertilizer ok for the fish? Why does the aquasafe "neutralize" it when I add water to my tank, if it's not really harmful to fish (im guessing its not since im adding it for the plants.)
Of the various mineral micro-nutrients required by aquatic plants, there is iron, copper, zinc, nickel and manganese. These minerals are also known as heavy metals because at high enough levels (this depends upon the mineral) they are toxic to all organisms. Plants and fish will be harmed by an excess of any of them, and if sever enough will be killed outright. Obviously, our goal is to provide the minimal level required by plants, which will not harm them or the fish. We also need copper, it is found in multi-vitamin & mineral supplements; but not in sufficient amounts to kill us.

Many medications are copper based, esp those for parasites like ich. Several warn the aquarist to use at half-strength with sensitive fish and invertebrates, and some believe that plants can be harmed as well. Some fish have very low levels of tolerance; Corydoras catfish and all the characins are particularly adverse to copper, and when it is used these fish usually shown clear signs of stress--rapid respiration, sometimes even gasping air, and lethargy leading to death if the copper is not removed via a water change.

Heavy metals are present in tap water in most areas of North America, in varying degrees. That is why water conditioners detoxify heavy metals. Plants also detoxify heavy metals. "Aquatic plants readily take up heavy metals," writes Diana Walstad, a microbiologist; as she explains, this is not merely as an assimilation of these minerals as nutrients, but rather the plants actually remove the heavy metal from the water and make it ineffective, i.e., detoxifying it just like the water conditioner does. This is yet another benefit of live plants in aquaria; fish are bound to be healthier--but I digress.:-)

There is of course a limit as to how much of these heavy metals the plants can detoxify, just as there is a limit to how much the water conditioner can detoxify. Seachem told me that Prime only works on trace amounts as is normally present in tap water; in excess, Prime is completely ineffective at detoxifying heavy metals. Fortunately, especially so since fish can tolerate far lower levels of some like copper than humans, our water boards regulate the water supply to maintain healthy levels, or so we hope, and the plants and the water conditioner will handle what is present.

In summation, the plants must have these micro-nutrients, and to some extent an excess will be taken up by the plants and detoxified. However, rather than try to figure out the level at which this will no longer work, it is safer not to overdose fertilizers. Long before the mineral may be toxic to fish, some will affect plants negatively if they are at a greater level than what the plant needs as nutrient. This is why I always recommend a balanced comprehensive fertilizer, one that provides the correct amounts in proportion, according to what the plants require; it avoids accidental overdosing that could lead to fish and plant health problems. This is one of the major issues I have with the EI (Estimated Index) method which, in simple terms, means dosing certain mineral nutrients into the tank at levels greater than what the plants can possibly use, then removing the excess with massive water changes before trouble ensues. I really do not see the logic in this method. But I'm digressing again...:hmm:

Hope this helps.
Byron.

JasonI 03-01-2010 09:13 PM

Austin I would like to note in looking at your pictures here that rock you have tied off to your Anubias plant is this some type of salt water rock. I'm not really sure of it's origin but it somewhat something that I have not really seen in fresh water before but I may be wrong just thought you may want to investigate this being that it looks more like live rock not for certain about this. Since I haven't dabbled in salt water really. It can also be the difference in your PH from the PH where you have purchased these plants from remember the water from different parts of the states may have different water paremeters than of that where we're from to. I do agree with what Byron said about this plant needs a more shaded area. If possible try to find a spot where the light is not directly acting as a spot light to this plant. Or you will also have algae problems with this plant if it's in to much light.

Austin 03-01-2010 09:16 PM

Thanks for the indepth reply. :)

Quote:

This is yet another benefit of live plants in aquaria; fish are bound to be healthier--but I digress.:smile:
Do you mean tanks with plants don't make fish healthier? :S It's just for the looks?

@Jason: I bought the rock over 2 years ago and I can't remember what it is. I'm positive I did not buy it from a container with saltwater live rock. I'm pretty sure it was dry when I bought it too. The fish store sold it to me knowing it was going in a freshwater tank... though that doesn't mean much really. I think I originally bought it when I attempted to keep cichlids (heater broke and fried them and they all died except one or two... and I gave up after that... gave the surviving few to the pet store.)... Shouldn't it be inert by now after 2-3 years though either way? :S I have a normal PH of about 7.5-8 which is similar to my tap water and apparently desirable for livebearers which I keep.

Byron 03-02-2010 12:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Austin (Post 335802)
Thanks for the indepth reply. :)

Do you mean tanks with plants don't make fish healthier? :S It's just for the looks?

@Jason: I bought the rock over 2 years ago and I can't remember what it is. I'm positive I did not buy it from a container with saltwater live rock. I'm pretty sure it was dry when I bought it too. The fish store sold it to me knowing it was going in a freshwater tank... though that doesn't mean much really. I think I originally bought it when I attempted to keep cichlids (heater broke and fried them and they all died except one or two... and I gave up after that... gave the surviving few to the pet store.)... Shouldn't it be inert by now after 2-3 years though either way? :S I have a normal PH of about 7.5-8 which is similar to my tap water and apparently desirable for livebearers which I keep.

I said that fish will be healthier in tanks with plants; the plants do things that no filter can. Maintenance is less in a well-planted tank for this reason.


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