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pretzelsz 02-03-2010 08:11 PM

A new addition
 
So i have a 20 gallon tank of fish and i was thinking of getting a new kind of animal. I have already ask people on the fish part and tey said Indian Mudskipper Frogs or a Small Chameleon. I am very interested in Chameleons. is one recommended for a newbie like me? I want to get a 10-20 gallon tank but want to have a well set plan first.

I would like a half water half land animal or a Chameleon.

Nothing that can get out without me wanting it.

bettababy 02-05-2010 02:38 PM

Chameleon and frogs both tend to be wonderful escape artists, so would require a very tightly sealed environment and care would need to be taken whenever opening the tank for maintenance, feeding, etc. Chameleons are very fast and very difficult to catch if they escape. Might want to rethink that idea if escape may be an issue for you.

If you work with a 20 gallon tank maybe you would prefer a newt? Keep in mind, newts also are wonderful escape artists and require a very tightly sealed tank. It doesn't take more than a very small opening for them to find their way out. Another option could be a firebelly toad, as they stay small enough for a 20 gallon tank, but again... escape artists.

As for the mud skippers... they require brackish water and are not a fish I would suggest for a newbie in the hobby. They are a bit more difficult to keep healthy and thriving and are very sensitive to water chemistry.

fishfreak2009 03-19-2010 07:12 AM

It depends what kind of chameleon you are talking about. American chameleons (actually anoles) do move very fast and can easily escape, but old world chameleons move very slowly. However, the old world species do not do well in glass tanks, doing much better in screen enclosures. In a 20 gallon tank with a glass/screen lid you could try:
2 Green Tree Frog
3 Green Anole (1 male, 2 female)
3 Guppy (1 male, 2 female)

If it is a completely terrestrial set-up, you should not put guppies, but if you build a paludarium this would be a very interesting, active setup. Just make sure your lid is tightly sealed (I duct tape mine down when I'm not working in the tank. When I am working in the tank, the animals all go in 5 gallon pails). I am currently setting up a paludarium that houses green tree frogs and danios. As long as you feed the tree frog, it will not bother the fish.

bettababy 03-20-2010 11:40 PM

You are right fishfreak, I apologize for my generalization. Old world chameleons are difficult to keep. Anoles are what I was referring to...

What about a gecko? There are a number of gecko species that stay small enough for a 20 gallon and could thrive if its set up properly...

But...regardless of what you decide on... if you're going the route of anole, gecko, newt, frog, toad, etc... be sure the tank is tightly sealed. They are all great escape artists.

xrayjeeper83 04-25-2010 05:02 PM

the anoles are all over the place down here. I always laugh when I see them at petshops for 6-8 bucks, when I can go outside and get one for free

PartyInMyFishTank 05-01-2010 01:09 PM

i know there is a deffinate chameleon you could have in the tank, which is the pymgmy leaf chmaleon, they get to a size of about 4". Also like said, geckos are also an option, if its a 20 long you could flip it on its side and copnvert it into a crested gecko tank, or if its a 20tall its perfect for one(or there are many other types cute small geckos, my favorite is viper geckos). but i owned 2 of the pygmy leafs and they are very fun to watch them do what they do, and i should add that these guys are EXTREMELY slow. so no worrying about them escaping without you knowing. i was also able to successfully breed them and hatch the eggs, but if anything try and find captive breed chameleons, they are so small and when they are wild caught they usually have a lot of parasites and will most likely die within 6-7 months, but usually before they pass the female will lay eggs and then you have parasite free captive chameleons.. http://www.herpfamily.com/docs/Beard...Chameleon.html this is agreat care sheet on the guys, but if you like the crested gecko idea they arent a huge read about to know about thing. also a ten tank is tons of room for 2 if carefully planted, also 12-20 gallon would even be better. i would highly recommend this type of chameleon for a beginner, just please be sure to not neglect them and to take your time setting up the enclosure.


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