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-   -   new cycled tank, water cloudy from substrate, safe for fish? (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/new-cycled-tank-water-cloudy-substrate-36391/)

Lynda B 02-01-2010 08:31 AM

new cycled tank, water cloudy from substrate, safe for fish?
 
We put up my 46 gallon bow front on Saturday. This tank is replacing an existing smaller tank with:

1 rainbow shark
2 blood parrot cichlids
3 golden gouramis

I got super cloudy water from my substrate in the 46 even though I'd rinsed. The filter's been doing a great job and the cloudiness is pretty much subsided, although I can see "dust" on the filter intake and some decor I put in there.

We had used existing filter media and water from two existing tanks to prepare this tank on Saturday. My numbers are running true to the existing tank. PH 6.8, Nitrites 0, Ammonia 0, Nitrates 5.

With the cloudiness, is it safe to transfer the fish to the tank?

The other thing I'm curious about is that even though I'm considering this tank "cycled", is there a possibility that I'll undergo an ammonia spike once I place the fish in there?

I can keep the smaller tank running as long as I have to, no problem. I do not want to endanger my fish. Their health and well-being are my ultimate concern.

Thanks!

Angel079 02-01-2010 09:30 AM

That cloudiness from what you're describing there is just due to debris kicked out of the substrate. Between the filter and your weekly w/c that'll come right out. Its lil particles from the substrate that simple settled "down" on your decor etc.
That is no problem at all. As long as you tank's been properly seeded (sounds like it) and the readings stay low once you added your fish over the next few days (I'd keep checking each day and do a w/c if need be) you're just fine there!
It CAN theoretically spike up yes; but in all my tanks I newly set up over the yrs that been seeded and stocked I never seen it happening.

Lynda B 02-01-2010 09:41 AM

Thank you for your response.

I did realize that the dust is from the gravel, so know that it will go away. But I didn't want my poor fish to be coughing up a um gill..... :-P

Great strategy went into setting up this new tank so that it wouldn't need to be cycled. I'm thrilled with the numbers. We did the first reading 24 hours after filling. We'll do another tonight. If the numbers are still cohesive, I might transfer my fin-kids over. Thanks again!

1077 02-01-2010 11:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lynda B (Post 317090)
Thank you for your response.

I did realize that the dust is from the gravel, so know that it will go away. But I didn't want my poor fish to be coughing up a um gill..... :-P

Great strategy went into setting up this new tank so that it wouldn't need to be cycled. I'm thrilled with the numbers. We did the first reading 24 hours after filling. We'll do another tonight. If the numbers are still cohesive, I might transfer my fin-kids over. Thanks again!

Numbers will be zero if no fish are present in the seeded tank. If the bacteria in the borrowed filter material has no food from either fishes,or fish food,it will begin to die off.
Often people make the mistake of adding borrowed filter material from an existing tank but fail to add fish ,fish food ,or other source of ammonia. They then perhaps don't add fish for a few days or a week. The bacteria in the meantime has largely died off. Once you place borrowed material in new filter,you must also provide it with food ,either by adding a few fish,or by some other method.
If your smaller tank is still running, I would take a couple fish from that tank and place them in the new tank to prevent the bacteria from dying off as described.
Would also monitor water to check for ammonia levels and or nitrites that may or may not present the need for water change(s). Hope this helps.

Lynda B 02-01-2010 12:06 PM

Thank you, very helpful. :-)

Byron 02-01-2010 03:55 PM

I fully concur with 1077's advice.

Nitrosomonas and nitrospira bacteria can begin to die off in less than a day if ammonia is not present. These bacteria only live as long as they have "food" (ammonia and nitrite respectively), and if this increases beyond their present numbers, it takes approx 9 hours for nitrosomonas and approx 20 hours for nitrospira to multiply which they do by binary division continually in those time frames until they reach a number sufficient for the "food."

If your fish are in an existing tank, I would move one over, wait a couple days and test, then move another, etc., moving the three gourami at the same time.

By the way, using "old" water is no benefit. The bacteria colonize hard surfaces under water, so filter media, plants, wood and rocks, substrate will carry over bacteria, water will not. However, in your case you may have transferred ammonia with the water, and that will feed some of the bacteria for bit longer. Also, at an acidic pH your ammonia will change to ammonium which is basically harmless to the fish, so it will be the nitrite stage of the nitrification cycle that is critical in your case.

Byron.

Lynda B 02-02-2010 10:08 AM

Moved the gouramis over and all is well. Readings remain consistent. Water is not so cloudy and the filter is doing its job. :-)

Byron 02-02-2010 11:34 AM

Sounds good. Keep us posted especially if anything changes. B.

Lynda B 02-08-2010 07:29 AM

All the fish are now in the new tank and doing beautifully. Readings remain consistent. I'm a happy fish momma. :)

Byron 02-08-2010 01:39 PM

I like hearing good news. Well done. B.


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