Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Plant stupid (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-planted-aquarium/plant-stupid-36288/)

Mean Harri 01-30-2010 03:38 PM

Plant stupid
 
Ok so i am thinking of getting an Echinodorus Rubin.

There is this Sweet Aquatics
Looks to be just a plant 12" in height.

Then there is this plant potted
Sweet Aquatics

Product height 8" Why is the potted shorter? Is the potted one meant to plant as in remove from pot and plant it? What the difference between the two? I don't get why one is potted and one is not. And the one that is NOT potted is taller which is what I want in this species to start off with. It's getting very frustrating trying to figure this crap out. Now we know why there are fake plants.

I can't get my head around potted plants and the individual plants. potted plants seem to be individual plants but you can get them potted or not. So what's the difference. This will make me blow a fuse I can feel it.

stephanieleah 01-30-2010 03:45 PM

Yes, you remove the pot. Someone just posted a pot vs. non-potted thread so it's fresh in my head.

The potted usually contains ONE plant with a more extensive root system.

The non-potted usually has two or three plants with less developed root system.

Both are okay and personally I go by price. The little one will grow up like the big one (assuming all else is the same...I didn't look at the link).

btw the sweet aquatics plants are SO healthy when they arrive, it's great.

Mean Harri 01-30-2010 03:52 PM

I don't comprehend that stephanie, sorry. The not potted plant that I linked is 12" tall. It appears to be 1 plant. The potted one that I linked is 8" and appears to be 1 plant. If the potted one has a more extensive root system I would assume it's older. If it's older why is it 8" compared to the non potted one that is 12" and presumably less root extensive and younger because it is not potted but is 12" tall. Taller is older I would think.

Mean Harri 01-30-2010 04:39 PM

Ok so I am in the process of drawing out the layout for the plants in the tank and looking at plants and going back and forth and wow. I think I have a layout. I've changed it a few times but i believe I have exactly what I am going to do. As soon as I get the potted v. non potted issue answered I'll be less wired. Waiting for e mail reply from sweet aquatics.

As a tip for those setting up a 55g or 75g a legal sized envelope works great to sketch on. It is similar in dimensions to these two tanks sizes wider and narrower. Just a tip from your Unca Harri lol

Angel079 01-30-2010 07:45 PM

So far anything I ordered from this place for 1) was far taller/ bigger then they posted on their site and 2) anything I gotten had good root system.
Mary prop won't be able to get to you till Monday....They're good store really just not so good in promoting themselves well online IMO

Mean Harri 01-30-2010 07:52 PM

She wrote back already. Better customer service than even you anticipated lol

Angel079 01-30-2010 08:00 PM

That gal sits working at THE most wicket hours of the day LMAO, she's super nice thou.

stephanieleah 01-30-2010 11:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mean Harri (Post 316011)
I don't comprehend that stephanie, sorry. The not potted plant that I linked is 12" tall. It appears to be 1 plant. The potted one that I linked is 8" and appears to be 1 plant. If the potted one has a more extensive root system I would assume it's older. If it's older why is it 8" compared to the non potted one that is 12" and presumably less root extensive and younger because it is not potted but is 12" tall. Taller is older I would think.

I agree but from my exp when it's potted the roots are thicker and more established looking for whatever reason.

Byron 01-31-2010 01:02 PM

The same plant species can grow/develop differently depending upon the circumstances.

The root system of a sword will develop according to the nutrients, but in general each species will have similar root systems. They will spread out if given adequate room, and Echinodorus need a good deep and lateral substrate to do this for the best growth of the plant.

The leaf growth will depend also on nutrients but equally on light. Under brighter light the leaves of many Echinodorus species will be smaller.

So it makes absolutely no difference how big the plant is when you acquire it; if you were to buy one potted at 8 inches and one non-potted at 12 inches, of the same species, say E. bleheri, both will grow to exactly the same leaf size and root system in the same aquarium. In another thread I mentioned the cost difference between potted and non-potted plants; as the potted are normally much higher in cost, I seldom buy them, preferring the non-potted which even though having smaller root systems, will I know grow just as well in the proper environment.

One other comment on plants grown emersed versus submersed, which was mentioned by Harri in another thread. Plants which are bog plants in nature, as are all Echinodorus, spend half the year under water (submersed) and half in the air (emersed) with the roots perpetually in "water" whether bog, marsh, or streambed. All species adapt to permanent submersed conditions (in the aquarium) so this has no impact on whether or not they will live in the aquarium. Nurseries prefer growing these plants emersed because it is faster and therefore less expensive. I've mentioned elsewhere about plants assimilating CO2 from air four times faster than they can from water. So with comparable light and in the air the plants will grow four times faster, which means the nursery can sell them four times quicker and that means saving money. However, be prepared for a very different looking plant in your aquarium.

The emersed leaves are different from submersed leaves in their structure. But while that just occurs and basically has no bearing for the aquarist, the difference often extends to the shape and size of the leaf. That is why when you buy swords from the store or online that were grown emersed and you plant them in the aquarium fully submersed, the existing leaves usually die and new growth will be sometimes vastly different. This is one reason why identification of aquarium plants can be tricky; sometimes only the flower can be used to identify the exact species.

The intensity of light can also affect leaf shape and size. With Echinodorus, generally speaking brighter light means smaller leaves; this is especially true of the pygmy chain sword species like E. tenellus and E. quadricostatus. It also affects the red leaf species, most of which are nursery hybrids. Brighter light is required to keep them bright red because red leaves appear red due to reflecting red light, so they need more of it to photosynthesize.

Byron.

Mean Harri 01-31-2010 01:11 PM

Thanks Byron. That confirms what Mary at Sweet Aquatic said about potted plants being grown emersed and loose root plants are grown submerged. Stephanie posted a link to a website in another thread that has an article on plants grown emersed and states they will shed their leaves and new leaves will grow in. That is good to know because I would assume when starting a new planted tank you don't want all your new plants shedding and starting anew. Therefore I will look at buying more plants that are grown submerged.


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