Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/)
-   Beginner Saltwater Aquariums (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-saltwater-aquariums/)
-   -   FO (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-saltwater-aquariums/fo-33655/)

nfored 12-11-2009 08:03 AM

FO
 
Can you have a FO tank with just a Canister filter? and then plumb the Canister to the Protein Skimmer?

I have a 55 Gallon tank, and would be building a DIY Skimmer. The tank is not drilled so I would like to use a Canister Over a Sump, but could go sump if I have to. I have been trying to find information on properly setting up a FO tank. Any pointers to articles or what ever would be nice. I have no problem reading and I am not asking for anyone to hold me had just point me in a good research direction.

I will be keeping ClownFish ( 2 or 4) and 2 or 4 Bicolor Pseudochromis

wake49 12-11-2009 09:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nfored (Post 288217)
Can you have a FO tank with just a Canister filter? and then plumb the Canister to the Protein Skimmer?

I have a 55 Gallon tank, and would be building a DIY Skimmer. The tank is not drilled so I would like to use a Canister Over a Sump, but could go sump if I have to. I have been trying to find information on properly setting up a FO tank. Any pointers to articles or what ever would be nice. I have no problem reading and I am not asking for anyone to hold me had just point me in a good research direction.

I will be keeping ClownFish ( 2 or 4) and 2 or 4 Bicolor Pseudochromis

You should be fine keeping a canister filter on a 55 gallon FO tank, as long as you keep up with maintenance. The Protein Skimmer will help keep down on Dissolved Organic Solids, but larger particulates will get caught in the filter pads. These will break down into Nitrates and Phosphates, major contributors to nuisance algaes. As long as you clean the filter pads regularly (it might be as much as every other day, depending on feedings and such), you shouldn't have a problem.

About the Skimmer. You should just invest in a Hang on Top Skimmer, as I don't think you can plumb it into the canister. The problem is that the back pressure from the canister pulling off the outlet of the skimmer will probably mess with the counter-current and reduce contact time with the bubbles. I would simply use a HOT Skimmer like the Coralife Super Skimmer Needle Wheel 125. Just take the foam pads out as they become detritus traps themselves...

Pasfur 12-11-2009 11:55 PM

I agree mostly with Wake on this. Plumbing the water into a canister first, and then into the skimmer, would reduce the benefits of the skimmer. Water first passing through a filter pad inside the canister would result in organic breakdown into Nitrate, lessening the benefits of the skimmer.

If this were my tank, I would use live rock, aragonite sand, and a protein skimmer as my only methods of filtration. In fact, this is how my 180 is set up for FOWLR. http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/s...f-build-21979/

wake49 12-12-2009 07:20 AM

Yeah, I agree that Live Rock, Live Sand and a Protein Skimmer are the only methods of filtration I use. I just saw that the poster was starting a FO tank.

Maybe I should have asked this from the start: Can you give us more specifics on your system? Are you using Live Rock/Sand? How much if you are? Can you test your water and post the results of Calcium, Alkalinity, pH, Nitrate, Nitrite, Ammonia and Salinity?

Pasfur 12-12-2009 07:32 AM

I should have also continued my response.

This canister filter topic comes up every month or so, and it is really one of the topics that is worthy of debate on a fish only system. Canister filters are very powerful organic removers if the activated carbon is frequently changed, and the prefilter pads are rinsed several times per week. Using a canister filter which is not connected to the protein skimmer on a fish only system certainly has the opportunity to provide benefits.

The problem lies in human nature, which is to allow the canister to go longer periods of time without a cleaning than would be desirable for positive results. Canisters quickly provide the negative results of phosphates and nitrates if the maintenance schedule is not followed religiously. Given the large volume of water these filters push, these negative features can cause quick problems for alkalinity as well.

Bottom line, the danger in misusing a canister filter is extremely high, and most of the benefits can be achieved more easily with a quality skimmer.

One final thought. Many canister filters offer a diatom filter sleeve for a quick polishing of the water. These sleeves are also effective at removing some pathogens from the water, and some authors have written that they find these highly effective for spot treatments of aquariums being treated for ich. I have personally never used this technique.

At this point, we should start the discussion with the series of questions Wake asks above.

nfored 12-14-2009 03:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wake49 (Post 288479)
Yeah, I agree that Live Rock, Live Sand and a Protein Skimmer are the only methods of filtration I use. I just saw that the poster was starting a FO tank.

Maybe I should have asked this from the start: Can you give us more specifics on your system? Are you using Live Rock/Sand? How much if you are? Can you test your water and post the results of Calcium, Alkalinity, pH, Nitrate, Nitrite, Ammonia and Salinity?


Okay, I have about 30 LBS of dead rock, it was once in a marine tank about 1 year ago, however I removed it from the marine tank that My friend tore down. I then let it dry for a month and put it in fresh water, I will likely buy some more of the rock from my LFS however the rock I will buy, looks more like and is priced more like base rock rather then live rock.

I will be buying about 50 or so LBS of Aragonite and Crushed Coral Mix. I was thinking about buying a 36" shop light with dual lamps, and get 50/50 bulbs.

I have nothing in the tank right now, I am in the research phase, I don't like to jump into something without knowing at least all the basics, and having a Good understanding, of what I am getting into.

If I remember right my tap water ph is about 7.8 or 8.2 big difference I know, I just haven't tested in a while. The nitrate is 20ppm, the nitrite is undetectable, and ammonia is 1ppm.


So everyone is thinking I can skip the canister and sump and get just a protein skimmer?

wake49 12-14-2009 06:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nfored (Post 289407)
So everyone is thinking I can skip the canister and sump and get just a protein skimmer?

Yes.

You might want to get a filter for your tap water for that ammonia and nitrate, plus any other nasties that are in the water.

nfored 12-14-2009 07:05 AM

The ammonia is from Chloramines, which is removed using prime, however it leaves the ammonia, even using RO I was not able to remove all of the ammonia, or nitrate. However it was a $120 6 stage RO unit so maybe the quality is not the best, and might have been reduced more with a higher quality unit.

wake49 12-14-2009 07:22 AM

What kind of prefilters are in your RO? Does it have a Di on it?

nfored 12-14-2009 08:15 AM

It was in this order Sediment Filter - Granulated Carbon - Coconut Carbon - RO Membrane - DI #1 - DI # 2

Its from Pure Water Club, I think the housing is just fine, I think its the filter media that needs to be higher quality. Maybe replacing the two carbon filters with catalytic carbon to remove chlorimine, and then getting a name brand RO membrane.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:41 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2