Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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jjtf00 11-11-2009 08:56 PM

bio balls
 
what would happen if i removed my filter pad in my hang on filter and replaced it with bio balls?

bettababy 11-11-2009 11:24 PM

That depends on what you are trying to accommodate and how it is set up. Can you list the details of the tank and its inhabitants?

jjtf00 11-12-2009 12:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bettababy (Post 272629)
That depends on what you are trying to accommodate and how it is set up. Can you list the details of the tank and its inhabitants?

a fish only tank. i have a top fin 30 hang on filter, a aqua clear power head, about 15-20 pounds of live rock and about 30-40 pounds of live sand.

bettababy 11-12-2009 11:47 AM

Ok, without knowing the size of the tank and its inhabitants (or planned inhabitants), so this is still going to be a difficult thing to give a positive answer. Let me explain it this way...

A tanks inhabitants or planned inhabitants should dictate the environment needed and created. If this is a fish only tank and heavily stocked, then the use of carbon at some regular basis would not be a bad idea. While live rock and bioballs are a great filter media, they are not something I would suggest for a fish only tank unless there is a refugium and/or sump system set up. Important factors such as food consumption by animals and environment should be considered. Various types of reef animals help to keep the water chemistry balanced by consuming and/or breaking down waste levels, and it should be understood that everything natural in a marine environment serves some environmental purpose.

It shuold also be understood that pad filter medias are more able to trap solid debris and waste, such as bits of food... and are thus more easily cleaned (in dirty tank water during water changes) than bioballs and live rock. What types of food are going into the tank should be considered for this reason, also. Fish such as triggers, eels, lionfish, and most other predators, tend to be much messier eaters than fish like damsels, clownfish, etc.

I notice you don't mention a skimmer being used on this tank... that is another factor to consider. How much of what needs to be removed can best be removed from this tank? A skimmer is always a big plus and a huge help in keeping the water quality stable.

What it boils down to is your individual choice as relates to your tanks specific needs.

Can I ask why you are considering this change in the first place?

If you can offer a more detailed description of the tank and/or some photos, I would feel more confortable in offering some solid suggestions.

jjtf00 11-12-2009 05:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bettababy (Post 272801)
Ok, without knowing the size of the tank and its inhabitants (or planned inhabitants), so this is still going to be a difficult thing to give a positive answer. Let me explain it this way...

A tanks inhabitants or planned inhabitants should dictate the environment needed and created. If this is a fish only tank and heavily stocked, then the use of carbon at some regular basis would not be a bad idea. While live rock and bioballs are a great filter media, they are not something I would suggest for a fish only tank unless there is a refugium and/or sump system set up. Important factors such as food consumption by animals and environment should be considered. Various types of reef animals help to keep the water chemistry balanced by consuming and/or breaking down waste levels, and it should be understood that everything natural in a marine environment serves some environmental purpose.

It shuold also be understood that pad filter medias are more able to trap solid debris and waste, such as bits of food... and are thus more easily cleaned (in dirty tank water during water changes) than bioballs and live rock. What types of food are going into the tank should be considered for this reason, also. Fish such as triggers, eels, lionfish, and most other predators, tend to be much messier eaters than fish like damsels, clownfish, etc.

I notice you don't mention a skimmer being used on this tank... that is another factor to consider. How much of what needs to be removed can best be removed from this tank? A skimmer is always a big plus and a huge help in keeping the water quality stable.

What it boils down to is your individual choice as relates to your tanks specific needs.

Can I ask why you are considering this change in the first place?

If you can offer a more detailed description of the tank and/or some photos, I would feel more confortable in offering some solid suggestions.

i have pictures posted on aonther thread. it is a fish only tank. my LPS ordered me a protein skimmer it should be coming in soon..

rsheets 11-12-2009 11:56 PM

make sure you get enough bio balls. They have a rating like so many balls per gallon.

Pasfur 11-13-2009 09:14 PM

After seeing pictures of your tank, there is nothing good that could come from using bioballs. You have no need for additional biological filtration. In fact, bioballs will cause Nitrates to increase, which alone is enough of a reason not to use them on a tank with your sand depth and live rock.

For now, just use that hang on filter with activated carbon. After your protein skimmer arrives you will be in great shape.

bettababy 11-14-2009 11:46 PM

I haven't had time to look for the other thread... could someone please post a link? Thanks in advance.


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