Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Stringy algee? Help (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-planted-aquarium/stringy-algee-help-31517/)

Candee 11-01-2009 10:39 AM

Stringy algee? Help
 
I just set up my aquarium this weekend. used 50g tank - cleaned it out really good. Filter also used but I had the guy at the aquarium store clean and gut the filter out. Gravel is new. But I did take a few plants that the previous owners had and bought new plants. The plants that the previous owners had are now growing a stringy algae. I'll post a pic to show u what I mean.
Should I take the plants out before they contaminate my new plants or should I treat them some how?

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y79...ium/Okt239.jpg

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y79...ium/Okt238.jpg

Byron 11-01-2009 01:01 PM

Algae is a natural part of an aquatic ecosystem and occurs in all healthy aquaria. But, we keep it under control. And in a planted aquarium, this is very easy provided everything is in balance. The plants use the available nutrients in the presence of light, and the light is sufficient to balance the available nutrients. Algae doesn't stand a chance at overtaking the plants. The trick is to have good plant growth and sufficient for the system.

If you post your light specs (assuming fluorescent, so what is the tube name and wattage), what fish are in the tank (if any yet), and if you intend to have CO2 added (not necessary, but some do), I can add more.

Byron.

Jack Middleton 11-01-2009 01:32 PM

A flow and unstable CO2 related issue, Are you running any form of DIY CO2?

Candee 11-01-2009 02:03 PM

No fishes yet

Tubes are
sera plant color 25 watt 4900 kelvin
sera royal sky blue 25 watt 12000 kelvin

No CO2

Just noticed I spelled Algae in my title wrong... I do know how to spell most of the time lol

Byron 11-01-2009 02:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Candee (Post 267105)
No fishes yet

Tubes are
sera plant color 25 watt 4900 kelvin
sera royal sky blue 25 watt 12000 kelvin

No CO2

Just noticed I spelled Algae in my title wrong... I do know how to spell most of the time lol

This will work. Keep the light on for 10 hours a day to start (a timer works best, as a regular period of light/dark is better for plants and fish).

Obviously there will be minimal CO2 without fish in the tank, so you can add some fish now, whatever you intend to have, a few at first. The plants will handle the cycling. Fertilizer will be needed in balance with the light and CO2, and I would suggest a good complete liquid once a week. Seachem's Flourish Comprehensive Supplement for the Planted Aquarium is good, and the Kent Freshwater Plant Supplement works fine too. As you have some swords, which are heavy root feeders, substrate fertilizer for these would help them. I use Nutrafin's Plant-Gro sticks, one next to each of the larger swords works wonders. Seachem also make a root tab in the Flourish line which I have not used, and they are more expensive and need replacing more often. If you go with the root fert, I would hold off on the liquid for a week or two so as not to overload the system with nutrients. Algae is frequently present in new tanks, no point in encouraging it. The plants will be efficient at using the nutrients, but without much CO2 the others need to be balanced down as well.

Expect some of the existing leaves to yellow and die, that is common esp with swords that are newly purchased or moved if the water parameters are vastly different. As long as new growth can be seen emerging from the centre at the crown of the plant (after a few days in the new tank) they will be fine. That type of algae usually attacks leaves that are in the first stages of dying, interestingly, so they will probably be coming off anyway.

Byron.

Candee 11-01-2009 02:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 267112)
This will work. Keep the light on for 10 hours a day to start (a timer works best, as a regular period of light/dark is better for plants and fish).

Obviously there will be minimal CO2 without fish in the tank, so you can add some fish now, whatever you intend to have, a few at first. The plants will handle the cycling. Fertilizer will be needed in balance with the light and CO2, and I would suggest a good complete liquid once a week. Seachem's Flourish Comprehensive Supplement for the Planted Aquarium is good, and the Kent Freshwater Plant Supplement works fine too. As you have some swords, which are heavy root feeders, substrate fertilizer for these would help them. I use Nutrafin's Plant-Gro sticks, one next to each of the larger swords works wonders. Seachem also make a root tab in the Flourish line which I have not used, and they are more expensive and need replacing more often. If you go with the root fert, I would hold off on the liquid for a week or two so as not to overload the system with nutrients. Algae is frequently present in new tanks, no point in encouraging it. The plants will be efficient at using the nutrients, but without much CO2 the others need to be balanced down as well.

Expect some of the existing leaves to yellow and die, that is common esp with swords that are newly purchased or moved if the water parameters are vastly different. As long as new growth can be seen emerging from the centre at the crown of the plant (after a few days in the new tank) they will be fine. That type of algae usually attacks leaves that are in the first stages of dying, interestingly, so they will probably be coming off anyway.

Byron.


I just added the water yesterday. Are u sure adding fish so soon is ok? Everyone has been telling me I have to let the water cycle for 2-3 weeks before adding fish.

Byron 11-01-2009 03:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Candee (Post 267127)
I just added the water yesterday. Are u sure adding fish so soon is ok? Everyone has been telling me I have to let the water cycle for 2-3 weeks before adding fish.

Letting the water sit for 2-3 weeks or any length of time will do nothing to establish the cycle. This will take some explaining, so here goes. Planted tanks and non-planted tanks are biologically different, by which I mean that the biological processes acting on ammonia operate differently.

The nitrification cycle has to do with various types of nitrogen. There is ammonia, ammonium, nitrite and nitrate. Ammonia in acidic water (pH below 7) converts to ammonium which is basically harmless to fish and plants; ammonia is highly toxic to both fish and plants, and nitrite is slightly less toxic. Nitrate is basically harmless at normal (low) levels. Test kits mostly read ammonia/ammonium as ammonia; and ammonia detoxifiers (such as Prime water conditioner) do so by converting ammonia to ammonium.

In a non-planted tank, the ammonia produced by the fish and biological actions has to be "consumed" by nitrosomonas bacteria, and nitrite is produced as a result. Nitrosomonas bacteria consume both ammonia and ammonium, whichever is present. A second group of bacteria, called nitrospira [used to be thought to be nitrobacter] consume the nitrite and produce nitrate. This is called the nitrification cycle. A source of ammonia has to be added to the tank to start the cycle. Fish can do this, or non-fish cycling using pure ammonia, fish food, pieces of shrimp, etc. The nitrification cycle in any of these conditions takes from 2 to 8 weeks to establish itself, and this period is dependant upon a number of factors including water parameters (temp, pH, hardness). The various bacteria multiply in porportion to the available "food" they need, and when the tank is "cycled" it means that the level of nitrosomonas and nitrospira are adequate for the amount of ammonia dn nitrite that is available. The bacteria will increase if ammonia/nitrite increase (adding more fish, overfeeding, dead matter) and they will reduce (die off) if the ammonia/nitrite is reduced (removing fish, etc.). They remain in balance, and the tank is said to be biologically balanced with respect to the nitrification cycle.

In a planted tank, by which we mean a tank that is fairly heavily planted (not just a few plants), things work very differently. One of the nutrients plants must have is nitrogen. Scientific studies have proven that plants prefer nitrogen as ammonium, given the option. In acidic water, the ammonia produced by the fish is converted to ammonium and the plants grab it, almost all of it unless the tank is way out of balance. In basic (alkaline) water they take the ammonia and through the cell structure have a process that changes it to ammonium which they then use in photosynthesis. There is some evidence they can also use nitrite by converting it back to ammonium. And they use niotrate in the same way. However, the last process is certainly more involved for them, so their preference is to use ammonia/ammonium directly. They do this so well that the nitrification bacteria will be far less in a planted aquarium because there is not much ammonia or nitrite left after the plants grab it. The plants act as a sort of cycling by themselves, except they just take the ammonia and its gone.

So, in a planted tank, you can add fish on day one, and provided there are not many of them, the plants will grab the ammonia/ammonium and there is literally no establishment of a nitrification cycle, or to be more exact, it will establish itself but the fish will have no stress resulting from the cycling because the plants have consumed most of the ammonia. Planted tank authors have frequently written of this, and I have set up several planted tanks with fish the first day. In July I reset my 115g tank, put the plants and fish from the existing 90g in over two days (plants day one, 95 fish day two) and ammonia and nitrite were zero from day 1; nitrate was 5 and has remained at 5 ever since. There was no nitrification cycle to speak of, because the plants utilized the ammonia/ammonium from the start. Even with 95 fish, none were lost, and the only stress visible was the normal stress a fish goes through when it is netted out of a tank and into another. It is true that bacteria were probably on the wood and plant leaves I moved over. But years ago (1997/8) another experience is even more telling.

I was losing fish daily in my 115g tank, and those that were alive were extremely lethargic; the reason after weeks of testing and trying everything turned out to be a toxic substance leeching from two of the pieces of wood in the tank. I had to disinfect the entire tank to get rid of whatever it was. In one day, the fish were netted out into a spare 33g, the wood was discarded, the filter media was discarded, the plants were pulled out and washed as best as I could, the gravel was washed bucket by bucket in water as hot as I could stand, and the tank put back together and filled, and the fish added (about 90 of them), all within 12 hours. There could not have been one iota of bacteria, but not one fish died, ammonia and nitrite were zero. The plants did their job.

You can add a few fish, and gradually build the community. Use a good water conditioner before adding the fish (I always wait for the first fish to use conditioner, but doesn't matter as long as it's used).

Byron.


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