Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   algae eater and cycling questions (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/algae-eater-cycling-questions-306/)

kevilknc 08-25-2006 03:11 PM

algae eater and cycling questions
 
Hi, I've been lurking for about a week now, this is my first post. I recently obtained a ten gallon tank and its been cycling for about 3 days now with 2 zebra danios and 3 marble mollies. I've read a lot about cycling on this and other sites, but I still have a few questions about the process.

Since I am cycling with fish, I need to keep the ammonia level low, right? From what I've read, this is accomplished by frequent water changes, about 20% every 3 days. Just wondering if this info is accurate. I did a 15% water change this morning, so I want to make sure I'm on the right track here as I am new at this hobby :)

Also, and totally unrelated, when can I get an algae eater/bottom feeder? Does the tank need to be fully cycled before I can get one?

Thanks in advance

Nick 08-25-2006 03:25 PM

Hi and welcome to fishforum
I think you are on the right track about the cycling. I see your going the fish way and thats fine. The water changes dont hurt the cycle, because to much ammonia will kill the fish. And you have gotten the hardy fishe's for the cycle. Good job. Just keep going on the cycle and keep testing the water. You want it at 0 ammonia, 0 nitrite, and anywhere above 0 for nitrate, 5-10 is fine.

For the algea eater, you only have a 10 gallon tank so I wouldnt recommend a pleco. Unless you are upgrading :D. I think you should wait for the bottom feeder/ algea eater because he wouldnt have any algea to feed off of since the tank is new. People can correct here if I'm wrong on this. And personnaly I'm not going to recommend any type of algea eater because I dont like giving out bad advice...hope it all works out if you have anymore questions than feel free!

Nick

kevilknc 08-25-2006 07:04 PM

Thanks for the reply. I have one other question that has been nagging me. Once the cycle has been completed and all that remains are nitrates, how do you get rid of those? I have read that live plants work well, but is that the best option besides changing the water every so often? and if changing the water is the best option, how often and how much should be changed?

Nick 08-25-2006 09:09 PM

the nitrates shouldnt get out of hand that much. you want it under 40, is fine depending on how many fish there is in here. and yes live plants eat the nitrates ( dont know a better word ). Also water changes. Weekly water changes is fine

Lupin 08-26-2006 01:01 AM

Nick's quite right with the instructions.http://www.tropicalfish.site5.com/ubb/wink.gif
Allow the nitrates to run under 40 but not under 10. Under 10 risks the growth of BGA(blue-green algae) which can be difficult to remove.
Quote:

Originally Posted by kevilknc
Also, and totally unrelated, when can I get an algae eater/bottom feeder? Does the tank need to be fully cycled before I can get one?

Go with otocinclus. As they are quite delicate, you have to wait until the tank is established for around 3 months. Make sure your tank is fully cycled.
Water changes really depends on how heavily stocked your tank is. With the current stocks, weekly water changes is fine as Nick had said.

Kevil, pls avoid this fish.
Chinese Algae Eater(CAE)
http://mud.mm-a8.yimg.com/image/2893135236.jpg
They grow to 25 cm thus outgrowing your tank. Not a community fish anyway as they developed a taste for mucous membrane or slime coat of the fish.

My advice: Before buying a fish, do a research. Don't buy a fish on impulse without knowing its requirements.

Tracy 08-27-2006 12:31 AM

Yeah what Blue said; I used to have Black Moors (of the goldfish family) and the algae eaters were just NASTY; they did suck the slime off the fish, and left the poor things with awful white marks on their bodies, and eventually the fish died :( I prefer Plecostaums' myself, but they need a larger aquarium.

Lupin 08-27-2006 05:55 AM

There are smaller plecs like the clown plecs and bristlenose but they'll need a 15 gallons minimum. Only one will fit in it of course to reduce chances of overcrowding.:)

joeshmoe 08-27-2006 11:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by blue_gourami45
Yeah what Blue said; I used to have Black Moors (of the goldfish family) and the algae eaters were just NASTY; they did suck the slime off the fish, and left the poor things with awful white marks on their bodies, and eventually the fish died :( I prefer Plecostaums' myself, but they need a larger aquarium.

i had same fish do the same thing but they died of ick from the stress :(

Lupin 08-27-2006 06:48 PM

Cold water=suitable environment for ich.http://www.tropicalfish.site5.com/ubb/wink.gif
While life cycle may be slowly, they thrive better in a cold temp. It has been known that 32 degrees can kill the ich although it's more on speeding up the life cycle just to make them go into free-swimming stage where meds and salt will destroy them easily.
Hence the warm temp adjustment is recommended during ich treatment.:)


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