Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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JonandJo 11-13-2013 11:59 AM

Question 3 of 3
 
Natural vs chemical ph alteration.

Which is best form of bringing a ph level down. If it's natural what would you use to do this.

Roccus 11-13-2013 12:25 PM

I think the unanamus answer here will be to do it naturaly... often times buffers in the water twart efforts to change PH chemicaly.. it will change temporirily, but the composistion of the water will try and stabilize the water.... controled water changes and organic items ( drift wood and or peat mosss ) are common ways to slowly lower PH with out adding undue stress to the ocupants of the tank.. there are some REALY savy people here that I'm sure will chime in...

Electric 11-13-2013 12:28 PM

Stable pH is better than achieving an "ideal" number. Playing with the pH is extremely difficult to maintain over time. pH swings are very hard on fish. Best to keep fish that are good with your natural water parameters. Lots of fish do well in 7.2 to 7.8 pH.

jaysee 11-13-2013 12:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Electric (Post 3395137)
Stable pH is better than achieving an "ideal" number. Playing with the pH is extremely difficult to maintain over time. pH swings are very hard on fish. Best to keep fish that are good with your natural water parameters. Lots of fish do well in 7.2 to 7.8 pH.

Agreed. Keep your tank water as close to the source water as possible. Some people do have a legitimate need to alter their water chemistry, but that's the exception not the rule.

Really though, you should not be keeping fish that prefer vastly different water than what you have.

Roccus 11-13-2013 01:00 PM

aggree with the last two posters... take what is given and work with those parameters.. it's much eaiser than trying to re invent the wheel... and as an aside.. the PH will go down some on it's own as the tank/water ages and everything comes into balance... and if you absolutly feel you MUST change the PH... go slow and natural as i stated in my first response...other wise you'll end up frustrated and confused..

beaslbob 11-14-2013 10:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JonandJo (Post 3395049)
Natural vs chemical ph alteration.

Which is best form of bringing a ph level down. If it's natural what would you use to do this.

Natural.

The even bigger question is whether or not you should bring the pH down to begin with.

My tanks run purple on the api high range test kit (8.4-8.8) yet fish reported as 'needing' much lower ph do just fine.

Seems to me that a high pH as the result of live plants sucking out the co2 and returning oxygen, could hardly be harmful to any fish.

Still that just my .02

JonandJo 11-14-2013 01:16 PM

Yet again thanks guys.

This researching into keeping a healthy tank and choosing the right fish to stock is mind boggling.

I was worried as the neons repotedly like ph 6.8 where i'm probably high 7's, the fish seem fine but I'm new to keeping fish so don't want to kill them by neglect.

I do have plants so that's probably pushing the ph up.

roll on after xmas when I can put them in the bigger tank, Christmas trees are such a frivolity I reckon we should ban xmas.

beaslbob 11-14-2013 02:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JonandJo (Post 3401377)
Yet again thanks guys.

This researching into keeping a healthy tank and choosing the right fish to stock is mind boggling.

I was worried as the neons repotedly like ph 6.8 where i'm probably high 7's, the fish seem fine but I'm new to keeping fish so don't want to kill them by neglect.

I do have plants so that's probably pushing the ph up.

roll on after xmas when I can put them in the bigger tank, Christmas trees are such a frivolity I reckon we should ban xmas.


Sounds good.

high pH with plants only means low carbon dioxide. Which can hardly be harmfull to the fish.


my .02

Oldfishlady 11-14-2013 02:05 PM

Most freshwater fish we keep will adapt to our source water pH and hardness without issue.
Very few FW tropical fish need the pH and hardness changed to be successfully kept, however, to stimulate spawning, egg development and G/D of eggs/fry with soft water species will need the water changed to meet their needs-but once the fry are at a certain stage-they can be changed back over to your source water after proper acclimation.

To change the pH-you usually will have to change the hardness-otherwise you will have rebound issues that are stressful on the fish.

Best way to change the pH and hardness without rebound problems-Is using R/O water or rainwater (rainwater can vary in chemistry and safety-always test before use)

IME-I don't change the water chemistry to keep my Neon tetras, however, I do have to change it when I want to spawn them and a few other softwater species I keep-I have very hard well water. (pH 8.8+/over 300 KH/GH) I don't have problems keeping them in my well water.


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