Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Problem with NitrItes =( (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/problem-nitrites-29757/)

Freshyfish 09-28-2009 02:43 PM

Problem with NitrItes =(
 
Today I was planning on buying some new fish to fully stock up my 20G aquarium. It has been set up for about a month now, and everyone is happy. I decided to test the water to make sure that everything was fine before heading out to the fish store, but it turns out my NitrItes are VERY high. Way above 10 PPM. Everything else was in the "Ideal" range on the test strip.

I changed out the carbon filter, did a 40% water change, and I'm hoping that the levels will drop substantially so that I'm able to go out and buy the fish in a week or so.

Is there anything else that I can do to allow the NitrIte levels to drop quicker?

Also, I haven't lost any fish at all since the aquarium was started up. There are 5 Neon Tetras, 1 Golden Gourami, and 3 Platy's. So I assume that they just slowly became acclimated to the changing water parameters.

MoneyMitch 09-28-2009 04:51 PM

40% may have been a bit too much but nothing we can do to change that now, your on stage two of your cycle and have prob about two weeks or so until it completes i would wait till then to add new fish and i would only add two at a time to give things a chance to even out. there is no INSTANT fix for ANYTHING in aquarium water EVER i dont care what a product guarantees and im sure numerous people will back me on this. just be patient and it will all work in your favor. Money

okijapan 09-28-2009 05:20 PM

I'm no fan of adding lots of chemicals in hopes of a good result, but the science behind Seachem Prime is fairly sound.

http://www.seachem.com/Products/prod...ges/Prime.html

I found it pretty interesting. It may just help with your Nitrite issue.

Byron 09-28-2009 05:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Freshyfish (Post 249587)
Today I was planning on buying some new fish to fully stock up my 20G aquarium. It has been set up for about a month now, and everyone is happy. I decided to test the water to make sure that everything was fine before heading out to the fish store, but it turns out my NitrItes are VERY high. Way above 10 PPM. Everything else was in the "Ideal" range on the test strip.

I changed out the carbon filter, did a 40% water change, and I'm hoping that the levels will drop substantially so that I'm able to go out and buy the fish in a week or so.

Is there anything else that I can do to allow the NitrIte levels to drop quicker?

Also, I haven't lost any fish at all since the aquarium was started up. There are 5 Neon Tetras, 1 Golden Gourami, and 3 Platy's. So I assume that they just slowly became acclimated to the changing water parameters.

Did you really mean nitrite? Or is it actually nitrate?

If you really had a nitrite reading of 10ppm there would not be a single fish alive. Nitrite test kits (API's anyway) doesn't even go above 5.

Assuming you really meant nitrate, you have no problems. Nitrate at 10ppm is fine. But don't overload the system--a few fish will allow the bacteria to multiply sufficient to handle the increased ammonia and nitrite over a few days.

Byron.

aunt kymmie 09-28-2009 11:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 249636)
Did you really mean nitrite? Or is it actually nitrate?

If you really had a nitrite reading of 10ppm there would not be a single fish alive. Nitrite test kits (API's anyway) doesn't even go above 5.

Assuming you really meant nitrate, you have no problems. Nitrate at 10ppm is fine. But don't overload the system--a few fish will allow the bacteria to multiply sufficient to handle the increased ammonia and nitrite over a few days.

Byron.

+1. I saw the word nitrite in the first post and thought the next line would be, "and all my fish died".

Freshyfish 09-29-2009 05:51 AM

no, i mean nitrite. with the i.

1077 09-29-2009 07:24 AM

I am unfamiliar with test strips ,and find it odd that they would go up to 10 for as others have mentioned,, anything above zero for nitrites and ammonia is harmful to lethal for fish. Are you sure the test doesn't indicate 1.0 rather than 10ppm/ In any event,, I would perform a 50 percent water change daily or every twelvehours until nitrites are at zero. I would also use a full function water conditioner such as PRIME which can be used at double dose to help with nitrites along with water changes.
I agree with others that you should not add any more fish until your test strips indicate zero for ammonia,and zero for nitrites for three or four consecutive days. Then you should also see nitrAtes which should be kept at twenty or below with weekly 25 percent water changes.
More fish = more ammonia=more nitrites=DEAD fish. You may need to test your water daily and perform water changes daily to keep the ammonia and nitrites at or near zero. I would also recommend feeding the fish once a day or once every other day to help with getting the water parameters under control.

Byron 09-29-2009 11:37 AM

I concur with prevous advice. Also highly recomend you get a small bottle of Seachem's "Stability" for the reasons given in okijapan's post. I can't say it better.

Byron.


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