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-   -   Canister Filters, do they provide enough O2 saturation (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/freshwater-aquarium-equipment/canister-filters-do-they-provide-enough-29732/)

Sasquatcho 09-28-2009 12:20 AM

Canister Filters, do they provide enough O2 saturation
 
Hello, I was an avid fish and Aquarium enthusist when I was younger, I havent had a tank for about 10 years now, I was in school and moving a lot so I couldnt give the time, I am ready to get back into fish collecting but wel...........l things have changed. I see a lot of these canister filters, I only owned one before and it was for a 600 Gallon Tank. My question is do these filters provide enough oxygen saturation levels that an air pump is no longer neccesary? I seem to be getting that impression as I am looking into newer set ups. Also found that when using a canister filter under rock filters are exempt as well? If anyone could give me some info on this that would be great, Thanks

Sasquatcho

Lupin 09-28-2009 05:13 AM

Welcome to Fishforum.com.:wave:

If the canister filters create plenty of surface turbulence, you will not need the airpumps. Airpumps can be redundant if you already have a lot of surface agitation responsible for the gas exchange by lifting off the dissolved carbon dioxide.

For power crisis and other emergencies, it will not hurt to invest towards battery-operated airpumps instead.

okijapan 09-28-2009 06:44 AM

What Lupin said.

Also the undergravel filter is not necessary if you have a canister.

Tyyrlym 09-30-2009 08:03 AM

Aim the return of the filter up towards the surface so it churns things up. That'll give you plenty of agitation and your best O2 transfer.

doughnut 09-30-2009 09:22 PM

Hey Lupin, foregive me this may not be the best place to ask this but, what you had said made me wonder what i would do if i lose power... of course use a battery powered air pump. but past that if the power was off for an extened amount of time say 3 maybe 4 days...what would you do? feed less, a water change or two?

thanks
doughnut

Lupin 10-01-2009 01:34 AM

Get spare batteries to continue filtration/aeration especially when you have a corner box filterto stuff the established filter media in. Aside from that, do feed less and do daily water changes assuming you don't use the power to source your water. A generator isn't a bad investment either.

doughnut 10-01-2009 08:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lupin (Post 250978)
Get spare batteries to continue filtration/aeration especially when you have a corner box filterto stuff the established filter media in. Aside from that, do feed less and do daily water changes assuming you don't use the power to source your water. A generator isn't a bad investment either.

thank you thank you
doughnut

Tyyrlym 10-02-2009 10:45 AM

Unless you have some fish that require it you can simply stop feeding all together for several days with no ill effects.


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