Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   schooling fish biotope (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-freshwater-aquarium/schooling-fish-biotope-29206/)

Firstsalt 09-18-2009 10:36 PM

schooling fish biotope
 
does anyone now of one that would be good and what size aquarium would be good. thanks

Byron 09-19-2009 01:31 PM

It all depends upon the fish you want.

The size of tank must be adequate for a group of the particular fish, both the type of fish, their adult size, and ow many you want in the group. Generally a longer rather than a higher tank is preferred, as this provides more swimming room and greater surface area.

As for the decor, which includes the type of substrate (sand, gravel, rocky pebble), wood and/or rocks, and plants, it depends upon whether you want a true biotope or a geographic setup.

A biotope is strictly speaking a replica of the particular stream or lake where the fish originate. The fish and plants (if any, and many biotopes have no plants) would only be those species that could be found living together in that particular stream or river or lake, and the wood or rocks would be used if these are found in the natural habitat.

A geographic setup is one in which all the fish and plants are native to the same geographic area, and the wood/rocks would be found there. I have this type of aquaria, a 115g Amazonian riverscape, a 90g flooded Amazonian forest, and a 70g SE Asian swamp/stream. The specific plants and fish do not have to be found together in the same stream in this type of setup, but they would all occur in the same geographic area.

Byron.

Firstsalt 09-19-2009 06:48 PM

i was thinking a neon tetra/ hatchet fish tank if i go with amazon but if i go with southeast asia i will go with a small barb

Byron 09-19-2009 06:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Firstsalt (Post 245520)
i was thinking a neon tetra/ hatchet fish tank if i go with amazon but if i go with southeast asia i will go with a small barb

In both cases the mentioned fish are shoaling and should be in groups. Minimum 6 or 7, but more if the tank has space. A 33 long would be fine for a group of neons and hatchets, say 7-9 of each, plus some corys on the bottom (also shoaling, so 6+). For barbs, being a slightly larger fish or more active swimmers, I would suggest larger, maybe a 50g, and you could add a group of small loaches. You seem to be thinking geographic rather than true biotope.

Firstsalt 09-19-2009 09:20 PM

what do you mean, i thought that was what biotope is. maybe i should make a long tank with a bunch, as in many, of hatchet fish half filled and some type of insects flying around. is that a biotope

volkspider 09-20-2009 03:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Firstsalt (Post 245568)
maybe i should make a long tank with a bunch, as in many, of hatchet fish half filled and some type of insects flying around. is that a biotope

You're thinking of a paludarium.

Byron 09-20-2009 10:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Firstsalt (Post 245568)
what do you mean, i thought that was what biotope is. maybe i should make a long tank with a bunch, as in many, of hatchet fish half filled and some type of insects flying around. is that a biotope

I explained biotope and geographic in an earlier response. I can't explain it much better. B.

aunt kymmie 09-20-2009 12:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 245392)

A biotope is strictly speaking a replica of the particular stream or lake where the fish originate. The fish and plants (if any, and many biotopes have no plants) would only be those species that could be found living together in that particular stream or river or lake, and the wood or rocks would be used if these are found in the natural habitat.

A geographic setup is one in which all the fish and plants are native to the same geographic area, and the wood/rocks would be found there. I have this type of aquaria, a 115g Amazonian riverscape, a 90g flooded Amazonian forest, and a 70g SE Asian swamp/stream. The specific plants and fish do not have to be found together in the same stream in this type of setup, but they would all occur in the same geographic area.

Byron.

A biotope is a smaller part of a geographical area. Make sense?

Firstsalt 09-20-2009 01:50 PM

ok sorry yeah that makes sense


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