Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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Blaxicanlatino 09-02-2009 12:26 PM

Decaying Ludwigia
 
I have a bunch of red ludwigia in my tank that appear to be doing fine but at the base of the stems, keeps dying! a fert regularly with liquid and gravel tabs and use excel so why does the base of the plant keep dying?

Byron 09-02-2009 12:43 PM

This is common. Except in fairly high-teck tanks I wuld even go so far as to say normal. Stem plants are fast growers, needing higher light and more nutrients than rooted plants. Light rarely gets to the lower leaves in adequate amounts due to the upper leaves blocking it. And stem plants are higher maintainance, meaning you regularly have to prune them to avoid what you've described. My Brazilian Pennywort does much the same, and when it gets longer than I want it I pull up the stems, cut off the bottom parts (with the yellowing or no leaves) and stick the tops back in the substrate to grow up again.

The light also affects the red plants, but as you indicate the tops are OK it is not a light problem, other than what I've mentioned above.

Byron.

Blaxicanlatino 09-02-2009 12:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 237266)
This is common. Except in fairly high-teck tanks I wuld even go so far as to say normal. Stem plants are fast growers, needing higher light and more nutrients than rooted plants. Light rarely gets to the lower leaves in adequate amounts due to the upper leaves blocking it. And stem plants are higher maintainance, meaning you regularly have to prune them to avoid what you've described. My Brazilian Pennywort does much the same, and when it gets longer than I want it I pull up the stems, cut off the bottom parts (with the yellowing or no leaves) and stick the tops back in the substrate to grow up again.

The light also affects the red plants, but as you indicate the tops are OK it is not a light problem, other than what I've mentioned above.

Byron.


so basicly prune more? sounds good to me thanks :D I also have the pennywort you do but its yellowing and getting dark green spots on it for some reason. i leave mine free floating.

Byron 09-02-2009 01:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blaxicanlatino (Post 237270)
so basicly prune more? sounds good to me thanks :D I also have the pennywort you do but its yellowing and getting dark green spots on it for some reason. i leave mine free floating.

The yellowing is lack of nutrients; as it is floating lack of light would not be an issue. The dark green spots are probably algae, especially since it is floating and nearer the lights.

Do you use liquid fertilizer? And if so, what?

Byron.

Blaxicanlatino 09-02-2009 01:37 PM

i use seachem ferts and seachem root tabs.

Byron 09-02-2009 03:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blaxicanlatino (Post 237296)
i use seachem ferts and seachem root tabs.

If the liquid is Flourish Comprehensive, it should be adequate once or twice a week (have to experiment a bit). Comprehensive is balanced, all the necessary nutrients in the correct porportion for the plants. The root tabs obviously wouldn't have much impact on floating plants aside from what leeches into the water. If you are using individual fertilizers, the plants may be missing something they need (there are a lot of nutrients needed).

If you're using the Flourish Comprehensive, try it twice a week and see if there is any change after 2-3 weeks. Keep an eye on algae, it occurs when nutrients exceed what the plants can use. Once again that word "balance' comes into play.

Byron.

Blaxicanlatino 09-02-2009 08:33 PM

i see. i have so many plants though. overcrowded really 0_0 and i added a water wisteria plant about a month ago

Byron 09-03-2009 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blaxicanlatino (Post 237516)
i see. i have so many plants though. overcrowded really 0_0 and i added a water wisteria plant about a month ago

Overcrowding with plants is a bonus, unlike with fish where it is detrimental. Plants are nature's filters, they do a better job than any filter we can put in an aquarium. This probably exlains/confirms what I said earlier though about light getting down to the lower stems. But that's normal, just trim them weekly or when they need it and you're fine. The more live growing plants, the healthier the fish will be.

Byron.

artgalnj 09-03-2009 02:40 PM

I feel for you. Everything in my tank is actually growing, expect for the ludwigia. It's just "there". Not growing, not dying, shooting off roots...I have no idea. I dose regularly, but then the plecos uproot them and I'm back at square one. Not sure how I'm feeling about the bunched plants. :roll:


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