Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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-   -   Cloudy Tank (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/freshwater-tropical-fish/cloudy-tank-24206/)

KILO 05-24-2009 03:55 PM

Cloudy Tank
 
Ive got a 20g convict cichlid tank and about a week ago i could not hardly see the back side of the tank. So i basically cleaned everything all the rocks and did a water change which i do weekly and it was back to crystal clear. but now it seems its getting cloudy again are there any ways to prevent this?

Byron 05-25-2009 01:20 PM

How long has this tank been setup? How many fish (and what kind, if other than just convicts)?

KILO 05-26-2009 12:13 PM

The tanks been set up for probably 7-8 months and i currently just have one convict. He killed the other one:-?

Byron 05-26-2009 01:04 PM

After 8 months sudden cloudiness is attributable to something, probably biological. Did you rinse the filter media? Two things possible with the filter, 1. it may be clogged and not removing particulate matter from the water as it should, and 2. if it was rinsed, cloudiness sometimes occurs for a few days after; some of the bacteria have been killed/removed, and what's left may not be sufficient to handle the bioload until the bacteria multiplies.

I've also had cloudiness from the tap water, but that is not likely here as your partial water change cleared the tank rather than caused the cloudiness.

Have you tested the ammonia? May or may not be related, just another thought.

iamntbatman 05-26-2009 11:14 PM

Definitely give the ammonia a test.

Is the cloudiness green, or milky white? Green means you've got an algae bloom, which can be cleared up in a number of ways although total blackouts usually work well.

If it's milky white (which is what it sounds like), that's a bacterial bloom, attributable to any number of things, including the things suggested by Byron. Aggressive water changes help combat this problem. Beware that sudden increases of bacteria in your water column severely deplete your dissolved oxygen, which can kill your fish. If you have hang-on-back filters, keep the water level lowered a little so that the filter outflow creates more movement at the surface of the water, which helps with oxygen exchange.


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