Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/)
-   Beginner Planted Aquarium (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-planted-aquarium/)
-   -   Live plants for starter (http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/beginner-planted-aquarium/live-plants-starter-24201/)

Nephelie 05-24-2009 11:54 AM

Live plants for starter
 
Hi!

Recently i just started a 10gallons tanks and i was thinking of having some cabomba, java moss, and pearl weed in it but i have no experience whatsoever about live plants so can anyone help me?

froglady 05-24-2009 12:44 PM

I think with good lighting it will be fine. I use to anchor the java moss to a peice of wood or ordiment in the aquarium, as you want to keep it away from the intake tube to the filter.

Nephelie 05-24-2009 02:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by froglady (Post 198336)
I think with good lighting it will be fine. I use to anchor the java moss to a peice of wood or ordiment in the aquarium, as you want to keep it away from the intake tube to the filter.

Does real dry wood work in the tank or do i get an artificial one?

Byron 05-24-2009 02:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nephelie (Post 198366)
Does real dry wood work in the tank or do i get an artificial one?

If you buy the wood, real or artificial, from a reputable aquarium store, it should be OK. Some of it will "float" and need to be weighted down; it depends upon the type. There is some nice and realistic looking ceramic artificial wood you can buy.

If by "dry wood" you were thinking of wood you find outside, be very careful. First, not all wood is safe in an aquarium: some will come apart (rot) very quickly; and it can leech toxic substances like resin, pitch and sap into the water, or other toxins that it may have absorbed like pesticides, oil, etc. Second, it has to be boiled and soaked to clean it and get it waterlogged. Third, it can carry parasites (especially if it is under water in nature) which the boiling should kill. I have never used wood from outside in an aquarium because I don't know what it may have been in contact with and I'd rather spend the money to be more safe.

Nephelie 05-24-2009 10:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 198373)
If you buy the wood, real or artificial, from a reputable aquarium store, it should be OK. Some of it will "float" and need to be weighted down; it depends upon the type. There is some nice and realistic looking ceramic artificial wood you can buy.

If by "dry wood" you were thinking of wood you find outside, be very careful. First, not all wood is safe in an aquarium: some will come apart (rot) very quickly; and it can leech toxic substances like resin, pitch and sap into the water, or other toxins that it may have absorbed like pesticides, oil, etc. Second, it has to be boiled and soaked to clean it and get it waterlogged. Third, it can carry parasites (especially if it is under water in nature) which the boiling should kill. I have never used wood from outside in an aquarium because I don't know what it may have been in contact with and I'd rather spend the money to be more safe.

Lol! no, by dry wood, i mean dry wood at the store, not some random dry wood i would pick of the ground. I was just wondering whether i can use dry wood or not because i don't like to use fake stuff, it doesn't look authentic. So that why i wanted to know whether if i can use real wood or not then i will use real wood. Also, what is fertilizer or CO2?

Byron 05-25-2009 09:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nephelie (Post 198543)
Lol! no, by dry wood, i mean dry wood at the store, not some random dry wood i would pick of the ground. I was just wondering whether i can use dry wood or not because i don't like to use fake stuff, it doesn't look authentic. So that why i wanted to know whether if i can use real wood or not then i will use real wood. Also, what is fertilizer or CO2?

Wood purchased from a reputable aquarium/fish store should be OK. The darker wood (used to be called mangrove root) like I have in my tanks (see my photos under "Aquariums") is heavy enough to sink immediately. The lighter buff-coloured wood like Mopani wood will float and has to be weighted down. All wood will leech tannins into the water for a few months, colouring the water a yellowish/brownish tint like tea. It is harmless to fish but some aquarists don't like the look of unclear water, so they boil the wood or soak it for a week in a tub of water to remove some of the tannins. Some stores have wood in their fish tanks and will sell it to you; one advantage is that it is soaked and most of the tannins will already have leeched out. The disadvantage is that it has been in contact with fish and could carry parasites or disease just like buying any fish, so you should "quarantine" the wood in a tank of plain water for a week. This is worth it, because the tannins have leeched out and the wood is heavy enough to sink.

Fertilizers usually refers to liquid fertilizer for plants, that are trace elements and minerals that aquatic plants require to grow. Most of us with planted aquariums add liquid fertilizer once or more a week, depending upon the plant needs.

CO2 is the gas carbon dioxide that we all expel in breathing, and fish do the same when they respirate. Plants need CO2 to grow, and some plants get enough from the fish in the tank, while others require more and some planted tank aquarists buy CO2 units to add CO2 to their aquarium. I've never bothered with this, it is expensive and in my view not necessary unless you want to grow certain plants faster. You can see what my tanks look like without any CO2 except what the fish provide.

Nephelie 05-25-2009 03:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron (Post 198630)
Wood purchased from a reputable aquarium/fish store should be OK. The darker wood (used to be called mangrove root) like I have in my tanks (see my photos under "Aquariums") is heavy enough to sink immediately. The lighter buff-coloured wood like Mopani wood will float and has to be weighted down. All wood will leech tannins into the water for a few months, colouring the water a yellowish/brownish tint like tea. It is harmless to fish but some aquarists don't like the look of unclear water, so they boil the wood or soak it for a week in a tub of water to remove some of the tannins. Some stores have wood in their fish tanks and will sell it to you; one advantage is that it is soaked and most of the tannins will already have leeched out. The disadvantage is that it has been in contact with fish and could carry parasites or disease just like buying any fish, so you should "quarantine" the wood in a tank of plain water for a week. This is worth it, because the tannins have leeched out and the wood is heavy enough to sink.

Fertilizers usually refers to liquid fertilizer for plants, that are trace elements and minerals that aquatic plants require to grow. Most of us with planted aquariums add liquid fertilizer once or more a week, depending upon the plant needs.

CO2 is the gas carbon dioxide that we all expel in breathing, and fish do the same when they respirate. Plants need CO2 to grow, and some plants get enough from the fish in the tank, while others require more and some planted tank aquarists buy CO2 units to add CO2 to their aquarium. I've never bothered with this, it is expensive and in my view not necessary unless you want to grow certain plants faster. You can see what my tanks look like without any CO2 except what the fish provide.

Thanks for your information, it was very helpful! Now I know what to do. Again, thank you!

Blaxicanlatino 05-26-2009 08:43 AM

if your gonna use that wood then be careful because real wood could lower the pH and even rot o change the color of the water. i would go fake when it come to the wood.

SinCrisis 05-26-2009 08:51 PM

If you get real wood, you could even plant some plants in the wood, looks awesome. I have a micro sword in one of my pieces of wood. Yes wood lowers PH but it doesn't really change it enough to be worried about. My water is 8.0 out of the tap and 1 large piece, roughly a 1' by 6" by 4" LxWxH dropped my ph by .2. In a small tank like yours, your wood would be even smaller and steady water changes will keep the PH level fairly stable. The tannin effect is especially good for tetras ive heard.

Nephelie 05-28-2009 11:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blaxicanlatino (Post 198927)
if your gonna use that wood then be careful because real wood could lower the pH and even rot o change the color of the water. i would go fake when it come to the wood.

If i use real wood, i would be really careful with it. I probably gonna do more research into this and see how it is. Thanks for your thoughtful consideration.

Quote:

Originally Posted by SinCrisis (Post 199113)
If you get real wood, you could even plant some plants in the wood, looks awesome. I have a micro sword in one of my pieces of wood. Yes wood lowers PH but it doesn't really change it enough to be worried about. My water is 8.0 out of the tap and 1 large piece, roughly a 1' by 6" by 4" LxWxH dropped my ph by .2. In a small tank like yours, your wood would be even smaller and steady water changes will keep the PH level fairly stable. The tannin effect is especially good for tetras ive heard.

Yeah, the reason i was thinking of real wood is because i know u can plant plants on it so that why i really like it. I probably gonna try it once my tank is like a few months old after it cycled.

What is tannin effects?


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:19 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2